my books weigh a ton

5

House of Leaves is odd (even frustrating, at times). But the story is compelling and pulls you in. Unreliable narrator, humour at unexpected places, mystery, loose ends, with just the right amount of spooky.. It’s an autumn read through and through. 

Eight Years Later

Oops. My hand slipped. Couldn’t resist this bit of inspiration.


EIGHTEEN

My backpack lands on the wide counter with a loud thud that I feel in my shoulders. Stupid AP Biology text book weighs a ton. As I roll my shoulders to work out the kinks, Peeta walks into the back room and smiles.

“Just give me a minute to finish prepping tomorrow’s dough and we’ll get out of here,” he tells me.

I hop up on the counter and pull out a text book while he washes his hands and gets to work. I don’t mind waiting while he finishes a shift. It’s actually nicer than being stuck at home. My house is usually empty and quiet now. As long as Peeta’s mom isn’t at the bakery, the place is warm and welcoming. Filled with rich scents and laughter as Peeta and his two brothers make light of their jobs.

My biology isn’t interesting to me right now, though. What is interesting to me is the way Peeta’s massaging that dough – er, kneading it. My aching shoulders throb in jealousy. The thing is, we’ve been dating for over a year but it wasn’t until last month that I worked up the nerve to admit to him that I wanted to have sex with him. I mean, who wouldn’t want to? He’s hot. But I’ve never been good with words and I’m even worse when it comes to sexy words.

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Still Beating (Part 6)

For previous parts click here. Thanks for reading. x

The lines in my textbook look like they’re blurring together. I’ve been on this page for the past ten minutes, but it feels like nothing has been sinking in. The heavy Introduction to Law textbook has been sprawled across my mattress the entire day and I’m only halfway through the chapter. I close the Word document on my computer and stick the highlighter on the page I’m on to keep my place when I close the book.

I walk to the side of my room and look out the window. That’s the best thing about my dorm. There’s windows that actually look out to something nice. I see the path leading to the main cafeteria at Columbus, which is decorated with trees on either side. The first week of October has come and gone and most of the leaves have already turned warm browns and oranges. It’s five o’clock on a Saturday, and there aren’t too many people in my view. A few couples walk along the cobblestones, hand in hand, bundled in jackets and hats. It’s fresh outside, and gone are the happy college students that throw Frisbees to each other and have picnics.

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