my sister marilyn

     Most people thought that Marilyn was playing herself in roles like she had in Show Business, Monkey Business, or Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Viewers based this opinion upon the seeming lack of skill that her roles required and upon the similarity between these characters and the public image she projected during the first half of her career.
     However, most of the roles that were given to Marilyn were the opposite of her personality. Marilyn was not a dumb blond. She was thoughtful and determined and a workaholic. She insisted on perfection from herself in her scenes. On the set, Marilyn was her own slave driver. Off the set, over her lifetime, she allowed herself very few vacations. She appeared where she had to appear at the request of the studio, but she was not a social butterfly and stayed too busy to do much dating. Although she left high school after the eleventh grade, and although there were gaps in her general knowledge, she had a good academic record and throughout her life was a voracious reader. Marilyn’s constant reading only seemed to earn her criticism and ridicule. The real Marilyn thought to be the phony one.
-My Sister Marilyn by Berniece Baker Miracle. 

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“…There was no missing her! She stood out immediately from all the rest of the passengers, so tall and pretty and fresh. We were excited to finally meet, and we couldn’t stop staring at each other. We had the same dark blond hair with a widow’s peak, the same mouth, but our eyes were different- mine are brown and Norma Jeane’s were blue like our mother’s. I was so happy to have a sister. And so proud.” - Berniece Miracle.

I remember waiting at the train station in Detroit for Marilyn to appear that first time - of course, then she was still Norma Jeane. We had been writing to each other over the years and had exchanged pictures, but we had never met face to face. She’d told me she’d be wearing a cobalt blue suit and a hat with a heart-shaped brim, but I worried that I wouldn’t reconigze her when she stepped off the train.

There was no missing her! She stood out immediately from all the rest of the passengers, so tall and pretty and fresh. We were excited to finally meet, and we couldn’t stop staring at each other. We had the same dark blond hair with a widow’s peak, the same mouth, but our eyes were different - mine are brown and Norma Jeanes’s were blue like our mother’s.
I was so happy to have a sister. And so proud.

But when I was growing up I didn’t even know if my mother was still alive. And I didn’t find out about Norma Jeane until she was twelve and I was nineteen. - Bernice Mircale (Half sister of Marilyn Monroe)



Thank you very much, but you should thank http://lovenormajeane.tumblr.com for the Mexico gifs since they are the ones that made it. And yep that’s the dress she was buried in, it’s been described as seafoam green, apple green and just plain green. Most of the photos of her in it are black and white so it’s a bit hard to tell. 

From ‘My Sister Marilyn’ by Berniece Baker Miracle and Mona Rae Miracle:

“She [Berniece] and Inez are here to choose something for Marilyn to wear in her coffin.
There are two closets to search through, one in Marilyn’s bedroom and another in the guest bedroom.
Berniece’s instinct tells her that colour, rather than white, will create the mood that Marilyn would have wished. She chooses an apple green sheath dress of nylon jersey. Berniece and Inez confer about Marilyn’s weight loss and the possible difficulties that may result from a clingy soft dress on a body in repose. They don’t know what might be avaible at the funeral home, so they rummage about, gathering much more than they need- half a dozen safety pins, a sheet, and several garments of various size and thickness-to be used in making the dress conform to Marilyn’s normal body shape.”

The next time I read that people believe that The Secret Life of Marilyn Monroe is accurate I will scream.

Read these books and then come back to me and tell me it’s accurate:


Marilyn Monroe The Biography by Donald Spoto

My Sister Marilyn by Bernice and Mona Rae Miracle

MM: Private and Undisclosed by Michelle Morgan

The Marilyn Encyclopedia by Adam Victor (looks at a lot of different viewpoints of each topic)

My Story (ghost written by Ben Hecht, released after her death)

Fragments

Marilyn; Her Life In Her Own Words by George Barris


Read this and you will see that there are so many flaws in its accuracy it may as well have been about someone else.

And Marilyn said in 1962 “Lies! Lies! Lies!”