museo nacional de

El paraguas, fuente y columna escultórica diseñada por Pedro Ramírez Vázquez, decorada con un relieve en bronce de José Chávez Morado, Museo Nacional de Antropología, av. Paseo de la Reforma y Calzada Gandhi, Bosque de Chapultepec, Polanco, Miguel Hidalgo, Ciudad de México 1964

Arqs. Pedro Ramírez Vázquez, Rafael Mijares y Jorge Campuzano

The Paraguas (Umbrella), fountain and sculptural column designed by Pedro Ramirez Vazquez with bronze bas relief sculpture by Jose Chavez Morado, National Museum of Anthropology, Paseo de la Reforma at Gandhi, Chapultepec Park,  Polanco, Miguel Hidalgo, Mexico City 1964

anonymous asked:

Hey, I love you blog, it's fantastic! Can you post anything of the mexican architecture or of the Mexico City, please?

Thanks! I have posted projects from México many many times! You can see posts of art and architecture of México here.

There are really so many projects I would love to include in this post that it was close to impossible choosing only six. Here are six of my favorite projects in México City, el DF:

Residencia Luis Barragán

Keep reading

Vista de la fachada lateral, Museo Nacional de Antropología, av. Paseo de la Reforma y Calzada Gandhi, Bosque de Chapultepec, Polanco, Miguel Hidalgo, Ciudad de México 1964

Arqs. Pedro Ramírez Vázquez, Rafael Mijares y Jorge Campuzano

Foto. Armando Salas Portugal

View of the side facade,  National Museum of Anthropology, Paseo de la Reforma at Gandhi, Chapultepec Park, Paseo de la Reforma, Polanco, Miguel Hidalgo, Mexico City 1964

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Leonora Carrington OBE (6 April 1917 – 25 May 2011) was an English-born Mexican artist, surrealist painter, and novelist. She lived most of her adult life in Mexico City, and was one of the last surviving participants in the Surrealist movement of the 1930s.

Leonora Carrington was also a founding member of the Women’s Liberation Movement in Mexico during the 1970s

Following the escape to Lisbon, Carrington arranged passage out of Europe with Renato Leduc, a Mexican Ambassador. Leduc was a friend of Pablo Picasso, and agreed to marry Carrington just for the travel arrangements.

Events from this period continued to inform her work. She lived and worked in Mexico after spending part of the 1960s in New York City.

While in Mexico, she was asked, in 1963, to create a mural which she named El Mundo Magico de los Mayas, and which was influenced by folk stories from the region.

The mural is now located in the Museo Nacional de Antropología in Mexico City.

Carrington designed Mujeres conscienscia (1973), a poster, for the Women’s Liberation movement in Mexico, depicting a ‘new eve’.

Carrington, personally and primarily focused on psychic freedom, understood that such freedom could not be achieved until political freedom is also accomplished.

Through these beliefs, Carrington understood that “greater cooperation and sharing of knowledge between politically active women in Mexico and North America” was important for emancipation.

Carrington’s political commitment led to her winning the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Women’s Caucus for Art convention in New York in 1986.

I didn’t have time to be anyone’s muse… I was too busy rebelling against my family and learning to be an artist.