mypublicland

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The superbloom has migrated north to California’s Central Valley, and the show is simply indescribable at Carrizo Plain National Monument. The Valley floor has endless expanses of yellows and purples from coreopsis, tidy tips and phacelia, with smaller patches of dozens of other species. Not to be outdone, the Temblor Range is painted with swaths of wildlflowers in oranges yellow and purple like something out of a storybook. Visitors are flocking to the area to see this explosion of color, and travelers should be prepared with a full tank of gas as there are no services in the monument. Photos by Bob Wick, Bureau of Land Management (@mypubliclands).

On this day in 2001, Carrizo Plain (CA), Sonoran Desert (AZ), Pompeys Pillar (MT), Upper Missouri River Breaks (MT) and Kasha-Katuwe (NM) National Monuments were designated by Presidential Proclamation.

Pictured here, the #milkyway over North Maricopa Wilderness in the Sonoran Desert National Monument, a part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands.

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Public Lands/ Exploration/ Night Sky/ 

Searching for a meteor burst last night in the Bald Hills above Redwood creek in Redwood National Park.  

I had visions of a Meteor burst behind this fire tower, if you zoom in a few images have a faint line or two, but overall every time I would place and focus the lens the meteors would then show up in a different part of the sky.

*note on editing:
I find it difficult to edit night photos. It’s a tough call between taking all of the amazing colors the long exposure captures, and trying to portray the scene more closely to the way I experienced it. I always find that to my eyes it looks more silvery blue, but the camera often finds many colors. Last nights photos out of camera had amazing greens, purple and blue which to people viewing the photos might be more interesting. But that’s not how it felt to be there alone in the dark walking in starlight.  Maybe I’ll share an alternate edit at another time.

An eagle flies through a rainbow as a storm clears one of the many small islands on Lake Vermilion. The fifth largest lake in Minnesota, Lake Vermilion contains over 75 small public land islands covered with birch, pine and spruce. Some of the islands have boat-in campsites, and many are only large enough for one site, ensuring that you can have an entire island to yourself!    The Bureau of Land Management works with the Bois Forte Band of Ojibwe (also referred to as Chippewa) to protect traditional-use areas and cultural sites on the islands. The lake is popular for fishing and contains a diversity of species including largemouth bass, muskellunge, northern pike and perch. Photo by Bob Wick, (@mypubliclands) Bureau of Land Management.

flickr

Milky Way Over Mono Lake From Bodie Hills by Jeff Sullivan

Did you see yesterday’s solar eclipse? People gathered in large groups at public lands across the country to witness this amazing natural phenomenon. Herd Lake at Jim McClure-Jerry Peak Wilderness in Idaho was in the zone of totality and visitors enjoyed a great show. Photo by Bob Wick, Bureau of Land Management (@mypubliclands).

Wildflowers carpet the hillside at Gila Box Riparian National Conservation Area. The 23,000-acre area is truly an oasis in the desert with four perennial waterways that are the lifeline for this remarkable place. The Gila River canyon section, known as the Gila Box, is composed of patchy mesquite woodlands, mature cottonwoods, sandy beaches and grand buff-colored cliffs. Bonita Creek – popular for birdwatching, hiking and picnicking – is lined with large cottonwoods, sycamores and willows. Cliff dwellings, historic homesteads, Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep and over 200 species of birds make this year-round watery Arizona spot worth the drive. Photo by @mypubliclands.

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THANKS FOR FOLLOWING THE #MYPUBLICLANDSROADTRIP AT THE NATIONAL INTERAGENCY FIRE CENTER OR NIFC!

This past week our @mypubliclands Instagram account shared photos of and from BLM firefighters - we are beyond thankful for their hard-work and service! Thanks for following this week and learning more about NIFC.

View the NIFC roadtrip journal-storymap here: http://mypubliclands.tumblr.com/roadtripnifc.

For beauty off the beaten path, venture two hours southwest of Albuquerque, New Mexico to the Sierra Ladrones Wilderness Study Area. There are no trails through the area’s diverse landscapes of high mountain peaks, isolated canyons and badlands. Hiking to the top of Ladrones Mountain – pictured here during a storm – rewards visitors with stunning panoramic views of the area’s mesa grasslands and piñon-juniper woodland. Photo by Julie Aguirre, Bureau of Land Management (@mypubliclands).

Check out this peaceful scene at Table Rock Wilderness in Oregon for International Day of Forests. See old growth Douglas fir and western hemlock along four terrific trails as you hike up to the “fortress” of Table Rock. Breathe in the rich, forest air and remember the poem by Robert Frost, “The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep. And miles to go before I sleep. And miles to go before I sleep.” Photo by Bureau of Land Management, @mypubliclands.

What better place to relax than Easy Chair Crater in Nevada? Located along Lunar Crater National Back Country Byway, Easy Chair Crater doesn’t have anything to do with the moon. It’s origins lie deep within the Earth. Formed by a cinder cone volcano, it is littered with evidence of its violent past – cooled lava bombs and volcanic crystals. Photo by Chip Caroon, Bureau of Land Management (@mypubliclands).

Today we’re celebrating our national bird, the bald eagle, for American Eagle Day. On June 20, 1782, the bald eagle was placed at the center of the Great Seal of the United States and remains a symbol of our proud country. After a dramatic recovery, bald eagles are found in every state but Hawaii, soaring high and inspiring the nation. Photo from the Gulkana Wild and Scenic River in Alaska by Bob Wick, Bureau of Land Management (@mypubliclands).

It used to be much harder to send a selfie. In the 1860s, riders carried the mail from Missouri to California – covering 1,800 miles in 10 days. Today, visitors can explore sections of this famous mail route along the Pony Express National Historic Trail and learn about the challenges faced by the young men who kept the coasts connected. It might have been dangerous work, but you couldn’t beat the views. Photo from a section of the trail in Utah by Bob Wick, Bureau of Land Management (@mypubliclands).