nagualism

Its called nahualli in classical Nahuatl and nagualism in more modern practices. The concept of you having an animal that shares it’s soul with you. Sorcerers (brujas y brujos) can transform into the animal that shares their soul [nahualli]. They resemble the concept of a personal totem and shamanic magic.

To Mesoamericans and modern Natives of Mexico animals are really important in magic. In traditional Aztec thought everyone has a nahualli, animal that shares it’s soul with you. However, a good sorcerer can obtain more nahualli. Though it will never share it’s soul like the one you were born with. You can obtain other nahualli through ritual, by stealing someone else’s nahualli, or as a gift from the gods.

One sort of ritual to get another nahualli is to hunt, kill, and eat what animal you want. By eating the animal [or even a person] in magical thought was to “take it’s power” for yourself. [Think you are what you eat.] Life sustained on life, the cycle continues.

Animals are so important in magical thought amongst the people of Mexico that where you’re places on the social ladder would have to do with your nahualli. The frequently seen animals [mice, skunks, pigs, cows, rabbits, etc] by humans represent commoners. Regular folk that make up the majority. The uncommonly seen animals represent the middle class [coyotes, ocelotls etc]. The most powerful people on the social ladder [noble/ruling class] and the most powerful sorcerers are the infrequently, often times nocturnal, animals. [jaguar, owl, bear etc] The most powerful and elusive of all these animals being the jaguar who is held at the highest level amongst most people in ancient and modern Mexico. Anybody with the born nahualli of a jaguar is thought to be endowed with being a powerful sorcerer and skilled at magic naturally.

A “witch” is defined as a person, usually female, who only uses magic to harm. Most people use magic to cure, but also use witchcraft [harmful magic] and curing. These people are usually identified as curers and their practice is past done to apprentices.

Practices and beliefs have the beliefs of Catholicism mixed in with PreColombian beliefs of Natives, such as the Aztecs and Mayans. This happens in rural Mexico.

To Mesoamericans and modern Mexicans reality is an appearance.  Any sorcerer/witch/skilled magic user knows that there is layers of reality under this one. That’s why there is 9 layers of the underworld and 13 layers of the heavens. While the main cormos is consisted of earth, heaven, and the underworld. [Earth is middle, underworld below, and heaven above.] Most of magic in Mexico and pre-colombia Mexico used the practice called dream working. Where you use your dreams to manipulate reality, gather information, or cure someone and so forth. Rituals may take place in the waking world, while the rest takes place in the other one, the realm of dreams, where the sorcerer or curer can travel to the underworld if needed. Caves, mirrors, and water are thought to be portals in this otherworld. If one can’t travel to the underworld or otherworld in dreams, one would do a ritual in a cave or the cave’s entrance for example.

The appearance of reality, layers of realities with in reality, is perhaps a very important part of magical practice. Trickery and illusions in Mesoamerican magic is very much used and valued. The god of sorcerers himself, Tezcatlipoca, often used trickery, which included appearance based magic to get what he wanted. [His nahualli is also a jaguar] These types of things are a good skill to learn if one travels to the otherworld or underworld, as one would encounter demons and spirits with ulterior motives. Also, stealth is a skill to be acquired so that one would not be seen by beings that might harm one.

In theory one can influence reality through the otherworld. Like a ripple effect when you through a stone into water. In the dream world you can turn into your nahualli, become in tune with it, and use its skills. This is especially useful if you have a flying type nahualli, which can go into the heavens better and travel at a better speed.

Animism is a concept, that everything has a spirit. Even inanimate objects. This is useful in incantations where you state your intention and will. Its how you make objects yours and how you direct their energy, as well as purifying.

Amongst the otomi it is thought that you should do your best not to influence people too negatively, because you may attract the attention of a witch. That is you should blend in.


-Xoc

The Nagual

Werewolves, and other werecreatures, can be found all over the world and all throughout time. Countless cultures have their own unique werewolf tales and legends. Lets explore the ancient lore of South America, to a time when the nagual reigned; a being with many different manifestations.

