this is my destiny: to put my son on the throne of england, and those who laughed at my visions and doubted my vocation will call me my lady, the king’s mother. i shall sign myself margaret regina, margaret the queen.

22 August 1485: Henry Tudor and his Lancastrian forces defeat Richard III’s Yorkist army at the Battle of Bosworth Field and end the War of Roses.


‘There is a wonderful roughness on the skin, and I put my hand down and pull up my nightgown to see both knees, and they are the same: roughened and red. Saints’ knees, praise God, I have saints’ knees, I have prayed so much, and on such hard floors, that the skin of my knees is becoming hard, like the callus on the finger of an English longbowman. I am not yet ten years old, but I have saints’ knees. This has got to count for something, whatever my old lady governess may say to my mother about excessive and theatrical devotion. I have saints’ knees. I have scuffed the skin of my knees by continual prayer; these are my stigmata: saints’ knees. Pray God I can meet their challenge and have a saint’s end too.’

-10 year old Margaret Beaufort, “The Red Queen,” by Philippa Gregory 


On 22 August 1485, Lady Margaret Beaufort’s only son, Henry Tudor, defeated King Richard III and his Yorkist army at the Battle of Bosworth Field thus ending the Wars of the Roses and becoming King Henry VII of England. It is widely believed that Margaret’s relentless belief in him and promotion of his interests largely influenced Henry’s success.