mythology ask

greek myth asks
  • zeus: if you could have one power, what would it be?
  • poseidon: do you prefer the ocean or land?
  • apollo: what are your favorite pieces of poetry?
  • aphrodite: do you believe in true love?
  • athena: what are your favorite classic novels?
  • ares: are you a confrontational person?
  • artemis: do you prefer night or day?
  • hera: who makes up your tumblr family?
  • hestia: where do you live or want to live?
  • demeter: do you enjoy nature?
  • persephone: what's your favorite season?
  • hades: do you believe in an afterlife?
  • hephaestus: what do you enjoy making?
  • hermes: where do you want to travel that you've never been before?
  • odysseus: what's your favorite place to travel?
  • echo: what's something you can't stop talking about?
  • narcissus: what's your best trait?
  • icarus: what's your fatal flaw?
  • orpheus: what's your favorite song or type of music?
  • eurydice: what's something you regret?
Thoughts on Patroclus

Friendly reminder that Patroclus should not be remember simply as “Achilles’ bitch”.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus was a little shit. He had the power, the looks and the skills, and he knew it. Not only he excelled at battle; he did it while taunting his enemies all the fucking time cause he was going to win and he knew it.

Friendly reminder that he was the one guy who got to call out on Achilles, something no one else dared to do. In fact, men went to ask him to call out on Achilles because everyone was scared of him. Except for Patroclus.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus had advanced medical knowledge, something extremly rare at the time. He healed many of his friends and comrades during battle. Hadn’t it been for him, many great warriors would have died.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus was loyal to a fault. He was always by Achilles’ side in battle. He never disobeyed Achilles orders. The one time he did, was the time he died.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus was kind and had a soft heart. He cried because while Achilles’ Rage lasted, he wouldn’t let any of his men enter battle, Patroclus included. And while Achilles’ troops were hiding in their ships, the rest of the Greek army got crushed. Patroclus felt so powerless and helpless because he couldn’t do nothing as he saw his comrades dying.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus had a character crisis. He had to decide whether obeying his Lord’s commands and abandoning his friends in battle, or going against his Lord’s wishes and engaging fight.

Friendly reminder that he refused to stay behind like a coward. He chose to enter battle, but since he was a honourable man he told Achilles about it. Friendly reminder that he managed to sway Achilles’ Rage. Friendly reminder that he managed to convince Achilles to let their troops rejoin the war, thus returning the victory to the Greeks.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus was flawed. He committed hubris. He got so battle drunk and was so excited by the prospect of finally ending the war, that he disobeyed Achilles’ direct command not to fight near the walls of Troy, and chased the Troyans back to the limits of the city. To the place Achilles had specifically told him not to go because it would be too dangerous. Friendly reminder that this one flaw is his downfall.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus doesn’t go down without giving one hell of a fight. Friendly reminder that Patroclus was so strong that Apollo (the God that protected Troy and Hector [Troy’s heir to the throne]) had to face him and repel him four times. Four times. A god. If that ain’t badass, then I don’t know what could be. In the fourth time, Apollo got inside Patroclus’ head and made him dizzy. Patroclus fell and Apollo removed him from his armour- Achilles’ armour. Patroclus ended up unprotected, vulnerable and dizzy in the middle of the battle field; so a random dude saw the opportunity and stabbed his back with a spear. But was that enough to make him go down? Oh heck no. The pain snapped him out of the dizziness. Patroclus realized he was in a very troublesome situation so he decided to fall back… but at that moment Hector engaged him in battle. And Patroclus wouldn’t retire from a direct combat, oh heck he wouldn’t. Even though he knew this was probably the way he would die, he fought with his all.

Friendly reminder that lacking his armor, tired from battle, with a spear wound on his back and only Achilles’ sword left as weapon, Patroclus faced Hector, Troy’s greatest warrior and didn’t fear.

Friendly reminder that when Hector sheathed his spear in Patroclos’ stomach, Patroclus thought about the love of his life.

Friendly reminder that with his last breath Patroclus smiled at Hector and told him “You are a dead man. This will be your downfall”. Friendly reminder that until his last moment, he was a little shit.

Friendly reminder that Patroclus is a flawed, well-rounded, badass character and that he deserves so much more than his current position as “Achilles’s love interest”.

Polytheist, pagan and witchy asks

1. How long have you been worshiping?
2. Do you have a deity that is particularly close to you?
3. Whats your favorite tale about your Gods?
4. Do you keep an altar?
5. Do you consider yourself an Oracle?
6. What brought you to your current path?
7. Do you believe in past lives?
8. Do you think plants, animals or stones have spirits?
9. What do you think your afterlife will look like?
10.Who’s your favorite divine power couple?
11. Do you listen to devotional music?
12. What are your views on virginity? Is it worth anything spiritually?
13. What deity do you turn to most in times of trouble?
14. What are your views on dreams? Have they anything to do with divinity or the future?
15. Do you prefer to party and celebrate or quietly observe holidays?
16. Which deity do you find has the biggest sense of humor?
17. What made you choose your religion over any others?
18. Do you have any food or drink that is spiritually important?
19. Do you have any numbers that are spiritually important?
20. Do you believe in fairies, nymphs or nature spirits?

