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The Ban

The recent travel ban by the president of United States have far reaching affect on the Muslim community living out side of the six banned nations. The Ban is a short documentary that sheds light on how Muslim individuals are affected by the travel ban living in Canada, specially in Vancouver.

Many have deemed this travel ban as xenophobic as it encourages discrimination against Muslims and promotes Islamophobia. The Ban, facilitated by Dr. Melek Ortabasi (SFU), interviews certain individuals who were affected by the ban. This video documentary gives them the platform for their stories to be heard. Furthermore, The Ban also includes prominent figures such as Vancouver based author and social activist Harsha Walia and Joy Kogawa, Canadian author and member of the Order of Canada. Joy has under went extreme racial discrimination during the Japanese internment in 1941.

The purpose of this video is to raise awareness and promote inclusivity of Muslim community in Canada. The take away message from this video is, as Joy Kogawa states near the end of video, “don’t let this happen again”, drawing a sharp comparison to the pitfalls of our modern history. This documentary calls for public attention to ban and helps demonstrate how such ruling negatively affects innocent Muslims living across the world.

We are not an interracial couple, and I’m sooo done with people using our pictures to combat racism within the Muslim community.

I haatteee with a passion when people caption our photos with stuff like:

“The believer looks at the piety of another, not their skin.”

“The beauty of their deen is more important than the beauty of their skin”

“Arab and African marriage 😍”

“MashaAllah her family is so open minded ❤️
❤️”

“When east meets west☺️”

what i hate most about liberal/intersectional feminism & trans activism

they are supportive of islam and see terfs as their biggest foes.

libfems, muslims would literally KILL women that walk half naked, they would KILL trans people, they would KILL homosexuals, if they had the chance. and they would love it. i’m from an islamic family and live in a muslim community, i would know. they think you’re a mess, they think you’re disgusting, and they hope you die soon.

yet you don’t call them out..? the people you call out are women on the internet that have and would never even hurt a fly (is that a saying in english as well? lol), that are just doing class based analysis to see what would be best for women and what would be harmful (since we’ve been oppressed for literal millennia you know..)

i don’t get it. i literally don’t get it. why would you. yes we deny transgenderism but we don’t want you to die! hell, some of us ARE trans or have detransitioned!!! some of us identified as genderfluid or non-binary or agender because we didn’t “feel” a “gender”!!!

i don’t get it!! why would you behave this way!! i see death and rape threats everywhere (and of course you deny it and say we do that as well, but without any proof), you call all of us white/call radical feminism “white supremacy” (without explaining why it would be) when your ideology is the whitest shit ever, you compare us to hitler (which is very anti-semitic), you call EVERYTHING transphobic, including fucking periods and FEMALE GENITAL MUTILATION, you call us unhygienic for not using lotion, you call us cunts, bitches, dykes, you take our identity (gay) from us and make it into an umbrella term??? what the fuck??

you’re a tiny as shit group but want society to adapt to your standards and stop calling periods “female”??????

you tell us we’ve killed 50,000 TRANS PEOPLE!! ARE THERE THAT MANY TRANS PEOPLE AROUND IN THE FIRST PLACE!!! and that just by literally just pointing out that trans women are MALE, which is a FACT, otherwise they wouldn’t have been TRANS IN THE FIRST PLACE!!!

i’m so confused, what the fuck is wrong with y'all

10

The Muslim community is mourning the passing of Nabra, a 17 year old young woman from Sterling, VA. Nabra was beaten to death with a baseball bat and left in a pond after going missing while walking to a mosque with her friends. Hate crime against Muslim Americans is at its highest point with more than 67% increase since 2016. Nabra is another example of the escalating violence towards Muslims Americans. Activists gathered at Union Square to hold a vigil for Nabra and her family and to stand against violence against Muslim Americans. 

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#BeingBlackandMuslim Portrait Series by Bobby Rogers

Visual artist and photographer Bobby Rogers’ latest portrait series #BeingBlackandMuslim taps on members of the Black Muslim community to share their harrowing experiences with, well, simply being who they are. 

The eyeopening series exposes stereotypes and stigmas plaguing the community; further proving we all have more work to do when it comes to bringing awareness to squash these century-old, derogatory ways of thinking. 

Instagram.com/WeTheUrban

Vocab

Commonly Used..
subhan'Allah - Glory be to God.

Astaghfirullah - Forgive me Allah.
Alhumdulillah - Praise be to God.

