my good sweet lord

10

Cedric greatly ponders the opposing ideas between his inner heart and mind; and expresses them into a solemn ballad. Many thoughts of his past and present emotional experiences are conjured up transiently around him. The happier and gentle memories of Sofia interrupt his more sinister ones. He then seemingly slumps into his chair in defeat, as he thinks more of her.

Although Wormwood is absolutely persistent in making Cedric evil, and reminds him that even though Sofia is nice to him… the others never were. Harking back to how the others have only ridiculed Cedric. Which then spurns the sorcerer into an anxiety attack, where he realizes he truly must take over the kingdom… once and for all

old people: you younguns are so sensitive!!! can’t take a joke!!! the “”real world”” won’t cater to your entitled needs sweetie :’’’’’)

same old people: *sees two girls holding hands* oh my sweet lord,,,,,goodness gracious we must protect our children,,,,,this is unnatural,,,,,

Caged (Ramsay x Reader)

Originally posted by rikkisixx

(Gif credit to owner)

Fandom: Game of Thrones

Character: Ramsay Bolton

Persona: Female

Word Count: 1,075

Request:  Would you write a Ramsay Bolton x Reader where the reader starts out as one of his ‘victims’ but eventually he ends up caring for her and decides to let her go. (Kinda like a caged bird, you know?)


You could feel his chest against your back, it was warm unlike the rest of him. His cold hands kept you secure in his grip as they rested against your waist. His face was nestled in your neck, the brown mass of hair was soft. You’d been awake for hours and there was no way you’d be able to sleep now; Lying with Ramsay Bolton gave you no pleasure, he terrified you. It was unusual for the Lord Bolton to keep a pet in his bed, although you thought this was one of many new ways of toying with his prey.

“Good morning little one”, his voice echoed through the room, it was sickly sweet.  “Good morning my lord”, you replied calmly, he didn’t normally wake this early. “I take it you haven’t slept again”, Ramsay said, pushing up against you. “I tried to my lord” you responded softly, scared of what he would say. “Mhm” he hummed in response, his grip tightened and he pressed his face further into your neck. As Ramsay lay next to you, his mind raced with thoughts.

Keep reading

My Sweet Lord (Early Take)
George Harrison
My Sweet Lord (Early Take)

“I thought a lot about whether to do ‘My Sweet Lord’ or not! because I would be committing myself publicly and I anticipated that a lot of people might get weird about it. Many people fear the words ‘Lord’ and ‘God’ - makes them angry for some strange reason.

The point was, I was sticking my neck on the chopping block because now I would have to live up to something, but at the same time I thought, ‘Nobody’s saying it; I wish somebody else was doing it.’ You know, everybody is going ‘Be-bop baby’ - OK it may be good to dance to, but I was naïve and thought we could express our feelings to each other - not suppress them and keep holding them back. Well, it was what I felt, and why should I be untrue to myself? I came to believe in the importance that if you feel something strong enough then you should say it.

I wasn’t consciously aware of the similarity between He’s So Fine and My Sweet Lord when I wrote the song as it was more improvised and not so fixed, although when my version of the song came out and started to get a lot of airplay people started talking about it and it was then I thought ‘Why didn’t I realise?’ It would have been very easy to change a note here or there, and not affect the feeling of the record.

I thought My Sweet Lord was a good ‘record.’ In the recording industry there are ‘songs’ and ‘records’ - anyway I thought the overall sound of the record was as important as the words or tune - the atmosphere really. I wanted to show that ‘Halleluja’ and ‘Hare Krishna’ are quite the same thing. I did the voices singing ‘Halleluja’ first and then the change to ‘Hare Krishna’ so that people would be chanting the Maha Mantra - before they knew what was going on! I had been chanting ‘Hare Krishna’ for a long time and this song was a simple idea of how to do a Western pop equivalent to a ‘Mantra’, which repeats over and over again, holy names.