mythological creatures asks
  • dragon: if you could build a hoard of any item, what would it be?
  • siren: are you a flirt?
  • dullahan: what do you fear?
  • satyr: what's your favourite drink?
  • kitsune: if you could choose to change into any animal, which one would it be?
  • lamassu: what are you protective of?
  • succubus: what's your sexuality?
  • gryphon: from where do you draw your strength?
  • werewolf: how do you deal with your inner demons?
  • phoenix: do you do believe in light after death?
  • selkie: ocean or land?
  • harpy: earth or sky?
  • kelpie: ocean or lake?
  • nymph: if you had to inhabit any natural area, where would you choose?
slavic mythology asks
  • Perun: the sky tears open with thunder - are you scared or are you one with the storm?
  • Veles: someone breaks a promise that meant everything to you - what do you do?
  • Jarilo: the spring came and with it the memories - which spring do you remember best and why?
  • Morana: the time of your death has come but you are given a choice - how do you want to go?
  • Mokosh: a plant grows on your grave after you die, carrying a piece of your soul - what plant would it be?
  • Svarog: summer's sun burns your skin and breaks your heart - which summer do you regret the most?
  • Zorja Utrennjaja: you open your eyes to the delicate light of dawn - what is the first thing you think about?
  • Zorja Vechernjaja: the sky is dark and the air sweet - what pleasure do you long for?
  • Leshy: you walk through a forest filled with whispers and hungry eyes - do you stray from the path?
  • Baba Yaga: the night is heavy and bitter - what is the worst nightmare you ever had?
  • Topielec: you wade in water on a quiet evening - is it a lake, a river, or maybe sea?
  • Żmij: you see before you a creature of hundred eyes and sly smiles - do you banish it or befriend it?

Baba Yaga 

Baba Yaga hails from the place where fear and wisdom meet, she straddles the gap between life and death and holds the secret to both.

Also known as Jezda or Jazi Baba, Baba Yaga is an old witch who lives in the forests of Eastern Europe. It is said that her teeth, nose, and breasts made of iron and that her hair is made snakes. She moves through the forest using a mortar and pestle. Her house sits upon chicken legs which allows it to spin around and move. Her fence is made out of the bones of people who have displeased her. Baba Yaga is a very complex women who is thought to be the personification of death as well as having dominion over fertility, fate and nature. She has the gift of prophecy and can impart great wisdom.  If you wish to benefit from the gifts of Baba Yaga you must undertake an arduous journey to her house and then you must survive the tasks Baba Yaga puts forth to test you. 

artistsapprentice  asked:

If you're taking requests, can you please do a myth about one of the primordial Greek gods, like Nyx?

I absolutely can, although maybe not Nyx, as she’s not often the central character in the surviving myths we have, which honestly does not do justice to her role as namesake of my favourite makeup brand. Instead, I have written about the births of Kronos and Zeus, because Nyx makes a fleeting appearance and also most of the gods are primordial (primordial douchebags, am I right? I’m totally right.)

If you don’t fancy reading about nubile oiled men, the importance of good table manners, and the origins of Wolverine from X-Men, feel free to skip by pressing J on your keyboard. Extra context and literary stuff under the cut, as always!

And the Father of the Year Award Goes to Absolutely No-one

Before the world came to be, there was something. We’ll call it Chaos, because that’s what it was called, but it wasn’t like, chaos chaos, like when you’re running late for work and the toaster starts ballsing up and then suddenly the cat’s puking into your shoes and your mother’s phoning to tell you that your father is actually your uncle. It was more of a chasm, like a kind of tangible nothingness, made up of the elements of everything which would later become actual stuff, like the sea and the sky and sprouts, which actually sounds kind of rad, except there was no-one there to appreciate just how poetic it all was.

Except one day, something just kind of happens, and suddenly there’s someone there, and her name is Gaea, and she is the Earth. Like, literally. She is what we would now recognise as a planet. Which is fine. Real women have curves, etc.

Now, at this point, Gaea is just kind of hanging around by herself, when along comes Tartarus, who is the primordial divine personification of a realm of eternal torture and pain and is probably really shit at parties, and Gaea decides that Tartarus isn’t really the ideal best friend. She really can’t imagine having slumber parties with Tartarus and braiding each other’s hair over all the haunting wails of the dead. She’s kind of happy to have company, but being stuck with Tartarus is sort of like when you turn up late to a party and have to hang around by yourself for a while until some white guy with dreads shows up and starts talking about capitalism; it’s slightly better than loneliness, but not much, and also it makes you want to drink more.

So, one day she’s like “it’s kind of lonely here in the middle of nowhere with only a torturous realm for company, this is like living in Wales and frankly I won’t stand for it,” and then bam, she’s not alone anymore, because the void has spat out a new companion and this exceptionally hot dude is standing there, and he’s butt-naked and all toned and curved and probably oiled, because this myth is from Ancient Greece, and Gaea is like “holy buttocks, who in Chaos are you?” and the beautiful man just sighs wearily and says “I’m Eros, and I’m literally here for the sole purpose of making people want to do unspeakable things to one another.” Gaea pseudo-frowns and she’s like “what kind of unspeakable things, because if you mean relentless murder and ceaseless slaughter, then honestly, I think that’s just in my blood, I’m an Ancient Greek deity,” and Eros is like “have you ever wanted to just lie someone down and cover them in chocolate sauce?” and Gaea metaphorically wrinkles her proverbial nose and she’s like “no, that sounds unsanitary and also I’m a planet,” and then Eros clicks his fingers and says “how about now?” and Gaea does this weird little shiver thing, probably dislodging mountains and causing tectonic plates to collide like bodies on a dancefloor, and she’s like “do that again,” and Eros takes a few steps back and he’s all “no offence, but I’m the only other guy here, and I’m really more of a peanut butter guy myself.”

Then Gaea is like “as fantastic as those few moments of delight were, what’s the actual point? Like, why is it so important that people get the urge to do unspeakable things to each other up against barnyard doors? I mean, we were both just sort of born out of the ether with no need for body parts rubbing and touching in any pleasing way whatsoever, so why can’t things just carry on like that? What’s the need for the horizontal tango?” and Eros just shrugs and waves his sculpted arms a bit and says “plot holes, no pun intended.”