Masha'Allah - As God had willed.
Insha'Allah (i.A) - God Willing/ as God has willed.

Allahu-Akbar - God is the greatest.
La Illaha ill allah - There is no God but Allah.

Fi amaanillah - In Allah’s protection.
Allahu Alam - Allah knows best.

Aza wa jal - Mighty and majestic he is.
Barakallah Feek -  May Allah’s blessing be upon you (in general/ group)

Radiyallahu Anhu - used when the companion of the Prophet Muhammed is mentioned or used in writing. IT means - ‘May Allah be pleased with him’
[usually abbreviated as RA or RAA]
RadiAllahu anhaa- May Allah be pleased with her’ used after a female companion
[usually abbreviated as RA or RAA]

Some Quranic phrases that are recited often.
Innalilahi wa inna ilayhi rajioon - To Allah we belong and to Him we shall return

Bismillah ar rahman ar raheem - In the name of Allah the merciful, the compassionate.

Audhu Billahi min ash shaytaan ar rajeem - I seek protection in Allah from satan.

Words
Allah - God
Salam - peace
Hayaa - modesty
Taqwa - Fear Of Allah
Imaan - Faith
Dunya - world
Jannah - Paradise
Kaaba - Sacred mosque 🕋
Hadith - A collection of traditions containing sayings of the prophet Muhammad which, with accounts of his daily practice (the Sunna), constitute the major source of guidance for Muslims apart from the Quran.

Ill keep updating it if you wish! Thanks again for asking!
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Robert Doggart won’t face terrorism charges for plotting to burn down a NY mosque

  • Robert Doggart, 65, was arrested for plotting to attack and burn down a mosque, school and cafeteria in a predominant Muslim community in upstate New York in April 2015.
  • On Tuesday, less than one year since his arrest, the New York Daily News reported that Doggart won’t face terrorism charges for his plot. 
  • Doggart faces “one count of solicitation to commit arson, one count of solicitation to commit a civil rights violation and two counts of threat in interstate commerce.”
  • Why won’t he face terrorism charges? The United States does not have a federal statute on domestic terrorism. 
  • According to Rafia Zakaria, a human rights attorney, federal statutes on terrorism are — ironically — designed in language to deliberately criminalize foreign suspects.
  • The U.S. federal law statute on terrorism almost entirely targets individuals with foreign ties or alliances. Read more (2/14/17 3:27 PM)

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We’re gonna play a song that is about universal love and compassion… yeah, I’m sorry, I’m sorry to you.. I’m sorry if I ever said anything about religion or about anything that ever offended anybody. I don’t wanna offend anybody ever. My intention is to spread love and unity. So in particular, I wanna shoutout all of the communities that are misrepresented so: the muslim community, the black community, the LGBT community. I wanna say that we stand with you and we fucking love you and we love every single person in this field.
—  Matty Healy at Latitude Festival

Imagine being so far removed from reality that you think Hillary Clinton would have been a protector of oppressed communities in any significant, non-marginal way. The Hillary Clinton who voted for surveillance and monitoring of Muslim-American communities, who popularized the dehumanization of black youth and refused serious engagement with Black Lives Matter, who waited until it became optimal for her career to give even basic support for LGBTQ people. Fucking incredible

When someone has cancer or diabetes, we don’t say to them, “Just trust Allah”. So why do we say that to those with mental illnesses? Trusting Allah and having faith in His plans is imperative to the life of all Muslims - sick or not. However, Allah ﷻ specifically told us to trust Him and ‘tie your camel’. With mental illnesses, this means treatment is important.

Those with mental illnesses do not need to 'just trust Allah’, they need treatment. Let’s, as the Muslim community, make that more accessible.

A good friend of mine was diagnosed with liver cancer when we were in high school. She was 16. Some time later, upon hearing that a surgery had not gone as well as hoped, I sat down with my guitar and wrote her a song. A few other good friends of hers strung together some photographs to make a music video and we sent it to her to watch from her hospital bed. When those same friends gathered together less than two years later to sing the song at her funeral, the dissonance was jarring. This was meant to be a work song, to see her through the hard days when the task of healing was tiring. It was not supposed to be a funeral hymn.

In June of 2015, we as a band decided that our LGBTQ community deserved a new song for Pride Week. This was days after the Supreme Court ruled that state-level bans on same-sex marriages were in violation of the Constitution of the United States, and it felt like the whole country was celebrating.

