my favorite part of this game

smolcheld  asked:

I have a love-hate relationship with Budo. I like him in the game and when he's not being screwed up by the fandom. This fandom honestly ruined him for me, talking about how he's the best character ever, he should be Ayano's senpai, portraying him as an obsessive pervert, etc, etc. (My favorite portrayal of him though is when he's a lovable idiot)

I kinda share the same opinion, even if I don’t really like him in the game (more for the “JOIN MY CLUB” part of his personality). But some rant about him and about how much of a perfect character he is make him unpleasant. But still. He can be an interesting character, and I think he has a lot of potential, but some fanon vers of him aren’t good at all;;;; 

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   Favorite video game soundtracks.「 part one 」

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!!!!!15 MILLION SUBSCRIBERS!!!!!

!Trash Mammals Unite!

@therealjacksepticeye This is amazing!!!! Congratulations on this great achievement! I feel so blessed to be a part of this community. It is so nice and full of such wonderful, genuine, creative and determined people. And with such a wonderful example as Sean I’m not surprised. Thank you for everything and here is to continued growth and most of all happiness and inspiration!

By the way here LOL this is a little animation and pic I drew to celebrate 15 Million. Totally LOVE animating in this art style! Night in the Woods is one of my favorite series of yours (along with almost every other story-based game you play) and watching you play all these wonderful games continues to inspire me to try and make a game of my own someday. Who knows…

How People Watching Improves Your Writing

Sensory detail. 

When I was fourteen or fifteen, I liked to draw. I’d look up internet tutorials on how to draw the human figure, and nearly all of them suggested going outside and sketching anyone who goes by. Not only was this relaxing, but I noticed my art style become more realistic over time. I think we can apply similar concepts as writers to improve sensory description. 

How to practice: Try writing down specific details about the people you see. How is their walking gait? What does their voice sound like? What quirks about them stand out as you observe them? Write down descriptions using all of the senses (except maybe taste) and, over time, you’ll notice your words become more lively.

Observation.

You don’t have to be Sherlock Holmes to benefit from observation skills. Writing stories is all about noticing connections and seeing the extraordinary in ordinary life. People watching can boost your ability to notice little details and recognize them as important, and it can help you sense patterns more easily.

How to practice: In this case, remember once again that you are not Sherlock Holmes. Don’t assume that you know a person’s life story based on what socks they’re wearing (and definitely don’t try making such assumptions with friends or family). 

Try to take in people who pass by and the small, unique details about them. Notice how they’re interacting with other people and the world around them. Think about why that might be and write down any thoughts or connections that interest you.

Freewriting. 

Writing first drafts can paralyze anyone. We all know that getting the words out is the first, most important step, but that can feel like torture sometimes. If you’re a hesitant writer, freewriting can help you feel less self-conscious when writing and jot down thoughts or impressions as they come. Other exercises can help you with editing later on, but you can’t get there unless you freewrite.

How to practice: Write down anything that strikes you without worrying whether it’s important or you’ll use it later. I like to focus on one person per minute and during that time, write anything that I find interesting. Once the sixty seconds are up, I move onto another person and continue that cycle as long as I want to keep going. With time, you’ll get faster and may notice that words come more easily.

Creativity. 

In the book Stargirl, one of my favorite parts is when Stargirl and Leo go to the park and play a game where they make up stories about the strangers they pass. As they connect together little observations, they create vivid backstories that may not necessarily be true, but that’s not the point. What matters is stretching their minds.

How to practice: Play this game for yourself. Pick a person at random and, piecing together little details you notice about them, give them a backstory. What are they doing, and where are they going (both right now and in the long-term)? Why are they hurrying so quickly to wherever they’re going or walking almost aimlessly along? Don’t worry about getting it “right” so much as creating an interesting story for this person.

Empathy. 