After a while, other things start to appear, like night (Nyx) and day (Hemera) and the realm of eternal, unflinching darkness, known as Erebos, and eventually Gaea just gets tired of having all these things floating around her like One Direction fans outside an arena, and so she does the only thing she can do, seeing as privacy screens haven’t been invented yet, and she gives birth to the sky and uses it as a makeshift veil. The sky’s name is Uranus, and, as it turns out, he’s virile as hell, because pretty soon he’s impregnated Gaea, and she gives birth to Oceanus, who is the divine personification of the sea, which means he’s totally wet and basically hates conflict, and then she gives birth to Kronos. Like his brother Oceanus, he’s a Titan, which means that he is part of the race of elder gods, along with their older siblings, including Thea, Rhea, Hyperion and Iapetos, among others, because condoms haven’t been invented yet, and let’s be honest, Uranus is totally the kind of guy who’d pretend that he couldn’t use them for reasons of girth.

Then, because this family isn’t fucked up enough already, Gaea gives birth to three giant monsters, the Hecatoncheires, who all have a hundred hands and fifty heads and can also control storms, which makes me wonder why they cast Halle Berry in X-Men and not just a hideous CGI conglomerate, and then she (Gaea, not Halle Berry) gives birth to three more monsters, each with one eye, called the Cyclopes. When Uranus sees his six new beautiful children, he’s all “wow, those came out of you? They must take after your side of the family,” and Gaea says “technically, you ARE my side of the family, sonsband,” and Uranus is like “shit, yeah, this is probably why incest is frowned upon, isn’t it? Anyway, I think you should just put them all back, to be honest,” and Gaea is like “what do you mean ‘put them all back’?” and Uranus is like “well, you know, back up the ol’ pipe,” and Gaea is like “say ‘pipe’ one more time and I’ll shove something up yours,” nobly resisting the urge to make a pun on his name, but Uranus is like “sorry, can’t hear you, I’m too busy shoving these gigantic monster children back into your womb,” and he’s not even lying.

Obviously, this causes Gaea some Problems, and so she decides that maybe it’s time to get rid of Uranus. When he’s asleep, probably dreaming about changing his name by deed poll, she gathers together all of her children – the ones who aren’t currently rolling around in her uterus, anyway – and she’s all “look, I’m going to level with you here. Your father is a dick. I could do so much better. I deserve Ryan Gosling, not some dude who thinks it’s OK to use my birth canal as a storage locker. I need your help, kids,” and then she takes out this absolutely massive sickle, and she says “this sickle is made of adamant, which is a radical new element that I made for this specific purpose. It’s stronger than Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson after a meal of spinach, and without meaning to blow my own trumpet, it really is the goddamn poodle’s privates. Like, if I were to create my own super powered mutant soldier, I’d probably coat his bones with this shit and maybe make him some awesome claws of the same stuff, because this? This stuff is nearly unbreakable. It’s totally fit for purpose,” and then her kids are like “by ‘purpose’, do you mean that you want us to use that sickle on our father?” and Gaea nods sagely and she’s like “I want you to use it all over him,” and her kids confer with one another, drawing some diagrams and making detailed notes, and then they turn back to her and say in unison “nope.”

Except they don’t say it completely in unison, because Kronos, the youngest of her Titan children, pipes up like “I know what needs to be done, grandma-mother,” and Gaea says “do you?” and Kronos nods and says “I do. I know exactly what you want me to do, 100%. I understand your plan completely. I volunteer,” and Gaea places her hand firmly on Kronos’ shoulder and grins and she’s like “grandson-son, let us put our shared plan into action,” and Kronos takes the sickle and he’s like “you can count on me, grandma-mother, I won’t let you down,” and Gaea probably just groans a bit because she’s still full of monster children.

Later that night, Uranus comes over to Gaea for a night of nocturnal naughtiness, and he’s about to cock his leg in a jaunty and arousing manner and be like “let us kiss with tongues, mother-wife,” when he hears this battle cry from behind him, and before he can turn around to see what the fuck is going on, Kronos has leapt on him with this massive sickle, and then Kronos raises the sickle above his big Titan head and brings it down in a swooping arc, right on Uranus’ dick. Like, that’s it. He just cuts it clean off, severing it right at the base, then throws it over his shoulder like salt in the Devil’s face, and Uranus just starts sobbing and says “for a Titan, that really wasn’t tight at all. I knew that having kids would be difficult, but this just absolutely takes the proverbial biscuit,” and he leaves, because there’s not a lot else he can do, really.

When he’s gone, Gaea turns to Kronos and she’s just like “you cut his dick off?” and Kronos nods proudly and says “our plan has come to fruition, mother,” and Gaea rolls her eyes and she’s like “I was thinking more along the lines of ruthless patricide, but I guess your idea also worked,” and Kronos wrinkles his nose and he’s all “what kind of monster would kill their own father? Balls or no balls, I still need the old guy to teach me how to throw a ball, y’know,” and Gaea just rolls her eyes and she’s about to make some remark about how a good father probably wouldn’t shove his kids back inside their mother, when Uranus’ testicles, which have landed in the sea, start to foam, and from the dick foam this beautiful woman emerges, and she’s like “I need two things. Firstly, I need a bath, because honestly, natural childbirth has absolutely nothing on what just happened to me, and secondly, I need a dry martini and a nubile young man,” and Gaea is all “literally who the fuck are you?” and the woman is like “I’m Aphrodite, and I really want to just reiterate that I’m covered in dick foam, so can we keep this conversation as brief as possible, like three seconds max” and Kronos is like “go to Cyprus, there are baths there beyond your wildest dreams,” and Aphrodite goes to Cyprus and presumably bathes in bleach for about three years.

