muslim&proud

“It is girls like me who believe in education. It is girls like me who are Muslims and are proud of their religion who stand for education and believe in education. And we tell the world that all Muslims believe in education and believe in peace”.

Congratulations to Malala Yousafzai on her new role as United Nations Messenger of Peace! As youngest-ever Messenger of Peace, Malala will focus on girls’ education.

I’m half Moroccan, half Egyptian, and I was born in Amsterdam. I’m Muslim, and I’m super proud of my heritage and of my roots. I want to be a role model for young girls who are struggling with racism or struggling with their looks or with their skin color. I had Naomi Campbell, who I looked up to as a black powerful woman. But there aren’t many Arabic models, and being an African-Arabic model, I’m trying to open doors for more Arabic girls.
—  Imaan Hammam for Allure Magazine’s “41 Women of Color Get REAL About Beauty and Diversity”

Alternative title: Flagmageddon. 
I decided to go with Sami’s flag tights because I love the whole world-travelled aesthetic they gave him. 
Mistakes were made :’B 

So here’s a HEY GUESS WHAT to anyone who forgets he’s Syrian because he’s a Syrian supporting Syrian causes repping the Free Syria flag during his time in NXT.

Because he’s awesome like that.
And as a Muslim I’m 720% proud of what he stands for. 

Hijab Styles Across the Globe

What is a hijab? Chances are you have seen or met a woman who wears one, but you may still be wondering what it is. The hijab is the most common name for the headscarf that Muslim women wear. The hijab is a choice for Muslim women - some women to choose to wear it as a form of worship to God and to embody modesty. It is a reflection of one’s devotion and belief in God. There are approximately 1.6 billion Muslims across continents, which is the reason there are several hijab styles worn by women from different cultures and countries, spanning from Afghanistan to Indonesia, and each country has its own unique and traditional hijab style that women proudly wear. Each country has its own dashing style to be appreciated and celebrated!

PAKISTAN


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In Malala Yousafzai’s famous headshot, she styles her scarf the classic Pakistani way. She loosely drapes the scarf (also called dupatta in Pakistan) around her head and leaves a bit of her hair to peek through in the front. The colors range from dark colors to bright colors, matching traditional ethnic clothing. This style is always elegant, classy, and versatile for any look desired.

AFGHANISTAN


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Afghan women have often worn (and continue to) a unique type of hijab known as the burqa. The burqa is a long piece of clothing draped over the head of the woman and often drapes all the way down to the knees or ankles. This covers the entire face and leaves a spot for the eyes through a net type fabric. Burqas can be any color, but are usually blue in Afghanistan.

MALAYSIA


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Malaysia, budding with new Islamic fashion trends, is the hotspot for all new hijab trends. Malaysian hijab often consists of light or brightly colored hijabs and floral patterns. Drapes are beautiful created to add volume and provide full coverage of the hair.

INDONESIA


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Similar to Malaysia, Indonesia is always budding with new hijab trends. Indonesian-styled hijabs fully cover the hair and may incorporate undercaps underneath the hijab to create a more elaborate and unique look. Certain hijabs may have extra volume by having floral designs attached.

ETHIOPIA


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The Ethiopian hijab is worn by wrapping it like a turban. The turban fully covers the head and hair. Turbans are created with simply fabric or elaborate, colorful, traditional types. Turbans can be set in place with pins and brooches.

SOMALIA


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Like Ethiopian women, Somali women also style their hijabs by creating a turban. Turbans can be created with long scarves to create a more volumized look. Women may also wear an undercap to add multiple colors and patterns. Jewelry can also be worn, such as earrings.

SYRIA


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Syrian women frequently wear their hijab wrapped around their head and secured with pins. They often also wear undercaps and create drapes at the top of their head to add a unique design. In addition to fully covering the hair, this style covers the neck and partially the chest area.

PALESTINE


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The Palestinian hijab style consists of a tightly wrapped scarf, providing full coverage of hair and neck. Like the Syrian style, an undercap is usually worn to add volume and to help ensure the hijab stays in place as desired.

IRAN


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In Iran, women often wear what is known as the chador, a form of hijab. It is a long piece of cloth that drapes over the head and reaches to the waist (sometimes knees or ankles). The chador is often the color black and is a versatile, classy, dashing look.

TURKEY


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The Turkish hijab is very chic and classy. While still providing full coverage, the scarf is tied into an elegant bow on one side of the neck to add a feminine, chic look to it. The hijab looks best with volume and with a simple knot or bow to hold it in place.


The hijab is much more than a versatile piece of clothing worn by Muslim women - it is a symbol of a proud Muslim woman worshipping God by deciding to wear the hijab, regardless of style. These are just a few snapshots of how the hijab is worn beautifully across different countries. The hijab is a unifying force of Muslim women of all ages, backgrounds, ethnicities, and nationalities.

