mythology book

Now working ..

Im not so good at doing one project at a time, I’m very fragmentary in organization ;; so I like to work on a bit each then move onto another. Here are some things I’ve been brewing 🌻🌼

Articles + Videos on Sacred Items

Shinto mythology in an easy to read, modern language format with the integrity of original names kept + context and footnotes (inspired by Neil Gaiman’s Norse Mythology book, and the current translation is very antiquated )

Kami-based tarot deck (based off the standard Rider-Waite deck) + articles why I choose which Kami for which card (I originally just wanted to do articles, but I’m thinking maybe a deck would be nice too.
Eg. Pentacles = Magatama, Cups = Mirror, Swords = Still swords lol, and Wands = Gohei…)

Still working on the articles I planned to write back at the start of the year. Its been hectic and I have to proof read + fact check a lot. It takes more time than I thought, but they’re not forgotten.

In the meantime, please feel free to ask me any kind of questions or an email at livingwithkami@gmail.com.

I’ve mostly just been trying to maintain my body and everything at home, the work at the hiromae, dealing with family matters, and medical checks. (Routine medical checks, but a little nerve wracking too)

Plus a big change upcoming I’ve been working on. By Thursday-Friday this week I should know for sure.

Thank you for all your support and kindness! I’m very grateful that I can help others and I can also learn more too. 🍀🌿🌻🌼

What if Atlantis is just a Greek wizarding school.

Muggles originally knew of the island in Ancient Greek times, but then as new spells and magic was created, muggles thought it sank/mysteriously disappeared, after anti muggle spells were cast on the island to hide the school.

I grew up reading books full of folk and fairy tales, the Norse myths included, soaking them and their violence, their humor, their logic, their magic, into my soul. My major was inspired by folk lore and fairy tale, and part of my love for Neil Gaiman has always come from the way the structures of fairy tale weave through and warp in his works, and his incorporation of mythic figures from a full compendium of folk lore figures. Because of that, it was unlikely that I’d have any reaction other than adoration for his new book: a collection and retelling, in his own words, of the main stories of Norse mythology. So it was with little surprise but a lot of happiness that Norse Mythology was as good as I had expected, my first read of the new year as chilly freezing rain fell and my cat curled near my feet. 

Neil Gaiman takes the Norse myths as we know them and retells them in his mysterious, careful writing. He has studied his characters carefully, and Thor’s strength and relative ignorance, Odin’s wisdom, and Loki’s trickery and desire for chaos, all emerge beautifully in this collection. He acknowledges in the introduction that it’s unfortunate that so many tales of the Norse goddesses have been lost, but gives strength and complexity to the female goddesses and giants who appear in his works. The Norse mythology is reborn in a magnificent storytelling voice that makes your heart ache over tales you already knew and jump through tales you hadn’t yet heard. Gaiman knows how to write folklore, and without lengthening the tales, he makes the gods both terrifying and familiar, the stories haunting and funny. He has done his research, but most of all, he just knows how to tell a story, and that’s the most important piece of passing down mythology, something born through oral inheritance over the centuries. Neil Gaiman’s newest literary masterpiece comes out on February 7, 2017. I recommend you pre-order. (As a side-note, it’s also one of the best smelling books I’ve ever held in my hands, and the book design is stunning.) I received this review copy from @wwnorton in exchange for an honest review, and this truly is an honest and happy review.

“The Norse myths are the myths of a chilly place, with long, long winter nights and endless summer days, myths of a people who did not entirely trust or even like their gods, although they respected and feared them.”

“Before the beginning there was nothing—no earth, no heavens, no stars, no sky; only the mist world, formless and shapeless, and the fire world, always burning.”

Thoughts on Patroclus

Friendly reminder that Patroclus should not be remember simply as “Achilles’ bitch”.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus was a little shit. He had the power, the looks and the skills, and he knew it. Not only he excelled at battle; he did it while taunting his enemies all the fucking time cause he was going to win and he knew it.