Meanwhile, Uranus, hiding away in shame and anger, mutters under his breath something very sinister, something along the lines of “I hereby prophesy that the end of the Titans shall fall very soon, as they are overthrown by their own treacherous children and punished for their sins, signed Uranus xoxo.”

A whole bunch of time passes, and honestly, what happens next is incredibly complicated and involves more birth scenes than a director’s cut of Alien, but in a nutshell, a whole bunch of gods book a hotel room with each other, producing generations of gods, nymphs and other creatures. Kronos himself marries Rhea, his sister, and the two of them have a whole bunch of children, including Hestia, Demeter, Hera, Poseidon and Hades. Now, you’d think that Kronos, having seen the effect that bad parenting can have on a marriage and indeed a penis, might be a better father to his own kids than Uranus had been to him. You would be wrong. In fact, Kronos takes fatherhood to new lows. Having heard Uranus’ prophecy that he is fated to be overthrown by his own son, Kronos takes a leaf out of his father’s book and decides that the best place for his children is inside their parent. However, unlike Uranus, Kronos doesn’t put them back inside their mother; presumably remembering how THAT had turned out, he puts them inside himself instead, and swallows them whole, barely even tasting them. Honestly, I’m not sure why he didn’t chew them first, but whatever. He doesn’t.

After her brother-husband has eaten five of her children, Rhea begins to get a bit fed up (and honestly, why it took five attempts for her to get sick of this shit, I also have no idea; clearly, neither of them are Parent of the Year). So, when she becomes pregnant for the sixth time, she finds her mother-mother-in-law, Gaea, and she’s like “look, I know that Kronos was always your favourite son because of the time he helped you chop off dad’s dick, but now Kronos is BEING a dick, and I need your help,” and Gaea is like “Kronos stopped being my favourite child the moment he copied his dad and internalised his children. If only he could have taken after his mother more, and been awesome and totally opposed to infanticide. Well, I’ll tell you what; that son you’re carrying is going to save you from a life of matrimonial fatigue, but you have to do a couple of things first,” and Rhea says “just tell me what to do,” and Gaea is like “you have to run away, give birth in a magic cave, and pretend that your son is a rock,” and Rhea just sighs and she’s like “honestly, my kids are probably better inside Kronos’ digestive tract and away from this family unit,” but she does what Gaea asks.

So, when Rhea has given birth to her son – whom she names Zeus, which is a name you may be familiar with – she finds a huge rock and swaddles it, dressing it in a fetching babygro with the motif ‘DADDY’S LITTLE FLESH CHILD, MUMMY’S LITTLE NOT-A-GEODE’ and hands it to Kronos. Kronos takes one look at the rock and says “this baby has my eyes, darling,” and then promptly swallows it whole, completely falling for the trick, believing that he’s swallowed his fifth child. Rhea, presumably wondering if Kronos and the rock have more in common than she first thought, goes off to raise her baby in secret.

After a while, yet more time passes and Zeus grows up into an absolutely strapping young god, all bearded and muscled and, most importantly, not swilling around inside Kronos’ bowels, and Gaea is like “OK, grandson. The prophecy says that you will overthrow your father, so the first thing to do is to make him throw up,” and Zeus is like “why would I do that? When dad overthrew HIS dad, he got to use a phenomenal sickle, and I just get to use a bit of bad ham?” and Gaea says “firstly, you’re right, that sickle was fucking sick, and secondly, your father never chewed his food, and you have a few siblings who are probably very grateful for that, although honestly they’d be a tad less grateful if they’d ever had to sit opposite him at dinner, rather than inside him,” and so Zeus goes off to find Kronos.

When he finds him, he slips him an emetic herb, and Kronos immediately throws up his children, all covered in stomach slime but still alive and fully grown. Zeus is like “hey siblings, I’m Zeus, and honestly, I will never fully comprehend what you have been through, but I hope we can bond over this experience anyway,” and Hades is like “I think there’s a bit of partially digested carrot in my hair,” and Hera says “no, that’s just stomach lining, but you do have something unspeakable on your shoulder,” and Demeter says “thanks for saving us, Zeus, but dad looks super pissed that you just made him throw up his children,” and Kronos mutters “and that great bit of roast ham that I had for lunch.”

Zeus just shrugs and he’s like “well, there’s this prophecy which says that dad’s going to look defeat right in the face very soon and I’m going to be the one who puts it there, so honestly, I’m going to just let him have this one. I’d probably be angry too, if someone gave me a prophecy which told me that my child would overthrow me and I subsequently internalised that child for my own protection and suzerainty, only to have the child break free from my body somehow. Boy, that would really blow.“

Glaring at his family, just about managing to speak through his anger, Kronos snarls “you know what this means, son?” and Zeus sets his jaw into a rigid line, pushes his shoulders back so that his biceps look particularly rugged in his favourite white tank top, and then he digs into the pocket of his skinny black jeans and pops a tooth-pick into his mouth, chewing it with a pensive look on his face, and after a few tense seconds have passed, during which Kronos is just clenching his fists and trembling with unspent fury, Zeus says “yes, dad. This means war.”

My other retellings can be found here; my mythology blog is here; and my Mythology Mondays Facebook page is here. Thrilling.

(Keep reading link for mobile, as the app breaks the link)

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Random Nico Headcanons

Based on a post by @writing-central

You can request these for any other character:) Feel free to ask.


