myths exposed

the list of proposed books to ban from “gays against gentrification (GAG)” before they deleted their facebook: 

-Admission Accomplished - Jill Johnston
-Against Sadomasochism - Robin R. Linden, Darlene R. Pagano, Diana E. Russell, Susan Leigh Star
-Amazon Odyssey: Collection of Writings - Ti-Grace Atkinson
-Buddhism after Patriarchy - Rita M. Gross
-The Female Man - Joana Russ
-Female Sexual Sl*v*ry - Kathleen Barry
-Feminism Unmodified - Catharine A. Mackinnon
-First Buddhist Women: Poems and Stories of Awakening Susan Murcott
-Gyn/Ecology - Mary Daly
-The Idea of Prostitution - Sheila Jeffreys
-The Industrial Vagina: The Political Economy of the Global Sex Trade - Sheila Jeffreys
-Intercourse - Andrea Dworkin
-The Lesbian Heresy - Sheila Jeffreys
-Nine Parts of Desire: The Hidden World of Islamic Women - Geraldine Brooks
-Not a Choice, Not a Job: Exposing the Myths about Prostitution and the Global Sex Trade - Janice Raymond
-Not for Sale: Feminists Resisting Prostitution and Pornography-Of Women Born - Adrienne Rich
-Pornography: Men Possessing Women - Andrea Dworkin
-Radical Acceptance - Tara Brach
-The Sexual Liberals and the Attack on Feminism - Janice Raymond
-Women As Wombs: Reproductive Technologies and the Battle over Women’s Freedom - Janice Raymond

Vampires: The Occult Truth by Konstantinos

Discover the strange world of the undead and the proof that creatures of the night exist when you read Vampires by Konstantinos.

The facts about vampires are stranger than anything you may have read, heard, or imagined before. In Vampires you’ll learn the truth about the undead. It rips away the myth and exposes the habits and lifestyles of these beings.

Vampires reveals the occult truths about these creatures including actual first-person encounters with vampires of all types—the ancient undead of folklore, contemporary mortal blood drinkers, and the most dangerous creatures of all: psychic vampires who intentionally drain the life force from their victims.

- Learn about the four types of vampires
- Read about vampire legends from around the world
- Discover vampires from history, including:
- Arnold Paole of Serbia
- Peter Plogojowitz and the Count de Cabreras of Hungary
- The vampire of Croglin Grange, Cumberland, England
- Countess Elizabeth Bathory, responsible for up to 650 deaths
- Gilles de Rais
- Fritz Haarman, of Germany, from ninety years ago
- John Haigh of Yorkshire, England, from just before WWII
- And of course, the real Vlad Dracula
- Present-day blood drinkers
- How to protect yourself from vampires

Included are letters from contemporary vampires. You will be shocked and surprised as you discover what these people are really like. Besides learning about the psychic vampire that unintentionally drains you of your energy as well as the intentional psychic vampire, you’ll learn rituals for protection and methods to avoid falling into their clutches.

Vampires finally reveals the truth about the undead. You will be fascinated when you discover who they were and what they are now, and you’ll be grateful when you learn how to protect yourself from them. This is not a book of fantasy and imagination, but of science, history, and spirituality.

The Myths Persist

“But you don’t look/act/seem autistic!” I still get this a lot. I have learned to laugh at it, but there seems to be a misconception that I have overcome autism, or that I am less in control of my specific decisions than I really am. These are myths, and the myths persist. Like cockroaches, these false conceptions about autism and autistics continue to give me a headache. They also continue to make a neurotypical person (if you have to ask, you are one) think I am not autistic. I got my diagnosis from the University of California, Los Angeles, where they are serious about autism diagnosis and treatment. I would like to expose the myths that persist about autistic people and my experience with them. How many of these have you fallen for? 

