my screenplays

2

Sabrina (1954) dir. Billy Wilder

Your mind has not been on the cooking. Your mind has been elsewhere. You’re in love. And I will venture to go a step further — you’re unhappily in love. Does it show? Very clearly.

i can’t believe we have all these les mis adaptations but not one of them is a sitcom,,,,,like,,

  • javert living in an apartment and just trying to do his job as an Important Police Officer
  • the les amis de l’abc live in the studio apartment directly above him and javert Knows they’re all up to something
  • but he can’t find a damn THING to prove anything unlawful is happening or he can’t arrest them because of a technicality every time he goes up there to check
  • and someone new opens the door every time???? how many people live up there???? no one knows
  • then in the apartment directly next to javert’s is valjean and cosette
  • and valjean is on the run from the police and javert for something he didn’t do so he’s wearing disguises all the time because he didn’t realise javert lived there when they moved in???? but they like the apartment too much to move
  • and cosette is just trying to date the cute freckly boy from upstairs but she keeps having to wear disguises too and he doesn’t realise it’s her half the time
  • and all of his friends keep getting in the way
  • it’s a heartwarming show about people trying to exist together in harmony but miscommunication, mistaken identities, and accidental meddling in other’s lives keeps getting in the way
  • hilarity ensues 
The Marauders S1 E1 - I Solemnly Swear That I Am Up To No Good (act i part i)

In which the boys return to school to start their 5th year at Hogwarts. Remus questions his credibility as a prefect. James and Sirius try out for the Gryffindor quidditch team.

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8

The man in the chair is MARWOOD. Twenty-five years old. Milk white with insomnia. Glasses like Lennon’s and a sweet face behind them. Seventy-five per cent good looks and the rest is anxiety. This is a long haul with unspecified destination. Only thing certain is there are still hours to go. Hours and hours have stagnated in here. Drifting in cigarette smoke and settling with the dust.

Okay but seriously, imagine this:

a Hollywood movie based on Evgeni Malkin’s escape to America

6

Calling all psychopaths! Are you mental or deranged? Maybe you’ve recently been hospitalized, but are now okay. Or maybe the world just doesn’t understand you. Yeah, right! Well, I’m writing a screenplay with my friend called the Seven Psychopaths, and if your story is crazy or quirky enough, we might use it for our movie. So please call Billy Bickle at 310-555-01… -Seven Psychopaths (2012)

4

And to your favourite song
We sang along to the start of forever

[insp]

Anyone else ever think about Bumi. 

And how when Aang disapeared, and Gyatso went looking for him, he probably went to Bumi. And Bumi had to suffer through Aang’s concerned parent, watch Gyatso search for Aang, help him, watch Gyatso slowly give up and return to the temples, to fade away, or, maybe even worse, to never give up and never see Aang again. 

That Bumi was there at the time of peace, and must have woken up one day to chaos. To people in the streets talked, frightened, about the attack on the Air Nation. How many other friends Bumi might have lost, assuming Aang wasn’t the only Air Nomad he knew?

fucking--gorgeous  asked:

Could you give some tips on chapter pacing? Specifically, I'm wondering if it's too confusing to have chapters pick up immediately or very shortly after the last left off. (I'm writing YA and really doubt anybody wants 12k word chapters, but of course I don't want my readers to get lost.)

There’s a few different ways to handle pacing. Personally, I’ve put my own twist on the scene/sequel method. Google “scene sequel”, read through a bunch of those results, and see what speaks to you.

Since I struggle with pacing, I came up with my own hack because 

  1. I don’t write in order, and, 
  2. I hate writing formal outlines.

It’s a combo of scene/sequel and good old plot diagram because overstuffed chapters are a symptom of an overstuffed plot for me. I’m going to use my screenplay as an example because it’s what I’m working on, but this also works for novels and short stories.

First, think about how many pages or words you want your piece to have. It’s a little different for every genre, so use what’s appropriate for your story. In my case, I wanted my script to be 94 pages, so I made three folders for the beginning, middle and end, and included a target page count.

Yes, those numbers add up to 101 pages, but Scrivener adds a lot of white space it removed when it compiles screenplays so I accounted for that.

Next, I knew my inciting event should happen within the first 5 pages and the midpoint would have to be around page 47, and so I put little flags in to represent them.

If you’re writing a story, you might want to break down that first chapter a bit more so you can know you need to hit the inciting event by say, page 4.

With those guidelines in place, I write. When I want to check my progress, I select the pages and look at the page count in the bottom, using the flags as the measuring stick.

If you don’t use Scrivener, you can do something similar in your word processor of choice. Make a bit of text like ===END STARTS HERE Page 120=== or ===MIDPOINT STARTS HERE 75=== OR using headings/styles if you’re comfortable with those. Whatever you choose, be consistent! When you want to check where you are, “find” (command or control F depending if you’re on Mac or PC) the ===, and it’ll take you to that page.

Page count would likely be easier if you’re using this as a guide for your rough draft, but word count may be easier if you’re using this to generate your revised draft.

Don’t be afraid to experiment and see what works for you.

- Graphei

Privacy; Interrupted

Summary: Request from Anon -The boys get bored and insisted on joining you while you grocery shop. [and it turned into whatever this is, sorry.]**

Characters: Steve Rogers, Bucky Barnes

Word Count: 1300+

Warnings: Language, implied smut, terrible writing, PWP, Ash having a computer, smut,  idfk reader beware.

A/N: This is a rewrite from a SPN fic I wrote from an anon request. The bolded italics are the reader’s thoughts. I wasn’t going to tell you that but I figured I save myself the time of answering asks about it.

Originally posted by skylerlockerbie


Day 11 without a hint of action and the boys are officially driving me nuts. With the Accords in place, Bucky in recovery, and Tony Stark nowhere to be found, life was pretty dull around your safe house.