• his opinions about boys: he likes them obviously but being very committed, he doesn’t let his eyes wander when in a relationship (will appreciates this)

• His opinion towards girls: he’s had two sisters and many female friends so he respects the gender very much but he doesn’t appreciate when girls come up to him and are forward despite them knowing he’s into dudes

• his type: is the beach babe sort of guy, and he doesn’t get it. He isn’t even close to being sporty so he doesn’t know where it came from but it does explain why he liked Percy and Will consecutively

• the meaning of life: for him is to live the life that the people who died never got to live. He’s had many friends and family who died at young ages and he wants to avenge them

• nightmares: they’re are getting better thanks to the sleeping medicine that Will has him on, and he’s stopped taking it recently and still getting good sleep but he remembers how horrible they had been and that they’re the source of his dark circles

• The best flavor of chap stick: in his opinion is the strawberry Fanta lip smacker that Will once borrowed from Kayla. He had to refrain himself from kissing Will every two seconds and just to be annoying, Will has now started to wear it on a daily basis

• Inappropriate stuff? Nope, this child is one hundred percent pure thanks to Maria and Bianca’s brought up but he does let his mind wander to sex once in a while. He also had to get the talk from a homosexual point of view (thanks to Will). But that was really awkward since he’s dating Will.

• family: He considers the camps his family now, and of course Hazel. But in his heart, Maria and Bianca will never be replaced and Hazel understands this since it’s the same for Marie Levesque

•Plans for the future: they’re interesting because he really doesn’t know what he wants to do. In the end, he did end up settling between literature or psychology.

• The weirdest dream he’s had: it will always be the popcorn one he had when he was a corn plant. Never has he been so afraid of popcorn

• Vine: thanks to Lester’s big mouth, he was introduced to some modern platforms like vine and Snapchat but he doesn’t use them because of the whole demigod not supposed to have phones thing

• Spongebob: Will made him watch it when they were finding out Nico’s hobbies, but he ended up liking anime way more (he doesn’t understand how a starfish has EYES)

• Aliens: some campers decided it would be funny to tell him that when he was in Lotus, aliens had invaded the earth for a bit but he didn’t buy that because he’d done his research

• Harry Potter: despite a lot of Headcanons saying that he would like Harry Potter, I beg to differ. He would probably not be a fan of another magical world since he’s already had enough and next thing he knows the camp is being attacked by Voldemort

• The end of the world: he feels as if he’s come close to it a few times and yet he’s still alive so he perceives it as something more horrible than anything he’s suffered through

• death: it makes him feel slightly depressed which is strange coming from a son of Hades but it’s a flaw that he has but he doesn’t mind

• School: I like to think Nico tried public school but it was too much for him so Chiron allowed him to take private lessons in camp since he hadn’t been exposed to mortals very much after Lotus

• The best superpower: according to him, if he could have another one, would be bringing the dead back without consequences

• Pet peeves: they include close minded people and people who have no sense of personal space

• Who he’d sell his soul to save: at this point, it would narrow down t Hazel because of the personal relationships he has with her but there’s many other people he’s save so he can’t answer this one

• Poetry: he used to like it until Will started telling his horrible poetry smh

• Religion: he came from a strongly catholic family (thus his hesitation to come out) but he’s more of someone who doesn’t particularly practice religion but does sometimes pray

• Coke vs Pepsi: Will hates him for it but he likes sprite more than both and doesn’t drink coke if there’s alternatives. Poor Will, he loves his coke that Texan

•The worst pain they’ve ever felt : Tartarus.

•Fears: strangely, it’s darkness. Being a son of Hades he should’ve been more accepting of it but the dark makes him uncomfortable Enough to wake up and go to the Apollo cabin’s bathroom

• Childhood hopes: he always wanted to be a pirate

• What if plants had feelings? As someone who has been a plant before, he’s a strong believer of this


Again, you can ask for any other characters

manic-entity  asked:

Do you know of any kinds of mermaids or sirens or other sea dwellers in Norse myth? (If there's two things I love, it's mermaids and Norse myth)

Sæl,

Off the top of my head, I cannot think of specific mermaids in Norse mythology. I can, however, recall that there is a Danish fairytale from which Disney made “The Little Mermaid,” and that is called the same thing in Danish: Den lille havfrue. You can read a translation of that for free by following the link.

Yet, there are plenty of sea-related beings and figures in Norse mythology. I am not familiar with specific creatures, like mermaids or sirens, but there are a lot of figures who may fit those roles. After all, Scandinavia has always been a place that had close connection with seafaring. I won’t be able to cover them all, but I can speak of and mention a few of these sea-related figures, at the very least.

As for my sources, you may see them below. All the page numbers listed throughout this post correspond to footnote 1.(1.)

I will start with the major figures, which are two gods that have very strong connections to the sea. There may be others, but I will just limit the discussion to those which are most prominently sea-based. The two gods that I speak of are Njörðr (Njord) and Ægir.


Njörðr (Njord):

Njord is a Vanir, and he is mentioned by Snorri more directly (that is, not just in the Skáldskaparmál section). Here is what is said about him:

“He lives in heaven in a place called Noatun (Enclosure of Ships). He rules over the motion of wind and moderates sea and fire. It is to him one must pray for voyages and fishing. He is so rich and wealthy that he can grant wealth of lands or possessions to those who pray to him for this.” (23)

There is more about him later in this text, in a section called Skáldskaparmál, which is about poetic dictation:

“How should Njord be referred to? By calling him the god of chariots or descendant of Vanir or a Van and father of Freyr and Freyja, the giving god.” (75)

I tend to see Njord as pertaining more to the riches of the sea. In other words, he, perhaps, represents the reward that the sea offers people; control of the sea and its resources would bring great wealth.