In ancient Aztec lore, the nagual were originally the form that shape-shifting shamans assumed in order to perform various deeds. The name Nagual, which is derived from the Aztec Naualii, can also be applied to a person’s familiar spirit, or their totem spirit. To discover their Nagual, youths of Central America left their villages to spend the night in a secluded place away from their tribe. The animal that appeared to them in their dreams was their Nagual, their spirit guide.

Now, in Mexican folklore the Nagual is a bit different than those two above. They were once incredibly feared supernatural beings. Some of them have been described as a phantom standing about seven feet tall. The creature is covered with hair, has long arms, and has the feet and claws of a wolf. The face is also distinctly wolf-like, with pointed ears, a long snout, and sharp teeth. On top of its appearance, it also howls. While it has the general look of a wolf, it also has the ability to shape shift into the form of a snake, a puma, or a wild dog.

From shape-shifting shamans, to spirit guides, and eventually to monstrous beasts; which version of the Nagual is your favorite?

I revised my original post on brujeria/nahualli. Original post is here. Warning, long read.

Nahualli & Aztec witchcraft

A “Witch” is usually defined as a person, usually female, who only uses magick to harm in the older Mexican traditions. Amongst the Otomi people, for example, it is thought that you should do your best not to influence people too negatively or in any negative manner. This is because you may attract the attention of a Witch, who could be offended. You are to blend in with everyone, so to speak. Although this attitude is changing in modern times. Brujeria [Spanish for Witchcraft.] is being more embraced. (It may be the influence of more modern traditions such as Wicca.) Most people use magick to cure, but also use Witchcraft and curing practices. These people are usually identified as “curers” [curandero] and their practice is passed down to apprentices. It’s lineage based a majority of the time, similar to Gardernarian Wicca.

They are more common all over Central America now. Their practices may differ from area to area.(Not too dramatically though.) They’re usually found in more rural areas where Catholicism did not quite take the hold that it did in bigger cities. (Their beliefs are less “Christianized” than ones in cities.) They tend to be more superstitious in these types of areas, maybe because of isolation. Practices and beliefs have the added the traditions of Catholicism mixed in with Pre-Colombian beliefs of Natives, such as the Aztecs and Mayans. This happens mostly in rural Mexico. The Aztec religion technically, still “lives” because of these practices.

Many times Brujas or Brujos are employed for the magickal prowess. (Brujas is the feminine term for Witch, while Brujo is the masculine term.) They can be employed for curses and curing. However, curing is the most common request of magickal practices there. The curandero will do anything from removing the evil eye, to cleansings, to healing ailments, and giving out herbal remedies. (When scientifically tested, it was found that traditional Aztec medicine was up to 60% effective in treating patients, which was a high rate for people without modern technology.) They might even remove curses cast by enemies or perform exorcisms.

Modern Aztecs still honor the old spirits that dwell in those places. (Animal spirits, earth spirits, spirits of the air, etc.) The curandero or Bruja can act as though they are a shaman at times, that is a part-time magick user and part-time priest. (This is pretty close to how people used to be in the old ways, before civilization.) Their prayers also honor the earth, heavens, and underworld. They usually build their altars with the representation of these layers. (Animism is a concept, that everything has a spirit. Even inanimate objects. This is useful in incantations where you state your intention and will. Its how you make objects yours and how you direct their energy, as well as purifying. Animism is inherent in all Mesoamerican beliefs. Even the modern ones are still popular like this.)

To Mesoamericans and modern Mexicans reality is an appearance. Any sorcerer/Witch/skilled magick user knows that there is layers of reality under this one. That’s why there is 9 layers of the underworld and 13 layers of the heavens. While the main cosmos is consisted of earth, heaven, and the underworld. [Earth is middle, underworld below, and heaven above.] Most of magick in Mexico and Pre-Colombia Mexico used the practice called dream working. Where you use your dreams to manipulate reality, gather information, or cure someone and so forth.