“It is girls like me who believe in education. It is girls like me who are Muslims and are proud of their religion who stand for education and believe in education. And we tell the world that all Muslims believe in education and believe in peace”.

Congratulations to Malala Yousafzai on her new role as United Nations Messenger of Peace!

As youngest-ever Messenger of Peace, Malala will focus on girls’ education. After her designation by Secretary-General António Guterres on Monday, she had a powerful message for the young girls of the world:

“You are the real change-makers. If you do not stand up, change will not come. If you want to see your future bright you have to start working now… Change starts with us and it starts now.”

📷: UN Social Media Team / Elif Gulec & UN Photo / Eskinder Debebe 

7

20 years ago today, the Bosnian people faced the greatest genocide in Europe since the Holocaust in World War II. Over a period of 11 days, more than 8,000 of the men and boys were massacred while the women faced unspeakable torture. All this while the UN “peacekeepers” watched from the safety of the surrounding hills. According to some eyewitness testimonies Dutch peacekeepers were among the refugees watching as the Serbs raped and murdered them. Those same “peacekeepers” had declared Srebrenica a “UN Safe Zone” before the Serbs came and killed everyone.

Why did the Serbs kill the Bosnians? Because the Bosnians are a proud European Muslim people. The Bosnians were killed for their Islam.

I will never forget when I met a Bosnian girl and her mother, both refugees, from that time.

“So where are you from?”
“I am from Srebrenica.”
“Where is the rest of your family?”

She gave me a slightly annoyed look as if to tell me I should know better, and repeated:

“I am from Srebrenica.”

~ Shibli Zaman

support muslims who don’t wear the hijab (and don’t particularly want to)

support muslims who work in the sex industry

support muslims who eat pork and/or drink alcohol

support muslims who are even the slightest bit openly expressive about their sexuality

support muslims that don’t pray 5 times a day (or at all)

support muslims that perform magick or witchcraft

support muslims that are lgbtq

support muslims whose race, gender, sexuality, or any other part of their identity is more salient to them than their faith

support muslims who don’t eat halal

support muslims who are ambivalent, doubtful, or even unhappy about their faith

support those who consider themselves “culturally muslim” because of their family, upbringing, location, law, or any other reason regardless of their actual faith

support muslims who are not proud of being muslim

support those who wish to leave Islam but can’t for any reason

support muslims who do not fit the “good muslim” trope, who get a lot of backlash from other muslims (sometimes to the point of persecution), who do not get featured in thinkpieces and hashtag campaigns about islam, who aren’t necessarily supported by non-muslims because of their history, whose relationship to islam is diverse and complex and deeply personal but is still valid anyway

anonymous asked:

So someone who is a muslim told me Linda sarsour one of the women who started the women's march wants sharia law and is super anti women rights in the Middle East. They sent me sources like breitbart and their conservative junk so I was wondering if you or any of your followers know anything? Because i don't trust those sources at all.

So I’ve looked this up and… These claims seem spurious and based on what a “liberal Muslim” should look like.

The claims that she “minimises” Saudia Arabian treatment of women comes from a single tweet where she said that women there got paid maternity leave. Pointing out a way that SA does something well is not a way of approving of anything negative they do.

She didn’t do the Charlie Hebdo support thing which people say makes her an extremist. I didn’t stand with Charlie Hebdo either, while I felt for the victims the movement seemed mostly about bashing Islam and forcing Muslim people into respectability politics, where they either agree and are “good Muslims” and if they disagree they are “bad Muslims”. They didn’t bother to look at her criticisms, choosing to believe that she was saying that she supports terrorism, rather than seeing that she just didn’t support the way the Charlie Hedbo thing was managed.

She refused to say “I am Charlie Hebdo” Stu therefore anything she had to say wasn’t relevant to some.

They say she minimises honor killings, yet all I have seen her say about this was against a film called Honor Diaries, and there was NOTHING negative said about the victims, she simply said that the producers and creators were islamaphobic. Which is true. She said that they didn’t need islamaphobes hijacking issues for them.

Regardless of where you stand on Ayaan Hirsi Ali, she is very vocally anti-Islam and, while she definitely has her reasons, there are other women who feel that Ali looks over other women and contributes to the problems they face.

The “she wants sharia law” claims are absurd. The people levying them don’t even know what sharia law is. It’s mostly property, marriage and inheritance law. Yes, some places have ridiculous versions of sharia law, yes some places will dole out lashings. But that’s not… That’s like saying “law is bad because is some countries law is used to murder gay people”.

Sharia Law is not inherently bad and it’s incredibly different from place to place. It’s not a terrifying boogeyman.