There is more, but that mostly pertains to how he came to be included among the Æsir, or other stories that he is a part of, but not playing a central role in. Ægir on the other hand, of whom we will shortly speak, is perhaps even more associated with the ocean than Njord.


Ægir (Also called Hler or Gymir):

He is generally considered to be the god of the sea, and he is best known for his feast with the Æsir (which goes badly thanks to an eagle that was actually a giant). Him and another god, one named Bragi, talk in great length about the details of poetry. Anyway, Ægir lives on an island, according to Skáldskaparmál, which is called Hlesey. For the most part, Ægir seems to play more of an ‘asker’ role in this text, asking Bragi questions and providing an opportunity for an explanation that will help the reader learn about poetics and mythology. 

Although Snorri (the author of this source I am discussing) kind of negates Ægir’s role quite a bit, once we look into the ways that the sea itself can be poetically referred to, it is obvious that he has strong connections with the sea.

Ægir is actually used as a personification for the ocean or sea at times. Note that these are where his three names come from. For example, this is from Skáldskaparmál:

“What terms for sea are there? It is called mere, ocean (ægir), engulfer (gymir), roarer (hler), main, road, depth, salt, water, swell.” (139)

To quote the poet Arnor:

“Let the court learn how the keen-spirited king of earls pursued the sea, the irresistible prince did not cease to oppose the ocean.” (139)

To quote the poet Ref:

“Gymir’s spray-cold spae-wife (Ran) often brings the twisted-rope-bear (ship) in Ægir’s (Ocean’s) jaws when the wave breaks.” (91)

Here, too, is a portion of a poem in Old Norse containing a reference to Ægir as the ocean:

Alfas began verr ægis
ítr báls haai málu;

The splendid hater of the fire of the sea (he who likes to rid himself of gold, the generous prince) defend the beloved pf the enemy of the wolf (Odin’s wife Jord-earth or land); (168)

Furthermore, Ægir has nine daughters with his wife Ran. Here are their names:

  1. Himinglæva (Heaven-bright)
  2. Dufa (Dip)
  3. Blodughadda (Blood-haired)
  4. Hefring (Lifting)
  5. Unn (Wave)
  6. Hronn (Wave)
  7. Bylgia (Billow)
  8. Drofn (Comber)
  9. Kolga (Cold One)

Ran (Ægir’s wife):

I am doing this an edit, so I shouldn’t really do too much to change the original post (since some won’t see the edits), but Ran should be considered on her own and not always associated through Ægir. After all, she is considered to be a goddess in her own right, so she ought to be given that respect. 

@bewareimfrench suggested that Ran could be a suitable candidate for a mermaid, and that honestly may not be a far stretch because she is equally as associated with the ocean as Ægir is. Here is a poem of her personified:

Segl skekr of hlyn–Huglar–
(hvast drífa skip) rasta,
en föll–of gram–Gylli
grunn (djúp) hata unna.
Rán viðr hafhreinum
háraust–skapar flaustum–
(hrönn fyrir húfi þunnum
heil klofnar) frið–deilu.

Sail shake above the prince on the current-maple (ship); tall ships drive keenly; the shallows near Hugl are dangerous to the waves’ horse (ship). Noisy Ran does not create peace for the sea-deer (ships); she causes conflict for cruisers, the entire wave breaks before the slender bow. (180)

I must say, though, that she is not an evil figure, even though that poem may seem a bit negative. It does show, however, that she has considerable power.


There is also Jormungandr (also called the Midgard Serpent):

Jormungandr is a giant serpent who is a child of Loki’s and the giantess Angrboda. This is said about Jormungandr:

“…[Odin] threw the serpent into that deep sea which lies round all lands, and this serpent grew so that it lies in the midst of the ocean encircling all lands and bites on its own tail.” (27)

Jormungandr is involved in a few stories, such as being magically disguised as a giant’s cat that Thor could not pick up or also Thor’s fishing trip with a giant named Hymir. Jormungandr is often used poetically to refer to both Thor (because Jormungandr is arguably Thor’s greatest foe, besides giants in general) and Loki (the father of such a creature).


There are also figures known as Sea-Kings and these are their names:

I believe that most of these names don’t refer to actual deities, but rather famous semi-historical figures (namely Vikings) that came to be used to refer to the ocean and sea. A Viking, after all, is a king of the sea, for it is the sea that guide a Viking to treasure and wealth (and perhaps Njord guides them to this as well, since it is treasure they seek).

“Atli, Frodi, Ali, Glammi, Beiti, Ati and Beimuni, Audmund, Gudmund, Atal and Gestil, Geitir, Gauti, Gylfi, Svendi.

Gæir, Eynef, Gaupi and Endil, Skekkil, Ekkil, Skefil and Solvi, Half and Hemlir, Harek and Gor, Hagbard, Haki, Hraudnir, Meiti.

Hiorolf and Hraudung, Hogni, Mysing, Hunding, Hviting, Heiti, Mævil, Hialmar, Moir, Hæmir, Mævi, Rodi, Rakni, Rer and Leifi.

Randver, Rokkvi, Refiner, Leifnir, Næfil, Ræfil, Nori, Lyngvi, Byrvil, Kilmund, Beimi, Iorek, Iosmund, Thvinnil, Yngvi, Teiti.

Virfil, Vinnil, Vandil, Solsi, Gautrek and Hun, Giuki, Budli, Homar, Hnefi, Horvi, Sorvi. I can see no more sea-kings.” (155)

These name often appear in poetry, especially in Icelandic sagas. Here is an example from Brennu-Njáls saga, and now you will understand the reference (I have bolden their names):

The shaping gods drove ashore
the ship of the keeper of bells (Thangbrand);
the slayer of the son of the giantess (Thor)
smashed Bison on the sea-gull’s rest (sea);
no help came from Christ
when the sea’s horse (ship) was crushed;
I don’t think God was guarding
Gylfi’s reindeer (ship) at all.