I, on the other hand, have buried myself  into my writing. Finally putting some much needed thought into my  novel, adding bit and pieces to my screenplay, and dabbling in some prose that was a little ‘less dignified’. I spend way more time thinking of synonyms of penis, than I’d like to admit.

The guys weren’t prepared for the sudden onslaught of nothingness and since I’d taken up permanent residence with them, I was now their sole form of entertainment.

Keep reading

nytimes.com
The Woman Behind ‘Wonder Woman’
For the director Patty Jenkins, a world in crisis demands a heroine who is sincere.
By Cara Buckley

By CARA BUCKLEY. JUNE 1, 2017.

Patty Jenkins knew expectations would be stratospheric for “Wonder Woman,” starring Gal Gadot, a former Miss Israel who served as a combat trainer in the Israeli Army. The film (in theaters Friday, June 2) is the summer’s most anticipated release and also the first time the halter-top-and-hot-pants-wearing superhero, who was introduced in 1941, has had a movie all her own. But Ms. Jenkins, whose only previous feature, “Monster,” won Charlize Theron an Oscar in 2004, said she felt pressure most intensely from herself.

“I have a high bar for myself already; I always want to do something beautiful and meaningful,” Ms. Jenkins said by phone from her Los Angeles home. “I was aware that I was the first person of all time getting to direct a Wonder Woman film, and that was taken very seriously.”

She wasn’t the first choice: Michelle MacLaren left, with Warner Bros. citing “creative differences”; and Ms. Jenkins said she and Ms. MacLaren ran into each other as the switch was happening, and hugged. “We’re cool,” Ms. Jenkins said.

Her vision of “Wonder Woman” — someone strong, loving and vulnerable, who exudes sincerity, which Ms. Jenkins says is sorely lacking in films — has most critics in a swoon. Here are edited excerpts from the conversation.

I wish this movie had been around when I was a little kid.

I just got a little teary hearing that, because it hits me every once in a while, when I go to mommy-daughter events. I knew it was going to be PG-13, and there’s so much there for adults, but also that little girls were going to want to see it, so I tried to make it as safe as possible. If we succeeded in bringing something to people while they’re growing up, that would be something.

How does the director and writer of a film Roger Ebert deemed the third best of the decade not immediately get hired to make another feature?

There was a movie I was trying to make right after “Monster,” a bigger behemoth, the Chuck Yeager story. It was a life dream, but it just didn’t line up. We just had issues with the life rights ultimately. Also, I got pregnant, and making a feature is not compatible with the first years of a child’s life. Then the bottom fell out of the indie film world, and nobody was interested in what I brought, but instead in what I could do for them. I had my own scripts, but people didn’t want to read them. They only wanted to do tent poles. So I began doing pilots.

Do you think gender hurt you in terms of trying to make feature films?

I don’t know. Ironically, tent poles were what I was asked to do, though they weren’t ones I was into. I think [being a woman] might have had something to do with why people were not interested in my screenplays. It was, “Ah, we don’t want that point of view, we want our point of view.” If you want more diversity in the industry, you need diverse people writing scripts and developing them.

When you started the project, was the casting nailed down?

The only casting in place was Gal. I’m so picky about casting, and when I heard that they’d cast Wonder Woman, my heart sank. But oh my God, it was one of the luckiest things that ever happened to me, because Gal Gadot is so magical and wonderful. They found the best person in the universe.

Do you think “Wonder Woman” needed a woman to direct it?

I don’t think any movie has to have any specific kind of person. I wasn’t directing a woman, I was just directing a hero, and that freed me up to go broader with her personality than someone might be able to do if they were afraid to make her vulnerable and loving and warm, and not always right, which is absolutely imperative to a leading character. That’s been one of the hardest things about leading characters: Other people might not have felt safe, or worried [that] if there’s any vulnerability, what that’s saying? But main characters have to have flaws, and have a journey and be rich. I felt the same way about “Monster.” A woman didn’t have to direct it, and I wasn’t directing a woman’s story. I was directing a person.

Did you get studio pushback on making Wonder Woman vulnerable?

There were a lot of conversations, definitely, and it was a constant surprise to some people that I was doing it. But you look back at the history of characters, and oftentimes any notion that the lead person doesn’t get to be anything but impeccably right, that becomes D.O.A. That’s been a problem with some of the female characters they’ve tried to put forth. They’re too hard or too strong. I think “Hunger Games” was one of the great things changing that. She’s just a girl.

“Monster” was an indie, and this was a huge movie in terms of its production budget. Was that ever daunting?

Surprisingly, no. The TV projects I was doing were getting to $11 million or $12 million, shooting over an eight-to-10-day period, shutting down the Chicago River with helicopters and 1,000 people. In TV, you can end up working with a very high budget. Then, my vision was so clear for “Wonder Woman.” It’s the exact same math applied to more.

Will there be another Wonder Woman film?

Yeah, I sure hope so. It seems that way.

You’re doing it?

I’d love to, and that’s definitely a conversation, but nothing we are announcing yet.

This may be a cheesy question, but what do you want people to take away from this movie?

Did you say cheesy? Cheesy is one of the words banned in my world. I’m tired of sincerity being something we have to be afraid of doing. It’s been like that for 20 years, that the entertainment and art world has shied away from sincerity, real sincerity, because they feel they have to wink at the audience because that’s what the kids like. We have to do the real stories now. The world is in crisis.

I wanted to tell a story about a hero who believes in love, who is filled with love, who believes in change and the betterment of mankind. I believe in it. It’s terrible when it makes so many artists afraid to be sincere and truthful and emotional, and relegates them to the too-cool-for-school department. Art is supposed to bring beauty to the world.