music in public

anonymous asked:

with the inauguration coming up i was wondering if you knew more about pete wentz and politics?? you seem to be the go-to person

well for starters pete’s been political since the moment he was conceived and we can always thank joe biden for that, both of his parents being legislative assistants during his first time (x)(x). pete majored in political-science for three years while in college before getting serious with fall out boy and didn’t believe he had been politically active until 2008 while campaigning for obama despite his frequent prior involvement via music and publicity. pete and andy alongside fall out boy were also both apart of the band racetraitor in chicago’s underground music scene which “discussed issues like white privilege, class privilege, the war on drugs and biases in the us criminal justice system, inequities in economic globalization, and us foreign policies in latin american and the middle east. the name racetraitor was in reference to using one’s social and economic privilege to create a more egalitarian world.” (wikipedia being the best information accumulation, same for anything on arma angelus with tim mcllrath from rise against and eventually joe)

but many of fall out boy’s messages have generally always been mingled with political agendas and subtle cues all mixed up with relationship woes and the realism of mental illness, many times autobiographically.  obviously these things have always been the punk staple point and aren’t exclusive to fall out boy but particularly between 2001-2009 (and especially with folie a deux) there was emphasis. there’s been some analysis on how 9/11 was the catalyst for the foundation of early 2000′s emo as well.

folie a deux in particular though was written as a giant middle finger to the bush administration and this can be seen scattered throughout the album through a specific lense (x). as mentioned in the link i would suggest reading into the wars in afghanistan and iraq and the history that trails back to george w. bush’s father and their politics in the middle east. the album’s references are meant to be subtle and left to interpretation by the listener but many are very blatant like in 20 dollar nosebleed.

let’s not forget you’re crashing but you’re no wave from infinity on high which is about the trial of fred hampton jr. who was falsely accused of arson in a rigged trial in the aftermath of rodney king’s murder in 1993. fred hampton jr. was the son of fred hampton who was the leader of the illinois black panthers and was assassinated in his sleep by chicago pd. pete worked with a volunteer legal organization in chicago during the case and was inspired to write a song that further emphasized him as a black nationalist.

often times pete’s vocal disdains would show themselves in humor or subtle references - particularly in these two videos: this interview where he mentions that people care and know more about the media and celebrities than they do about the war in iraq – and goes on to examine a doll of george w. bush saying, “i hate this guy. this is the guy who runs hell when the devil’s up here hanging out.” the second stemming from kanye west during the hurricane katrina relief concert which pete again references in this video as a mock interviewer (3:50-4:05).

as mentioned before, pete was very politically active during obama’s presidential campaign in 2008. this involved encouraging voters to read about their candidates and developing a relationship with them and also to do something as simple as canvassing door-to-door as his father was doing in florida and columbus, ohio. he threw a campaign fundraiser in chicago, saying i have never really gotten involved in politics before. even in college, everyone just wanted to go out and get drunk and make bad decisions, sort of like we did when we elected george w. bush eight years ago. and to me, the goal of the event is to expose obama to people who may have misconceptions about him. for example, someone on our web site said, ‘i heard if he’s elected, he’s going to bomb the middle east,’ and i was like, ‘uh, no… that’s what our current president did.

ziam duo vibes✨✨

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Public Enemy’s Chuck D. traces the roots of Hip Hop to the Caribbean “toasting” tradition in tonight’s episode of SOUNDBREAKING, airing at 10/9c on PBS.

I could love you in a steam heat flat / words by Vincent Bryan ; music by J.B. Mullen. For voice and piano. Caption title. First line of text: Miss Mandy Johnson loved a man. First line of chorus: I don’t want to wait beneath the shelt'ring palms. Cover ill.: African American couple sitting on top of a radiator, his arm around her with a sign overhead reading, Notice to tenants, there will be plenty of steam all next summer. Photos of Rita Redmond and Harry Von Tilzer. On cover: 5. At bottom of p. 5: Lawson & Teller Co., New York, printed by E.A. Stege Co., New York. Ad with part of song, My little Coney Isle by Andrew B. Sterling and Harry Von Tilzer on back cover. Harry Von Tilzer Music Pub. Co., 1903.

  • Courtesy of the E. Azalia Hackley Collection of African Americans in the Performing Arts, Detroit Public Library

I just saw Selena come in and I hugged her so tight. She looks like a princess. I literally almost cried when I saw her. I haven’t talked to her in a long time. So, I don’t know what’s going on, but I gave her a huge hug and she looks beautiful. And I’m so happy that she’s here. I’m happy to see her out and about.“ - Ariana Grande talking about seeing Selena at the 2016 AMA