Thor drove Thangbrand’s beast (ship)
of Thvinnil far from its place;
he shook and shattered
the ship and slammed it ashore;
never will that oak (ship) of Atal’s field
be up to sea-faring again;
the storm, sent by him (Thor),
smashed it so hard into bits.
(2.)


And lastly, these are the various ways to which the sea or ocean can be referred to, poetically speaking (Kennings). 

Most we have discussed in some manner, but such references give interesting insight into the figures of Norse mythology that are actually associated with the sea (I have bolded names of personified figures):

“How shall sea be referred to? By calling it Ymir’s blood, visitor to the gods (Ægir), husband of Ran (Ægir), father of Ægir’s daughters (Ægir),…, land of Ran and of Ægir’s daughters and of ships and of terms for sea-ship, of keel, steam, planks, strake, of fish, ice, sea-kings’ way and roads, no less ring of the islands, house of the sands and seaweed and skerries, land of the fighting-tackle and of sea-birds, of sailing wind.” (91)

“What terms for sea are there? It is called mere, ocean (ægir), engulfer (Gymir), roarer (Hler), main, road, depth, salt, water, swell.” (139)

“Sea, every-lying, salt, ocean (Ægir), main, wetness, swim, flat one, dead calm and bay, resounding, overhang, emptiness, brawler, rocker and mere, sucker, suck, same, swallower, maelstrom and fjord.

Sound, creek, good passage, fluid and expanse, tempest, depth, breaker, dark, flood and surf, swell sparkler, engulfer (Gymir) and flower, rumbler and unquiet, surge, fen, snatcher.

Crashing, wake, league, fishing-ground, inlet and fishing-bank, water, deep and submersion, cove, tarn and canal, storm, ditch, pool, current, stream and brook, channel, spring, fount, eddy, waterfall and firth.

Herfring (lifting), roller, white one and offing, Hronn (wave), Ran (plunderer), Kolga (cold one) and Himinglæva (heaven-bright), Drofn (comber), Unn (wave) and sweller, Dufa (dip), Bylgia (billow), shoal and bore, Bloughadda (bloody-haired). (160-1)


Of course, I have by no means have covered everything (even what I have covered is only a summary of what is actually said), but that should give you more than enough of an idea about the role of the sea, and related figures/  creatures, in Norse mythology. I hope this has been interesting! I enjoyed researching the information for you.

Vera vitur og reika langt.
(Be wise and wander far.)


FOOTNOTES:

1. Snorri Sturluson, Edda, Anthony Faulkes trans. (repr., 1987; London: J.M. Dent, 1995). You may also read this for free online via Viking Society for Northern Research.

2. Robert Cook trans., Brennu-Njáls saga, in The Complete Sagas of Icelanders, vol. 3, edited by Viðar Hreinsson, Robert Cook, Terry Gunnell, Keneva Kunz, and Bernard Scudder. (Reykjavík: Leifur Eiríksson Publishing, 1997), 125.

Percy Jackson/Mythology Themed Asks
  • Percy: How do you feel about swimming? Being on the water?
  • Annabeth: Are you satisfied with your smarts/grades?
  • Bianca: How much would you give for others to make them happy?
  • Zoe: How updated is your language?- how cool are you with the kids?
  • Nico: Biggest fear?
  • Thalia: What is your home?
  • Grover: How important is the earth to you?
  • Luke: Do you have feelings no one would expect of you?
  • Ethan: What would you give up for your biggest dream?
  • Piper: Do you think your pretty- do others think your pretty?
  • Jason: Do you keep your promises?
  • Leo: What's your element?
  • Reyna: What's your type of strong?
  • Frank: Favorite animal?
  • Hazel: Favorite gem?
  • Rachel Dare: What's your art?
  • Chiron: What makes a hero?
  • Hera: Are you easily jealous?
  • Zeus: Are you a good leader?
  • Athena: What's your fatal flaw?
  • Hermes: Godly parent/ CHB cabin?
  • Aphrodite: What's your sexuality?
  • Hestia: Who is part of your family?
  • Hades: Opinon on afterlife?
  • Hephaestus: Could you love someone even if they don't look good?
  • Artemis: If you could- would you join the huntresses? How do you feel on immortality?
  • Apollo: Favorite song/ line?
  • Ares: How easily are you angered?
  • Mr D: What's something about you that people wouldn't assume?
  • Demeter: Green thumb? Or do you kill all plants you touch?
  • Ambrosia and nectar: What would ambrosia and nectar taste like for you?
  • Prophecy: Do you believe in fate?
  • Pandora's box: Are you good at keeping your hopes up?
  • Camp Jupiter: Which camp would you choice to be in?
  • Camp Halfblood: Which camp WOULD you be in?
2

Modern Worshippers: Hel [Requested by Anon]

Quietly watching with bones around their neck, in their ears, on their clothes that softly clink. They’re surprisingly wonderful hosts, having a quick recipe or two on hand to whip up should someone come over. They go to funerals of people who had no one left, leaving white roses to bloom. Never making a fuss, screaming or wailing. They know the end comes no matter what you do and the finality is a soothing comfort, sharpening the importance of every action while they are alive.