The appearance of reality, layers of realities with in reality, is perhaps a very important part of magickal practice. Trickery and illusions in Mesoamerican magick is very much used and valued. The god of sorcerers himself, Tezcatlipoca, also known as San Simon or Maximon to modern Natives, often used trickery, which included appearance based magick to get what he wanted. [His nahualli is also a legendary jaguar.] These types of things are a good skill to learn if one travels to the otherworld or underworld, as one would encounter demons and spirits with ulterior motives. Also, stealth is a skill to be acquired so that one would not be seen by beings that might harm one.

Rituals may take place in the waking world, while the rest takes place in the other one, the realm of dreams, where the sorcerer or curer can travel to the underworld if needed. Caves, mirrors, and water are thought to be portals in this otherworld. (Any reflective surfaces count or places underground.) If one can’t travel to the underworld or otherworld in dreams, one would do a ritual in a cave or the cave’s entrance for example.

To ancient Mesoamericans and modern Natives of Mexico animals are really important in magick. In traditional Aztec thought everyone has a nahualli, animal that shares it’s soul with you. However, a good sorcerer can obtain more nahualli. Though it will never share it’s soul like the one you were born with. You can obtain other nahualli through ritual, by stealing someone else’s nahualli, or as a gift from the gods. (This is very similar to the modern belief of personal totem animals, and it has a modern name; nagual or nagualism.) One sort of ritual to get another nahualli is to hunt, kill, and eat what animal you want. By eating the animal [or even a person] in magickal thought was to “take it’s power” for yourself. [Think you are what you eat.] Life sustained on life, the cycle continues.

Animals are so important in magickal thought amongst the people of Mexico that where you’re places on the social ladder would have to do with your nahualli. The frequently seen animals [Mice, skunks, pigs, cows, rabbits, etc] by humans represent commoners. Regular folk that make up the majority. The uncommonly seen animals represent the “middle class”.[Coyotes, ocelotls etc].

The most powerful people on the social ladder [noble/ruling class] and the most powerful sorcerers are the infrequently, often times nocturnal, animals. [Jaguar, owl, bear etc] The most powerful and elusive of all these animals being the jaguar who is held at the highest level amongst most people in ancient and modern Mexico. Anybody with the born nahualli of a jaguar is thought to be endowed with being a powerful sorcerer and skilled at magick naturally.

In theory one can influence reality through the otherworld. Like a ripple effect when you through a stone into water. In the dream world you can turn into your nahualli, become in tune with it, and use its skills. This is especially useful if you have a flying type nahualli or totem, which can go into the heavens better and travel at a better speed.

The original article is here. Off of Tumblr, please share the link rather than the post. Thanks. ^_^

Word of the Day: nagual

n. Among certain indigenous peoples of Mexico and surrounding countries: a guardian spirit in animal form, believed to accompany and guide an individual through life; an animal form believed to be assumed by a human through magical or supernatural means

Image: “Nagual” by Giggette. Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

“You are Life passing through your body, passing through your mind, passing through your soul. Once you find that out, not with the logic, not with the intellect, but because you can feel that Life — you find out that you are the force that makes the flowers open and close, that makes the hummingbird fly from flower to flower. You find out that you are in every tree, you are in every animal, vegetable, and rock. You are that force that moves the wind and breathes through your body. The whole universe is a living being that is moved by that force, and that is what you are. You are Life.”

― Don Miguel Ruiz
The Mastery Of Love: A Practical Guide to the Art of Relationship: A Toltec Wisdom Book
http://amzn.to/1uQbJks

Image Credit: Simon Haiduk

Intent/Will

For pure will, unassuaged of purpose, delivered from the lust of result, is every way perfect. (AL I:44)

Kk so I’m reading art of dreaming again and the part where Don Juan explains to Carlos what intent and intending is, fucking awesome!