But as we began to write, I couldn’t help but think that although we had won this particular battle, the hatred and fear ailing our nation seemed as malignant as ever.

I knew this because people were still dying.

At least 21 transgender women were murdered in 2015. A disproportionate percent of our country’s homeless youth were (and are) LGBTQ adolescents, forced to reckon with the impossible task of staying healthy and safe without a home or proper health care.

We knew that if we were to make a song that truly spoke to the American LGBTQ community in 2015, it would need to address both victory and violence.

With “I Know a Place,” we chose to imagine a place where none of us would need to be afraid. In honor of Pride and the rich LGBTQ history of turning bars and ballrooms into safe havens, the space we imagined was a dance club:

I can tell when you get nervous
You think being yourself means being unworthy
And it’s hard to love with a heart that’s hurting
But if you want to go out dancing
I know a place
I know a place we can go
Where everyone’s gonna lay down their weapons

At the time, we intended the dance club to serve as a metaphor. Then, on June 12th, 2016, a gunman walked into Latin Night at Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Florida — a queer space, a brown space, a safe space — and shot 49 people to death.

“I Know a Place” was never supposed to be a funeral hymn. It was meant to be a work song, like Yoko Ono’s full-page ad in the New York Times that proclaimed, “War Is Over!” in December of 1969, at the height of the Vietnam War. We wrote our song to be the voice in your head that tells you to celebrate peace during wartime, because our battle is only just beginning, and one day our war really will be over.

It was also meant to serve as encouragement for our community to remain vulnerable and kind and hopeful in the face of violence. We cannot build a better world without first imagining what that world might look like, and by creating that space inside ourselves first.

After the Pulse shooting, the Los Angeles Gay Men’s Chorus led a crowd of two thousand people outside City Hall in song:

We are a gentle, angry people
And we are singing
Singing for our lives

We sang with a unified voice that cried out, “We do not accept that this is what our world will look like.” And that night, people all over the country went out dancing — not just because it was Pride Weekend, but because they felt it important not to give in to fear in the face of hate.

People came together in dive bars, bedrooms, and places of worship to celebrate and to grieve, to love and protect one another, and this gentle resilience was nothing less than radical resistance.

Today, in this post-Trump America, many of us feel badly bruised. We, as a band, understand this. We believe it is a mistake to see this incoming Administration as anything other than a threat to the livelihood of our brothers and sisters; the LGBTQ+ community, the Muslim ummah, women, POC’s, indigenous Americans, undocumented people, the working class, and beyond. At the same time, we believe it is a mistake to say that a man whose best assets are hate and fear truly represents America. We say this because America has always been an idea, a utopian concept of a multiethnic, multicultural democratic republic, and therefore its home lies in the imagination, not in the House or the Senate or in a Trump Tower. In the bridge of the song, we implore:

They will try to make you unhappy; don’t let them
They will try to tell you you’re not free; don’t listen
I know a place where you don’t need protection
Even if it’s only in my imagination

Let us push ourselves to imagine a peaceful America where no one has to live in fear. Let us continue to build spaces with our humble means that reflect the America of which we dream. Let us keep up the fight.

Let us keep singing for our lives.

ー Katie Gavin, MUNA

anonymous asked:

What do you mean by "we're the bad guys?" I want to serve my country

I mean we’re the bad guys.  I mean if you join the military you are being exploited to make rich people richer.  If you want to serve your country volunteer for planned parent hood or a Muslim community center or a soup kitchen.  Be a disability advocate.  For veterans if you like.  As a member of the united states military, the only interests you serve are war profiteers.

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This organization is raising money so Muslim American filmmakers can tell their own stories

  • A community of Muslims and allies in San Francisco are raising funds to provide Muslim American filmmakers with grants to counter false narratives about their religious community.
  • The American Muslim Storytellers grant is in partnership with the Islamic Scholarship Fund, a nonprofit organization providing scholarships to Muslim American community members.
  • The crowdfunding campaign was launched on Saturday on Indiegogo, with a campaign goal of $10,000. 
  • The funds will provide Muslim American filmmakers grants between $1,000 and $4,000.
  • “We wanted to give people a way to directly support the American Muslim community,” Michael Morgenstern, founder of the grant, said in an email. “Anyone who believes that Muslims deserve a powerful voice today can give directly to people who want to tell their own stories.” Read more

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