Because She will always get what is Her due.

du-ich-jeder  asked:

Greetings friend,it is told That odin wanders among us. Do you have some source(s) That descripes those interactions? I know all the ones from the poetic and snorri edda, yet i am not satisfied. I love your blog and respect your knowledge a lot:)

Velkominn (eða velkomin), vinur,
(Welcome, friend,)

It has indeed been told that Óðinn wanders far in his quest for knowledge, and that he wanders to test the hospitality of us all. I understand how you would feel unsatisfied by the Eddic material, because I do not think that it has much to say about his wanderings. I do know of a few sagas, though some of these are contained (in some form, whether a summary or a poetic edition) in the Eddas, so perhaps they won’t be completely new for you, in which case I do apologize for not being able to follow up on that request.

Óðinn’s wandering stories tend to involve him interacting with heroes under a different name. After all, he wanders to test their hospitality, but also to give them advice and test their ‘loyalty’ in certain cases. If they fail to treat him well, he denies the hero and his companions their victory. I was planning to summarize the sections from these stories for you by retelling them in a fun way, but I wouldn’t want to spoil anything if you would prefer to read it yourself first in context. So, I have just listed them instead. I have been able to provide more information this way, though, so that will prove even more helpful for you. I have also included links of where you can read these texts.


Óðins ferðir. (Odin’s Journeys.)*

* Of course, I am not going to be able to cover them all. How could anyone keep up and catalogue his vast wanderings? Needless to say, Óðinn often goes by many names, and thus it can be challenging to pick him out in the literature (and that is a considerable undertaking for just one man to make). So, this list should at least expose you (and other folk interested in the wandering one) to reading material beyond the Eddas. In other words it is a start, but not a complete list by any means.

  • Gautreks saga, or “the Saga of King Gautrek”
    • Chapters 1 through 2: It is not for certain (in fact just my own speculation), but I feel that the figure King Gauti might be Óðinn in this saga. 
      • (In another saga called Bosi and Harraud, Óðinn is said to be his father. It is a bit complicated, but, whether actually Óðinn or not in this particular case, he is very similar to him and, in my opinion, that makes this worth reading in such a context).
    • Chapters 4 through 7: Here Óðinn appears as Grani Horsehair.
  • Sögubrot:
    • Chapters 8 and 9: Here Óðinn appears as Bruni
      • Although, I should point out that the translation I use does not explicitly make the connection known (Saxo’s History states this being the case, though). 
  • Volsunga saga, or “The Saga of the Volsungs”:
    • Chapters 1 through 2: Here Óðinn appears as himself, as he guides his son Sigi from the ‘underworld’ and helps to begin the Volsung dynasty.
    • Chapter 3: Now he appears as an old man.
    • Chapter 10: Now he appears briefly as a mysterious man.
    • Chapter 11: He appears as a man in a black cloak, but in the midst of a battle with his spear.
    • Chapter 13: Óðinn appears now as an old man with a long beard.
    • Chapter 14: Óðinn appears as himself again. This should be familiar, because it is told in the Prose Edda (Skáldskaparmál).
    • Chapter 17: Here Óðinn appears as an old man again (Fjolnir, but also Feng and Hnikar).
    • Chapter 18: Óðinn returns as an old man with a long beard.
    • Chapter 21: He again appears as himself (as well as Hropt, aka Roftar) and speaks with Brynhildr.
    • Chapter 44: Óðinn briefly appears as a one-eyed man, tall and ancient.
  • Ynglinga saga:
    • Chapters 2 through 9: This may not be what you are looking for exactly, but Óðinn appears here as playing a very earthly role. He appears as himself, but Snorri does not depict him as a god (at this point), but rather a very prominent figure of a distant historical past. 
      • He is referred to again later, but he does not actually appear.

Other Appearances:

Óðinn plays a role in Ragnars saga Loðbrókar, at least in the AM 147 4to version, but that one is less complete than the NkS 1824b 4to version, which is used in the translation that I have. In that version, though, Óðinn appears disguised as an old man named Roftar (ON: Hroptr), and he healed Sigurd, Ragnar’s son, of a festering wound. To return the favor, Sigurd would dedicate all those he slays in battle to Óðinn. Also, it was Óðinn (in this version) who is responsible for Sigurd’s snake-like markings by sprinkling dust in his eyes, and that gave him his nickname Sigurd Snake-in-the-eye


Again, I wish to point out that I have definitely forgotten some of his wanderings in the list above. I have done my best, however, to provide the most that I could think of or locate, so I do hope that you and other find this post helpful! This post actually acts as a bit of a weak peak for a bigger project that I have been working on. Anyway, thank you kindly for asking! I do apologize for taking awhile to answer back, but it took me some time to gather the resources together.

Vera vitur og reika langt.
(Be wise and wander far.)

4

when asked about their love lives, the women of greek mythology responded thus //

this is by far my most popular poem and i realized i never posted anything more than the initial run. it grew into a bit of a beast, so here’s the edited rest of it.

Things NOT To Do When You Meet an Actual Witch
  • say, “so wait… you think magic is real?”
  • or “do you have a mental illness?”

  • *insert comment about how we’re “childish” for believing here*

  • Have you ever cursed someone?? (this puts someone in a position where they feel like they have to justify it if they did, and sometimes there are stories people just don’t want to tell

  • Say something that implies Christian superiority

  • Tell a christo-witch (Christian witch) that practicing witchcraft invalidates their identity as a Christian

  • Tell a Pagan witch that they can’t follow a pantheon because it’s “already been labeled as mythology”

  • Ask them to do magic right now, on the spot (There are days I don’t want to do magic or can’t really feel my own magic, especially if I’m out of practice/have been too busy)

  • demand they do things that are very clearly not possible. (Do you have ANY clue how powerful someone would have to be to move something? APPARENTLY NOT!)

  • explain to them in detail why you think their beliefs are invalid

  • treat them like doing witchcraft means they’re morally abhorent