“sorcerers intend anything they set themselves to intend, simply by intending it.” - Art of Dreaming

When explaining the concept Don Juan tells Castaneda that you shouldn’t try to force yourself into accomplishing your intent, not to approach intent like normal people do.

Instead, he tells him, you must become convinced that your intent is being accomplished. This will arise a feeling in the body, a knowing in your whole self, every cell in you must feel like the intent is being accomplished. Then the only thing left is to retain that feeling while accomplishing your intent (Will).

What this does is communicate our intent to our energy body, and in a silent way to the unconscious. If we begin to stress over the intent, worry about it, or think obsessively about it then these things will arise a different feeling in our body and give a different message to the energy body.

We must simply intend, feel it as deeply as we can, and DO while in that holistic state of conviction that your intent is being accomplished.

This is more or less the same as doing your Will without the lust of result.

5

Xiuhcoátl, the Turquoise Serpent, or Fire Serpent.

Xiuhcoátl is the Nagual, the Spirit Animal of Xiuhtecuhtli, the Turquoise Lord, Teótl of Fire, Time, the Center, the Hearth, and Wisdom, Father to the Teótl and embodiment of wisdom. The Xiuhcoátl is also an atlatl wielded by Huitzilopochtli, the Sun at the Zenith, who personifies the victory of wisdom over ignorance.

The Turquoise Serpent is the dry season, as opposed to Quetzalcoátl, the Plumed Serpent, who is the wet season. Metaphorically, in the wet Mexican summer, Quetzalcoátl descends to the earth and covers it with his skin and plumage; all the earth is covered with his green feathers, and life blooms. In the dry Winter, Xiuhcoátl descends, and with his fiery skin covers the earth, and all the vegetation dries out and dies.

The serpent also represents the movement of time; its very body is shaped like the year-glyph, its body forming trapezoidal, year-glyph shapes, and its tail is the glyph itself. Thus, the serpent Xiuhcoátl is symbolic of day, fire, turquoise, the dry season, and wisdom.

In the photos, he appears at the top as the Spirit Animal of Xiuhtecuhtli; he circles the body of the Turquoise Lord, and from his flaming skin emerges calendar glyphs, representing time. In the detail, can be seen his curling snout and his year-glyph tail. The following two pictures are ancient Mexica stone carvings of Xiuhcoátl, and at the bottom, one of my paintings in which Huitzilopochtli, the Hummingbird on the Left, the Sun at its Zenith, holds Xiuhcoátl in his hand as a weapon with which to defeat his sister the moon, and, metaphorically, the triumph of wisdom over ignorance.

My paintings are available as limited edition prints in my Etsy store at this link.

“Each animal brings to people something Native American traditions call animal medicine. The animals’ own physical traits bring spiritual lessons. Their natural instincts teach us things we have forgotten. Totem animals we encounter in visions and dreams come to teach us these lessons. These lessons are usually about qualities missing in our lives.

[…]

These totems guide and protect us in our waking and sleeping visions. Shamanic journeyers are greeted by a power animal that has a lesson for them. Shamans from the Central American traditions call their totem their nagual or nahvalli. Siberian shamans call them tutelary spirits. European witches work with animal familiars.

The power animals could be the animal archetype, or original animal oversoul, but individual animals play a role in guidance.”

- Christopher Penczak
Spirit Allies: Meet Your Team from the Other Side
http://amzn.to/1uMIlJd

Image Credit: Mandy Tsung

Doroteo Juarez used to drink a lot of mescal. One evening he saw a giant nagual in shape of dragon. The nagual asked for a drink, and Doroteo got so frightened that he promised to the Virgin of Guadalupe to stop drinking if she chase the nagual away. The nagual disappeared like smoke in the air. The Doroteo’s wife thanks the Virgin because her husband doesn’t drink anymore and his life is happier now.