 

Myth 1.  Autistic People Are All Alike / Autistic People Are All Like “Rain Man” or (Insert person here) 

Saying that autistic people are all like this one person or that one person (NO) is just as false and damaging as saying Hispanic people are all illegal immigrants (NO), or that all men are dogs (NO). People often expect “Rain Man” or Temple Grandin when I mention autism. We are all as different as we can be. 

Myth 2.  Autistic People Don’t Have Feelings 

Personally, I have often run out of the room to cry out of anger, sadness or frustration. I have even experienced happiness too intensely at times. Remember, we are processing things different from the neurotypical mind. For example, I do not watch “Real Housewives of…” because it makes me want to hit somebody out of stress or anger. Also, on empathy: I have often cried or felt sad when someone frowns or cries on the TV or movie screen. How much more empathic can I be? 

3.  Autistic People Don’t Build Relationships  

I struggle with this one all the time. I am currently looking for a man to love. I have, in the past, though, had my share of boyfriends, and been praised as a good girlfriend. 

4.  Autistic People Are a Danger to Society 

Here are the most common reasons somebody with autism may strike somebody: 

      1. Frustration - usually after another sign, such as crying or shrieking 

      2. Sensory Overload - This is “fight or flight” response 

      3. Stress - Like the above “Real Housewives” scenario I mentioned 

There is very little action out of malice. However, autistic people are often victims of hate violence. 

5.  All Autistic People Are Savants  

I lost much of my “savanthood” as I became more social, and my speech became more neurotypical, and I became more well-rounded. I used to be a spelling savant, by the way. Does this make me less autistic? Of course not. 

6.  Autistic People Have No Language Skills 

There are some autistic people who talk so much, you can’t get a word in edgewise. While it is true some of us remain nonverbal, most of us eventually learn language, but often at a later age than neurotypicals. 

7.  Autistic People Can’t Do Much of Anything  

This one just burns my biscuits. What if you could draw upon their special interest? I have seen innovative, creative works come out of autistic people since the diagnosis. This is probably where the savanthood myth comes from. Also, saying “My child would never…” is severely disappointing to the child themselves. Also, I held a job down at In-N-Out Burger for SIX YEARS. Not months, YEARS. I was a respected worker among the people there, too. 

8.  Autistic People Do Not Like To Be Touched 

This is one that is usually portrayed in media. Maybe the one who does not like to be touched have a sensory issue. Sensory issues can go the other way, to liking touch a little too much. I love being touched. It has gotten me into trouble in the past. Contact me privately if you want details. 

9.  There is an Autism Epidemic 

When you cast a wider net for fish, you catch more fish. The “epidemic” began at about the same time the criteria for autism spectrum disorders was widened to include atypical and female autistics, plus higher people on the spectrum.  

Why don’t you tell me more myths that seem to pervade your experience with neurotypicals? Or, if you’re neurotypical, ask me if something about autism is myth or fact? We can come to a greater understanding together. 

Humanitarianism, the elevation of the protection of bare life to the highest possible principle of social action, provided post-Cold War globalization with a foundational myth. The claim today that war, too, is a mode of humanitarian action, or even that humanitarian action requires war, not only reveals the inherent violence of any foundational myth. It exposes a world where life itself becomes its own worst enemy. In such a world, in the name of saving individual lives and species life, an endless array of discriminating discourses and technologies fragments human society into countless and shifting categories of life more or less worthy of being lived. The shift from the category of “deserving poor” or “legitimate asylum seeker” to that of “social parasite” or “illegal immigrant” can be as quick as it is imperceptible. Just think of the speed with which heroic Tunisian revolutionaries as well as the victims of human smugglers and slave traders can be left to drown within sight of the shores of Lampedusa. Worthy lives, wasted lives  come and go in a spiral of increasingly arbitrary social triage within which the enemy “live” frightens, titillates, and entertains us until we too enter the zone of indistinguishability and we wage war against ourselves in the name of humanity
—  Laurence McFalls and Mariella Pandolfi, The enemy live: a genealogy