I don’t feel guilty or bad about it, in fact it saved many a heroin addict’s life. I know the motive behind writing the song in the first place and its effect far exceeded the legal hassle." - George Harrison, I Me Mine

"See, in 1968 the big song was 'Oh Happy Day,’ and that was the song for me. It was so up and positive, and I thought it was great to be able to do something both spiritual and commercial. What’s the point of doing something no one’s going to hear? So I really wanted to come up with something like that, and incidentally the chord changes on 'My Sweet Lord’ are the same as on 'Oh Happy Day.’ Anyway, I was playing 'hallelujah’ over and over again on the guitar one day, and I put in 'hare krishna’ and it fit; both on syllables, rhythm, and in the meaning of the glorification of God. I thought it was a good way of getting 'hare krishna’ into the song. Then I did some scat singing to tie all the parts in together, and what had been a big chorus eventually got refined into a sequence for recording." - George Harrison, Hit Parader (May 1977)

Shakespeare Sunday

“If sack and sugar be a fault,
God help the wicked! if to be old and merry be a
sin, then many an old host that I know is damned: if
to be fat be to be hated, then Pharaoh’s lean kine
are to be loved. No, my good lord; banish Peto,
banish Bardolph, banish Poins: but sweet Jack
Falstaff, kind Jack Falstaff, true Jack Falstaff,
valiant Jack Falstaff, and therefore more valiant,
being, as he is, old Jack Falstaff, banish not him
thy Harry’s company, banish not him thy Harry’s
company: banish plump Jack, and banish all the world.”

- William Shakespeare, 1 Henry IV

Listen

My Sweet Lord’ from the triple album ‘All Things Must Pass’ (1970)

“I was inspired to write 'My Sweet Lord’ by the Edwin Hawkins Singers’ version of 'Oh Happy Day’ I thought a lot about whether to do 'My Sweet Lord’ or not because I would be committing myself publicly & I anticipated a lot of people might get weird about it. Many people fear the words 'Lord’ & 'God’ — makes them angry for some strange reason.

The point was, I was sticking my neck out on the chopping block because now I would have to live up to something, but at the same time I thought 'Nobody’s saying it, I wish somebody else was doing it’ You know everybody is going 'Be Bop Baby’ — OK it maybe good to dance to, but I was naive & thought we could express our feelings to each other—- not suppress them & keep holding them back, Well, it was what I felt, & why should I be untrue to myself? I came to believe in the importance that if you feel something strong enough then you should say it.

I wasn’t consciously aware of the similarity between ’He’s So Fine’ & ’My Sweet Lord’ when I wrote the song as it was more improvised & not so fixed, although when my version of the song came out & started to get a lot of airplay people started talking about it & it was then I thought 'why didn’t I realise?’ It would have been easy to change a note here or there, & not affect the feeling of the record.

I thought ’My Sweet Lord’ was a good 'record’ In the recording industry there are 'songs’ & 'records’ — anyway I thought the overall sound of the record was as important as the words or tune — the atmosphere really. I wanted to show that 'Hallelujah’ & 'Hare Krishna’ are quite the same thing. I did the voices singing 'Hallelujah’ & then the change to 'Hare Krishna’ so that people would be chanting the Maha Mantra — before they knew what was going on! I had been chanting 'Hare Krishna’ for a long time & this song was a simple idea of how to do a Western pop equivalent to a 'Mantra’ which repeats over & over again, holy names.

I don’t feel guilty or bad about it, in fact it saved many a heroin addict’s life. I know the motive behind writing the song in the first place & it’s effect far exceeded the legal hassle” - George Harrison, My Sweet Lord, 'I, Me Mine’ page 176

From Simon Leng’s book, While My Guitar Gently Weeps: The Music of George Harrison, I feel this can be said about 'My Sweet Lord’, 'Harrison had never made so clear a musical statement that his signature bottleneck sound was as much his tool for self-expression as his vocal chords.’ Simon Leng, While My Guitar Gently Weeps: The Music of George Harrison page 285

theguardian.com
Nina Simone: 'Are you ready to burn buildings?'
By Dorian Lynskey

One of Simone’s most powerful concerts, captured on the ’Nuff Said! album, took place at Westbury Music Fair on 7 April 1968, three days after Dr King was shot dead. She grieved on a brand-new song called Why? (The King of Love Is Dead), then raged on a white-knuckle version of Mississippi Goddam. “The king of love is dead,” she said. “I ain’t ‘bout to be nonviolent, honey!”