Friendly reminder that he was the one guy who got to call out on Achilles, something no one else dared to do. In fact, men went to ask him to call out on Achilles because everyone was scared of him. Except for Patroclus.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus had advanced medical knowledge, something extremly rare at the time. He healed many of his friends and comrades during battle. Hadn’t it been for him, many great warriors would have died.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus was loyal to a fault. He was always by Achilles’ side in battle. He never disobeyed Achilles orders. The one time he did, was the time he died.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus was kind and had a soft heart. He cried because while Achilles’ Rage lasted, he wouldn’t let any of his men enter battle, Patroclus included. And while Achilles’ troops were hiding in their ships, the rest of the Greek army got crushed. Patroclus felt so powerless and helpless because he couldn’t do nothing as he saw his comrades dying.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus had a character crisis. He had to decide whether obeying his Lord’s commands and abandoning his friends in battle, or going against his Lord’s wishes and engaging fight.

Friendly reminder that he refused to stay behind like a coward. He chose to enter battle, but since he was a honourable man he told Achilles about it. Friendly reminder that he managed to sway Achilles’ Rage. Friendly reminder that he managed to convince Achilles to let their troops rejoin the war, thus returning the victory to the Greeks.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus was flawed. He committed hubris. He got so battle drunk and was so excited by the prospect of finally ending the war, that he disobeyed Achilles’ direct command not to fight near the walls of Troy, and chased the Troyans back to the limits of the city. To the place Achilles had specifically told him not to go because it would be too dangerous. Friendly reminder that this one flaw is his downfall.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus doesn’t go down without giving one hell of a fight. Friendly reminder that Patroclus was so strong that Apollo (the God that protected Troy and Hector [Troy’s heir to the throne]) had to face him and repel him four times. Four times. A god. If that ain’t badass, then I don’t know what could be. In the fourth time, Apollo got inside Patroclus’ head and made him dizzy. Patroclus fell and Apollo removed him from his armour- Achilles’ armour. Patroclus ended up unprotected, vulnerable and dizzy in the middle of the battle field; so a random dude saw the opportunity and stabbed his back with a spear. But was that enough to make him go down? Oh heck no. The pain snapped him out of the dizziness. Patroclus realized he was in a very troublesome situation so he decided to fall back… but at that moment Hector engaged him in battle. And Patroclus wouldn’t retire from a direct combat, oh heck he wouldn’t. Even though he knew this was probably the way he would die, he fought with his all.

Friendly reminder that lacking his armor, tired from battle, with a spear wound on his back and only Achilles’ sword left as weapon, Patroclus faced Hector, Troy’s greatest warrior and didn’t fear.

Friendly reminder that when Hector sheathed his spear in Patroclos’ stomach, Patroclus thought about the love of his life.

Friendly reminder that with his last breath Patroclus smiled at Hector and told him “You are a dead man. This will be your downfall”. Friendly reminder that until his last moment, he was a little shit.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus is a flawed, well-rounded, badass character and that he deserves so much more than his current position as “Achilles’s love interest”.

Fucking Rick Riordan, man

Magnus Chase: the Hammer of Thor was fucking amazing??? Rick is basically educating the youth on so many topics/issues going on right now: a transgender & gender fluid child of Loki (as his/her mom), some LGBT+ kids being shunned out of their houses and forced to be homeless, racial prejudice in the police system, potential hardships a deaf person could face in a deaf-shaming world, cultural appropriation, human trafficking. Not to mention the hostilities he destroys (like the arranged marriage between Samirah and Amir being the cutest thing, and Sam taking flight lessons). AND PRETTY CLEAR IMPLICATIONS OF SWORD SEX????

I just love how Rick is just like, “fuck the system I’ll put all this shit in a children’s book.” he’s passed caring about what the public might think now that he’s on his bajillionth book. my idol

Book review: Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

He has sipped the mead of poetry, conversed with Mimir, and cavorted with norns. There are no other rational explanations, because otherwise Neil Gaiman might actually - secretly - be a god himself, and I can only suspend my disbelief so far.

It isn’t difficult to argue that Norse myth is easy to present as a continuous story. Much of that reputation is the fault of Snorri Sturluson, the Icelandic poet and politician, who committed a selection of stories (known as sagas) to paper and codified what we now collectively refer to as the Nordic mythos. Retellings of these sagas are rare - you’re more likely to find translations of Sturluson’s work - and it is for that reason that this book is so special.

