mygifs: gallagher brothers

8

“How has success changed Liam? I ask. The glass is two inches thick. It’s soundproof. But as if by telepathy, Liam turns toward me. He stares right at me and, after a moment’s pause, gives me the thumbs-up sign. “He’s become more mad,” says Noel. “He’s totally fuckin’ mental. He lives in….” He laughs to himself. “He lives in this weird-bizarre-bizarre concept.” Noel gets a truly mystified look in his eyes. I ask him to explain the concept. “If I could explain that concept to you, mate, I’d bottle it, and I’d fuckin’ sell it, and I’d be even richer than I am now.” At this point he notices that my eyes are darting nervously over his shoulder, and he turns to look. Liam’s attention has wandered off to the vaguely apocalyptic scene outside and below. It is an appropriately regal view, regal not in the sense of gowns and crowns and pomp and circumstance but of the stuff that gets you all of that, regal in the Genghis Khan, Attila the Hun sense of conquering. Noel sees him, chuckles, turns back to me, and takes a serious nibble on his index finger. Liam’s arrival has changed the chemistry, as ever. “I love the geezer,” he says. ‘I love him. And I don’t say that just because he’s my brother. He makes me laugh. He’s so surreal.’ “ – SPIN, October 1997.

THE ORIGINAL WONDERWALL COVER

“Noel wanted a picture of someone framed. I had originally shot Liam for the front cover of Wonderwall in Primrose Hill, London, but Noel had accidentally stumbled across us doing the shoot on the way to Creation Records. I can remember a bloke jumping out of a black cab and yelling at us through the railings of the park. I thought it was an Oasis fan heckling us, so I ignored all the shouting and continued with the shoot. The shouting continued so I finally decided to tell this bloke to leave us alone and then realised to my astonishment that the bloke was in fact Noel Gallagher. He explained that Wonderwall was ‘a fucking love song’ and that no way was ‘our kid’ appearing on the front cover. The shoot was quickly aborted and in the end I re-shot it the following day with a girl from Creation Records called Anita Heyert. I used the same black and white infra-red effect on this cover as I did on Live Forever.”

Michael Spencer Jones, the photographer who worked on the Morning Glory-era sleeve art.