Simone was now less a musician who cared about politics than an activist who sang. Her music was by, about and for black people. She would scan the crowd for black faces and tell them, “I’m singing only to you. I don’t care about the others.” White fans, she said, were “accidental and incidental”. She could not ignore the fact “that I was a black-skinned woman in a country where you could be killed because of that one fact.” No wonder there has been controversy over the casting of beautiful, light-skinned Zoe Saldana in the long-delayed biopic Nina.

Although she was outwardly still engaged, Simone claimed she lost faith in activism in 1970, when the movement fractured and the revolution didn’t come. “Optimists talked about the advances we had made, but all I saw were lost opportunities,” she wrote. Some of that energy was redirected into a new kind of music. Simone lived on stage and didn’t care much for albums. Leftover songs from the 1971 RCA sessions that produced the Here Comes the Sun album were later cut-and-shut with live recordings, often overdubbed with applause to conceal the joins. No longer writing, she expressed a potent personal vision entirely through diverse cover versions. There is nothing to connect the slow-burning soul of Steppenwolf’s The Pusher, the polyrythmic frenzy of Ike and Tina Turner’s Funkier Than a Mosquito Tweeter and the desolate, barely-there jazz-folk of Fairport Convention’s Who Knows Where the Time Goes? except Simone’s formidable conviction.

During an antiwar show at Fort Dix, New Jersey in November 1971, she fused George Harrison’s My Sweet Lord and David Nelson’s poem Today Is a Killer into a jawdropping gospel rollercoaster that concluded with a blasphemous cry of: “Who are you, Lord? You are a killer!” Included on Emergency Ward! (1972), My Sweet Lord made good on her promise “to shake people up so bad that when they leave a nightclub where I performed I just want them to be in pieces.” Sick of America, on the ominously titled It Is Finished (1974) she explored African percussion, sitars and the strange, chilling visions of the maverick Bahamian musician Exuma.

These albums sold poorly and didn’t even rate a mention in her memoir, but they leave you salivating at the thought of what she might have done next had she not abandoned activism, the music industry (“the dirtiest and most immoral business in the world”) and the “United Snakes of America” to spend two years in exile in Liberia.

When Simone returned to the stage, all the solidarity and hope of the movement had been burned away, leaving only rage and resentment that was intensified by her illness. Garbus’s film shows her hostile, imperious comeback show at the 1976 Montreux Jazz festival but not the time she told an audience at the music industry conference Midem, “You are all crooks!”, nor the calamity in Pamplona where she told the crowd: “I don’t sing for bastards. I don’t like white people.” She didn’t just rock the boat; she tried to sink it. [Read More]

durgeth  asked:

What happens when Simic and Izzet collaborate on a project?

Simic: While Izzet and I get along very well, and we do tend bounce ideas off each other, we seldom end up directly working on a project together. We’ve got different styles of working, you see. My projects are… organic. They flow from one idea to the next, and the end product will always have traces of the starting idea, no matter how far along you get. Meanwhile, Izzet’s projects are a bit more… eccentric. Their ideas come like bolts of inspiration out of the blue, and they’ll often drop the original idea if they get “bored” with it.

Izzet: alright imma level with you for a sec. sim and me? we’re tight as hell. but oh my good sweet lord if they don’t take their sweet-ass time on every little planning detail i am about to lose my MIND just thinkin bout it. i gotta get pen to paper paper to workbench and workbench to prototype in like a DAY or else i lose the train and it just goes right off the track like pchooo, see ya later or maybe not, i don’t know, you ain’t on the rails anymore. so yeah.

Simic: That being said, when we do mesh on a project, the results tend to be…

Izzet: ART~.

Simic: Exactly.

Izzet: we turned my jeep into a transformer

Simic: I drew up the plans.

Izzet: i made my baby fly