Developing empathy as a writer is so important, though not often talked about. If you can put yourself in the shoes of another person and consider what complexities, challenges, and little joys life holds for them, you will create emotionally powerful pieces. People watching helps train your eye to notice those around you more and remember that yours is not the only voice in the world.

How to practice: Remember the definition of the word “sonder:” the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own. Look for those complexities. Notice relationships. Notice facial expressions and emotions. Don’t just look at them but see them, and write down what strikes you about them.

My favorite part of FE7 is when Eliwood and the squad need lay low to get some info at a town, so they need disguises. No, my favorite part is not the fact that said disguises are simply capes worn over their clothes that do nothing to conceal their faces, that’s my second favorite part, my top favorite part is that, before this mission, there’s an optional character one can recruit, the thief Legault. He is so easy to recruit that the game doesn’t doubt for one second that the player will, because during this cutscene, it is Legault that provides the “disguises” to the Eliwood and company, appearing for one line of dialogue and saying “this should be ok”, to which Eliwood says “Thanks, Legault”.

What I am trying to say is that if you didn’t recruit Legault, he sort of still just appears out of the aether, provides you disguises and info on how to traverse the town, Eliwood says “Thanks, Legault” to this complete and utter stranger that the player might not even know of, and then he vanishes once anew.

This also happens if you kill Legault.

Legault is my favorite cryptid.

The A-mew-sing Sequel To Adrien’s Game

This time, there are only four episodes covered but a lot of pictures so I’m adding a “read more”…eventually.  Also, Ladybug is on Netflix!  Go watch.  Here we go with the next four eps!

The last time we left our boy Adrien, he was developing his flirting technique with the lovely Marinette.  Or not.  It’s fun to speculate though, right?  Right?!

…ANYway, let’s see how he tops the almost kiss.

 In “Darkblade” (Le Chevalier Noir):

  • Marinette decides to run against Chloe for class something-or-other
  • To the utter delight of 95% of the class
  • That’s right man, just play it cool…
  • CASUAL FINGER GUNS and AMBIGUOUS SUPPORT!!!


In “The Mime” (Le Mime):

  • Hey, I didn’t know y’all were gonna be here too lol!
  • Smooth move, dude.  Just play it off like you had NO IDEA.

Our cat son heats things up below the cut!

Keep reading

Yknow, the thing about Mass Effect, for all its flaws and problematic moments and issues that bioware really needs to work on, they got one thing down. Emotion. I’ve never played a game so packed with emotion as Mass Effect is. Yeah we all bitch about the ending of Mass Effect 3, we all point out the sexist moments, we all discuss where Bioware needs to grow. But I think a majority of us will remember the shocking moment of seeing the Collector base for the first time. We find friends in this rag-tag band our Shepard brings together. We’ll all hold our breath as Joker hobbles through a Normandy under attack. We agonize over who we left behind on Virmire. We cried when characters we came to know left us, and we cheered when a cure for all Krogan fell upon Tuchanka. We were sad, happy, angry, desperate, hopeful, and passionate right alongside these characters we came to know so well. And don’t tell me a huge-ass grin didn’t appear on your face when that damn Thresher Maw took out that Reaper. You can point out as many flaws as you want with the games, we all talk about it; but in the end, Mass Effect isn’t just a game. It’s a feeling, an emotion, an energy that I have personally never felt in any other video game ever. It is passion, plain and simple. And I just find that to be so damn important, when something can make you feel as if a part of your own soul is right there along for the ride. 

Idk that’s just so beautiful to me and it’s why Mass Effect will always be my favorite series of games regardless of the flaws it possesses. 

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— Like God, you mean? That might be pleasurable in its own way, but unfortunately I’m not into being an umpire or a referee, as I can’t genuinely enjoy the game unless I’m part of it. And I love this game that people call “life” from the bottom of my heart. That’s why I’d like to continue to participate in it as a player, forever and ever.
10 requests. #08 - Psycho Pass + Favorite Episode asked by @theshipthatneversetsail