Gaiman brings his wit and strong character writing, as well as his unashamed love of the mysterious, to an enormously entertaining retelling of his favourite mythological universe. I should mention now: this mythos happens to by my favourite, too - so I’m perhaps, maybe, possibly 100% biased in favour of this book from the very beginning. Speaking of the beginning, that’s precisely where we start: a vibrant, expansive and imagery-rich opening sequence covering the life and death of the giant Ymir and the formation of the nine worlds.

From such lofty heights of literary prose one would, probably, if they were a pessimist, suspect that the writing would necessarily take a quality dip as more characters and events are introduced to the story. I am pleased to report that this is not the case - pleased because this has happened, previously, with other works on the same topic. Grand prose has a habit of giving way to the rote. Gaiman manages to strike the perfect balance between intellectual interest and joyous storytelling. His fiction background, naturally, has helped with this task enormously. 

Best of all are the characterisations of the gods themselves. Thor is a bounty of hard-headed brashness and implacable optimism…when he has Mjollnir, anyway. Odin is a wise and steadfast figure, if perhaps prone to his own brand of trickery. Freya is an unashamed feminist, constantly berating the Aesir for their unthinking folly. Loki is a proud and egotistical problem-solver with delusions of grandeur. Each character, be they god or elf or dwarf or giant (or eagle or wolf or snake) are presented with unique character traits and mannerisms. And to top it off, these gods do not speak in thees and thous: instead, Gaiman treats the gods as if they were real people with extraordinary abilities and responsibilities, and they speak accordingly.

Gaiman collects the best known stories and a few lesser, harder to research myths, and presents them as one cohesive story with an ease that Sturluson couldn’t possibly have dreamed of, and which few academics have replicated. From the beginning to the Ragnarok, the reader is completely transported.

@neil-gaiman has given the world an incredible gift, and we are not worthy.

Should I buy this book? Yes, a thousand times yes.
What do you rate it? 5/5 stars.
Favourite part? Every single time Freya snaps at Loki.

Japanese Ghost & Demons Art of the Supernatural Edited by Stephen Addiss

George Braziller Inc 1985

Scans courtesy of Mark Jiro Okui

(Got a yokai book you’d like to share? Submit it to Jigoku Yeah!)

“Fairies with gossamer wings,
Bring forth beauty, grace and joyful things.
Fairies of the earth are caretakers of our soil, water and trees,
They watch over beautiful creatures such as bears, bunnies and bees.
Fairies ask that you breathe in and appreciate the vantage point from which you stand,
Then trod carefully and respectfully with each intentional step you make across this beautiful land.”

7

So I wasn’t aware that PJatO and HoO had new character art on its wiki??? And omg they’re so gorgeous!!! You can see that they’ve gone through a lot!

left side by Antonio Caparo
right side by @viria

Crossroads
  • Crossroads symbolize the joining of paths the making of decisions. In almost every culture it is a sacred place where rituals are held, offerings are left, and items are disposed of.  
  • Crossroads are sacred to Hecate, Triformis, and Diana. Hecates three ‘faces’ protect each of the different paths. Hecate sees past, present, and future. She rules all places where there are three or more crossroads. Altars are put at the crossroads to leave Hecate offerings and give devotion.  The crossroads are also thought to be protected by Hermes and Diana.    
  • Due to the hatred of witchcraft by the Christians, Witches and burglars alike were hung and buried at the crossroads. Making people believe they are haunted. It is also a place where people supposedly go to sell their soul to the devil.
  • Witches believe the crossroads to be a sacred place where rituals are done and dirt is collected. Spell remains are often buried at the crossroads. It is where interaction with spirits and other worldly forces are heightened. It is a place to contact and leave offerings for spirits. Samhain is celebrated at the crossroads.
  • In the Hoodoo religion, many of their rituals are done at the crossroads.This is also shown in European and African folklore. 
  •  In Africa almost every group has their own Deity that guards the crossroads.
  • Some cultures heal at the crossroads.
  • Faeries aare also found at the crossroads.

 May the moon light your path!

==Moonlight Academy==