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El texto sigue en Español depues del Ingles

Quetzalcoátl plays the conch trumpet in the four corners of the underworld. In this painting from the Quetzalcoátl cycle, The Plumed Serpent has already descended to the underworld to ask for the bones of the ancestors in the keeping of the Lord of Death to create the new race of men for this, the Fifth Universe. However, Mictlantecuhtli, the Teótl of Death, agrees to give up the bones only on the condition that Quetzalcoátl play a conch trumpet at the four corners of Mictlán. This is a trick, however, for the trumpet has no holes, and can therefore make no sound. Xolotl, the Spirit Animal of Quetzalcoátl, tells him to summon the wasps and worms to enter the shell; the worms dig holes and the wasps beat their wings, causing the trumpet to reverberate. Thereupon Quetzalcoátl and his Nagual traverse the four corners of the underworld, playing the trumpet, and causing all Mictlán to ring with its thunder. You can find this and other paintings from my book as prints in my Etsy store, at this link. https://www.etsy.com/shop/MexicaHeart

Quetzalcoátl toca la trompeta de caracol en los cuatro rincones del inframundo. En esta pintura del ciclo de Quetzalcoatl, la Serpiente Emplumada ya ha descendido al inframundo para pedir los huesos de los ancestres en el cuidado del Señor de la Muerte para crear la nueva raza de hombres para esto, la Quinta Universo. Sin embargo, Mictlantecuhtli, el Téotl de la Muerte, se compromete a renunciar a los huesos sólo a condición de que Quetzalcóatl juega una trompeta de caracol en las cuatro esquinas de Mictlán. Este es un truco, sin embargo, porque la trompeta no tiene agujeros, y por lo tanto no puede hacer ningún sonido. Xólotl, el Animal Espíritu de Quetzalcoatl, le dice que se convocará a las avispas y gusanos para entrar en la concha; los gusanos cavan agujeros y las avispas baten sus alas, haciendo que la trompeta reverbera. Entonces Quetzalcóatl y su Nagual atraviesan las cuatro esquinas del mundo subterráneo, tocando la trompeta, y causando todo Mictlán a sonar con su trueno.

Watch on theparanormalblog.tumblr.com

Man Discovers the Carcass of a ‘Nagual’ in Mexico?

A man in Tequila, Jalisco, Mexico captured video of a strange carcass he discovered by some train tracks. In the video, we see the man inspecting four severed limbs that are lying on the ground. Only a few steps away is the body that the limbs were once attached too. The lower torso is nowhere to be found, but the rest of the body is mostly intact. The carcass’ appears to have a canine-like head, complete with big, sharp teeth and snout similar to a dog’s. The skin of the carcass is fleshy and hairless. The eyes are black and are bulging out of their sockets. It’s believed that this is the carcass of a 'Nagual’, which is a spiritual creature from Mesoamerican folk religion. A nagual is a spiritual being that takes the form of an animal that attaches itself to a human upon their birth. The nagual is thought to act as a double, a shadow or as a protective spirit, and some believe that a person can change their shape into that of the nagual.

I want to know if there’s a way for someone to exchange their Nagual for another one, because according to this website, mine is a spider. Now I don’t know how accurate that website is, but if my spirit guardian is really a spider, then it’s probably best that it never shows itself to me because it would most-likely end up on the bottom of my shoe. But, I digress. Let’s move on an talk about this mystery carcass. It doesn’t look like it’s fake. Since it’s covered in flies, that could rule out the possibility of this being a rubber dummy. However, some have suggested that this is a skinned animal carcass, possibly a dog or some other kind of canid, that was deliberately placed there. If that’s the case, then that could explain why the lower torso isn’t anywhere to be found. In my personal opinion, I think that this is most likely the body of a dead, skinned animal. The whole scene in general looks staged. If this thing really was run over by a train, then the area wouldn’t be clean and we’d see blood and innards splattered all over the place. But, that’s just my opinion. I’d like the hear what you think about this video. Do you think it shows the body of a dead Nagual? Or do you think this is just a skinned animal carcass?

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