mythological dogs

Name: Barghest, Barguest

Area of Origin: Northern England

Prevalent in Northern English folklore, the Barghest is a monstrous black dog, with fiery eyes, large teeth and claws, though the name has been known to refer to ghosts or household elves in other regions of the country. The word “Ghost” was pronounced “Guest” in Northern England, and the etymology of Barghest is thought to be the combination word, Burh-ghest or “Town-Ghost”. Similar to other mythical Black Dogs like the Black Shuck, Grim, Padfoot, Gwyllgi and Gytrash, the Barghest is believed to be an omen of death, foretelling the passing of an individual by laying on or near their doorstep. In some tales, the dog is but one form the entity can shapeshift into, with other appearances being that of a headless man or woman, a white cat or a rabbit. They are said to attack lone travelers in the countryside as well as the narrow alleys in those of the old English cities.

Pricolici aesthetic

Romanian folklore creatures series - III

Pricolici, similar to strigoi (troubled spirits of the dead rising from the grave), are undead souls that have risen from the grave to harm living people. While a strigoi possesses anthropomorphic qualities similar to the ones it had before death, a pricolici always resembles a wolf or a dog. Malicious, violent men are often said to become pricolici after death, in order to continue harming other humans. Sometimes “sin children” (from incest) become pricolici after they die.

“If Orpheus first produced the waltz.”  Color process illustration by Arthur Rackham for The Ingoldsby Legends, written by Thomas Ingoldsby, (Richard Harris Barham), and published in 1907.