Now, the ONE criticism I could find that had some merit was that she is antisemitic. But it’s very, very hard to find anything because it’s all right wing media spruking the same nonsense over and over. She supports a more free and independent Palestine, which is not abnormal. The only thing I could find that was assuredly antisemitic was “zionism is creepy” which seems to overlook why Jewish people would want a safe homeland.

But any of the things about her having ties to Hamas is because she has some family who were in them. As far as I can tell she has never actively supported violence committed.

She also was a part of banning pro life “feminists” from the march, which many people are like “how DARE you silence these women” as though those women weren’t actively looking to control the bodily autonomy of anyone with a uterus.

From the research I have done, all the criticisms are REALLY badly sourced like, they literally show tweets of her lamenting that people don’t know what sharia law is and espousing some benefits as “evidence that she wants people to be forced into sharia law”.

99% if it is that she doesn’t fit the “progressive mold”, she’s proud to be religious, she’s defensive of her right to be and she won’t tolerate things that she sees as a threat to that without saying anything.

A feminist is not meant to be Muslim. She can probably be Christian but definitely not Muslim, it’s cultural image is at odds with the narrative constructed by western supremacists, who believe that we are just simply more advanced in every way.

Be critical of her if you want, hell… Be critical of EVERYONE. Buy a LOT of this criticism is simply because she has the audacity to be Muslim and proud.

Also, if anyone feels I am out of my lane here let me know. I tried to tread carefully and I recognise that many of these issues have a deep complexity that I myself will NEVER have to experience.

It cracks me up when white people try and twist things around like with Muhammad Ali they try and act like they loved him. They took years from his life because he was a Muslim and proud to be black (that’s the reason and I don’t care what anyone says). Like just be real about the hate you have for black people shinnin in any capacity and owning it. Don’t try and act buddy buddy once they are dead.

Originally posted by ihiphop

Allahaljalil.tumblr.com

[ Muslim Women struggling with the Hijab / Modesty ]

Make the internal changes before you make the external. If you change the outside before you change the inside, you’re doing it backwards.

Some ladies get a rush of fear, guilt or excitement and make changes because of that momentary feeling - which is not a bad thing Alhamdulilah it’s still progress. But there is a difference when a change is made from fear, and when it’s made from love.

If you do something out of fear, eventually that fear will wear off and if you’ve taken three steps forward, it is too easy to take two steps back. Sometimes even three or more.

If you do something out of love of Allah, fear will follow regardless. The one who loves Allah, Knows Allah, therefore without a doubt will fear Him. So if that person takes three steps forward, when their fear wears off - their love will prevent them from taking more then one step back. Becomes Imaan does have its highs and lows. We all try, fail, walk, fall and try again.

Learn, and learn properly. Love your religion, love your God, love your prophet, and hold the religion in your heart. You will be too proud not to want to show who you are. When you’ve internalised modesty, when you’re character is more Muslim then the way you look, it becomes easy to start showing your insides on the outside.

Too many ladies cover the outside and are still acting immodestly. Too many ladies wear the Hijab but the dress code is contradicting the cloth on their head. Don’t let it just be material, let It be the tool of your self expression. Let it be one of the most powerful things you do for the sake of Allah, the way you show who you are and what is dear to your heart. Be proud to be a Muslim, be proud to be the slave of Allah Almighty.     

5

Almost 22 years ago, the Bosnian people faced the greatest genocide in Europe since the Holocaust in World War II. Over a period of 11 days, more than 8,000 of the men and boys were massacred while the women faced unspeakable torture. All this while the UN “peacekeepers” watched from the safety of the surrounding hills.


According to some eyewitness testimonies Dutch peacekeepers were among the refugees watching as the Serbs raped and murdered them. Those same “peacekeepers” had declared Srebrenica a “UN Safe Zone” before the Serbs came and killed everyone.


Why did the Serbs kill the Bosnians? Because the Bosnians are a proud European Muslim people. The Bosnians were killed for their Islam.


I will never forget when I met a Bosnian girl and her mother, both refugees, from that time.


“So where are you from?”
“I am from Srebrenica.”
“Where is the rest of your family?”

She gave me a slightly annoyed look as if to tell me I should know better, and repeated:

“I am from Srebrenica.”

- Shibli Zaman

3

Muslims Against Homophobia and an LGBT Jewish Coalition consolidate their marching groups into one in a show of solidarity and rejection of islamophobia. Signs carried read, “LGBTQ Muslims exist”, “Allah has 99 names and a bigot is not one”, “I support full LGBTQ Inclusion in the Jewish community”, “Queer Muslim and PROUD”, “Queer Muslim against Islamophobia”, “Muslims stand firmly against homophobia”, “Islam taught me love”, and “Muslim Allies (heart) LGBTQ.” Twin Cities Pride. Minneapolis, MN. 2016.06.26.