my show history

10

Gay Desire in Film: A Valentine’s Day Celebration

4

“Betty and I have been next-door neighbors since we were four. We’ve always gone to the same school, been in the same class.

I remember in the 2nd grade, I was having trouble reading and my teacher Mrs. Gribrock told my mom and dad that I should stay back a year to get caught up. Betty was so against us not being in the same grade that she took it upon herself to tutor me every single day.”

I noticed that not only do an Altean’s markings glow when they feel sad, but their eye color changes. I mean, in this scene where Allura was about to kill destroy the Ai of her dad, her markings were literally glowing and her eyes turned blue

I’m not sure what exactly triggers the glowy markings and changing eye color (maybe it can even change color??) but I think it’s strong emotion towards something or someone. So does this mean we’ll get to see more canonically glowing Alteans in the next season? Bc if so, sign me the fuck up

high school teachers act like college professors are gonna be all serious and tough but one time my history professor showed up to class 10 minutes late on a rainy day looking 500% done and he just stopped in the middle of the room and sighed really loudly and was like
“guys, you know, I had to stop by my car on the way here to get something and I realized….I realized I could literally just get in my car and drive away. I could drive all the way home and sit on my couch and drink a beer. But I came here for you guys. FOR YOU. I love you guys, and when I go home I’m drinking a beer then taking a nap, and then maybe I’ll grade your papers”
and another time in the same class the classroom technology wasn’t working (it rarely ever did) and he was like “well, looks like I’m just going to have to go outside and set this ipad on fire and while I’m at it might as well set myself on fire too”
And one time we spent a whole class talking about those creepy clowns in the news and he somehow managed to connect it to the societal hierarchy of colonial america

“My mom and I in the California desert. (2004)”   

*For the record, this was during Dan’s Hues days.  

I wan’t to show you guys what we have on the books. I don’t want to ruin the experience when you’re watching it but look at the books that Magnus has, he’s encyclopedia, he has “The Washing of The Spears” by Donald R. Morris and “A History of The Modern World” which yes he’s seen himself but it’s good to have um.. to see…it’s almost like a little diary in a way, “Handbook of Experimental Immunology” and um… so he’s got quite the collection of books and I think he’s read all of them.
—  Harry Shum Jr showing us Magnus’ books
6

Making History | 1.03

Leighton Meester as Deborah Revere

2

“Gon, You are light. Sometimes you shine so brightly, I must look away. But even so, is it still okay for me to stay by your side?

What It’s Really Like To Be Chronically Ill

Lauren Anne

Society’s recent obsession with cancer stories and movies like The Fault in Our Stars made me realize that the average person doesn’t know what it’s really like to be sick. Chronically sick. What it’s like to wake up every morning and know you’re never going to get better. No amount of medicine, doctors, surgeries, and procedures can fix you.

I think the reason why people today love to hear about cancer stories is because they are just that. They are stories. They have a beginning, middle, and an end. While that end may not be a happy one, people are satisfied with closure. But my story doesn’t have an end. And people don’t seem to like stories without an ending.

Being sick isn’t as glamorous as they make it out to be in the movies. And unlike cancer perks, there are no “chronic illness perks.” Except maybe those really good lollipops at the doctor’s office. Those are definitely a perk.

The worst part about being chronically sick isn’t the physical pain, it’s the emotional pain that goes along with it. You reach a point where you can’t hold back the tears any longer and suddenly you’re breaking down in the middle of a doctor’s office. You think you can escape the emotional torture; your disease is purely physical, right?

The worst part is that there is no escape. There is no light at the end of the tunnel. There is no happy ending. There is no way to make the incurable go away. We learn to tolerate the physical pain. You have to. But it’s the overwhelming emotional burden that makes you feel like someone is holding your head down in the water. You can fight it, but you can never overcome that crushing feeling. How are you supposed to get rid of an emotional suffocation when the source of it is never going to go away?

Being sick is being stuck in the eternal clutch of the unknown. Any day anything could go wrong, or at least more wrong than it already has. It’s so hard not to feel anxious or depressed or completely lost when all that lies ahead is a giant question mark. You rarely seem to get answers when you are sick. And when you do, they’re often the answers you wish you hadn’t heard any way.

There’s one thing every single sick person wishes for, but rarely gets. Hope. Hope that one day things will get better. Hope that there will finally be a day when your pain is a zero on that silly little scale. Hope that one day you’ll get a glimpse of normal.

I know technically being sick means my genes suck or my body just plain hates me, but somehow being sick has made me better. I may be biased, but I think that sick people — especially young sick people — are some of the best people you will ever meet. Now don’t get me wrong, healthy people are great too. But when you’re sick, you understand things that other people might take for granted.

You learn to love every good second, every good minute, of any of those few good days you might have. You don’t fear death because you’ve already stared it straight in the face quite a few times. You know it’s not important to dwell on the little things. You have more important things to worry about.

So as many times as I’ve wished to be normal for even just a day, I’ve appreciated my life, both the good and the bad, so much more as a chronically ill young person that I ever could have as a regular teenager.

Being sick makes you strong. Being sick makes you weak. Being sick gives you insight and knowledge about life as it eats away at your own. Being sick is the greatest blessing in disguise. It is so much more than just having an illness. It’s having your entire life be taken out of your control, and fighting to get it back. And that fight will never end.

—  “what it’s really like to be chronically ill” by Lauren Anne

anonymous asked:

I see that you use "prince of hell" warlock in a lot of your tags, what does that mean?

oh my god this is kind of embarrassing because my feelings about this are so intense. like i’m not even sure i can fully articulate what it’s genuinely about but i will try. also book spoilers.

Warlocks always have a demon for a father and Magnus’s father in particular was revealed to be Asmodeus, one of the seven princes of hell and a fallen angel. It’s the reason he’s so powerful and since Asmodeus erased someone’s entire life as if it were nothing, it’s likely why Magnus has a particular talent for memory spells. We also see Magnus activate a witchlight at one point, which normally only responds to Shadowhunter (angel) blood.

And yet it was used more for relationship drama than anything, even though Magnus going through the centuries believing that he has the purest form of demon blood is a huge deal for his character. He’s clearly ashamed of it. Plus, what does having something so similar to angel blood mean for him? We’re told time and again that he’s powerful, that he has all this rich heartbreaking history, but we only get glimpses of it at best. What happened after he killed his human father after nearly being drowned? I mean, he was six or something and literally the first time he used his magic was to burn a man alive. How did he end up in Spain all the way from Indonesia? Did someone bring him to the Spiral Labyrinth? Magnus says Silent Brothers took him in, but that only appears in deleted pages of CoA; in CoB he simply calls them “churchmen.” How did he discover Asmodeus was his father? What was their conversation the first time he summoned him? What is even Magnus’s birth name before he took this one? A name, by the way, that unlike other warlocks speaks not of mourning or solitude (Loss, Fell, Fade, Gray) but of pure destruction, which says everything about what Magnus thinks of himself and his origins.

In short, the entire concept of him being the son of a Prince of Hell represents everything I wanted and nothing I ever got. That tag is purely about my extreme thirst for Magnus being Magnus. Not the guy who’s one half of a ship, not a glittery warlock with a great fashion sense, but Magnus Fucking Bane, the man who understands exactly who he is and what he’s capable of, who loves with all of his heart and would prefer to tell stupid stories about how he was totes BFFs with Julius Caesar but who will not hesitate to fuck your shit up if you mess with his people and when he’s done, his eyeliner will not have a single smudge. It is for Magnus lounging at his nightclub like a king. It is for Magnus carving his history and tainted birthright into his own name, but still clinging to the belief that he’s human and a good man.