murder mystery arc

On the whole did or didn’t Rose kill pink diamond murder mystery arc. I keep remembering way back to Avatar the last air bender. There was en episode where Aang went on trial or a murder committed in his past life. They collected a bunch of evident to prove the avatar innocent then at the last moment avatar Kyoshi manifested and confessed then left Aang to hang. 

SDCC 2017 Zach Callison Interview

Rewind and Pause interviewed Zach Callison in this fifteen-minute interview. Here’s a sorta-transcript–not word for word, but basically what the questions are and how he answered, paraphrased.

Question: What inspired you to wear that today?

Zach: This is my style now. I’m getting into fashion and music, trying to create an aesthetic. My designer’s father was the designer for Elvis.

Question: Over the series, Steven has grown up while maintaining innocence. How do you portray a character who’s had to maintain innocence while dealing with all that horror around him?

Zach: His innocence is part of who he is. He’ll always have childlike energy. He’s happy-go-lucky. But the things that happen to him make him be tested, make him more serious, make him more practical. His arc is those two things fighting against each other. It’s hard to maintain that balance.

Question: Because of all that change, is there something that you, as a voice actor, want for Steven at the end of this storyline? [Not sure I heard this right–it was noisy.]

Zach: I try not to do that as much. I don’t even read the storyboards before the session because I like to discover it as I read. I want some closure for Steven, which is hard because no one knows, but they reach a point where there’s only so much they can tell him. It’s hard for him to process all the information about his mom and all the unknowns.

Question: There are a lot of episodes where Steven is narrating as it goes along because he might be the only speaking character on the screen for minutes as a time. How do you approach that to keep it interesting?

Zach: Expository dialogue is really hard to make legitimate and not explanatory. The writers keep it natural. I talk to myself a lot, he has liberty to do that as well. The show is called Steven Universe and it’s always from his perspective, we ALWAYS see the show through his eyes. So the device of having him talk to himself helps. That’s more justification for it, that and it being a kids’ show. I didn’t even realize it was a writing device until Rebecca explained it to me. Genius!

Question: You’ve been voicing Steven for four years–

Zach: Five years, since the pilot.

Question: So what’s the most challenging thing about voicing Steven in Season 4?

Zach: My voice change has stabilized now, but it’s still hard. I get sick a lot, so I have to take care of my voice a lot. It’s easier now, and I spend so much time with him that it’s second nature. New characters, I don’t have that opportunity. It’s more the physical limitations than mental or emotional.

Question: How has growing up with Steven changed you?

Zach: We’ve grown up together. It’s affected that arc and my ability to relate to struggling with who you are, growing up with more responsibility on your shoulders. Rebecca said they want a real kid to play Steven, and that’s a benefit. And it’s opened so many doors for me, and it’s an amazing opportunity to be around people who view art with a purpose. They care about their message and have passion. That experience has been formative for me.

Question: I wanna know what your favorite aspect of Steven is and what was your biggest shocking moment.

Zach: I love his sense of humor and that he always gives people a chance. Example: He’s fighting Bismuth and he throws something at her while telling her to watch out. It’s insightful to who he is as a person. Violence is the last resort. He tries to talk it out first. What shocked me the most was the whole Lars thing. I knew about it coming up, and then oh, that on screen, wow. It was very dramatic. It was a challenge to act. I call it actor candy. We get a lot of it.

Question: Like to kind of Jesus Lars back to life?

Zach: Jesus as a verb! It was really cool. Their relationship has been rocky. Steven wants to be his friend and Lars wasn’t always there. I think this really cemented their friendship. I love anytime I get to work with Matt Moy and when they get to interact. It’s an example of how sometimes he bridges the gap. Their relationship ended stronger.

Question: Do you have any Larses to whom you have been a Steven, and have you ever been a Lars to a Steven?

Zach: I’ve never resurrected someone from the dead. Not yet. There’s a lot of life left to live, we’ll see. I’ve had childhood friends trying to be cool and didn’t want to hang out with a tiny kid that I was. (I didn’t grow for a very long time.) It wasn’t bullying, per se, but like “I wanna be cool and you’re not cool so I don’t wanna be around you.”

Question: So you’re quite a musician. Piano, dabbling in rock. Do you play any Steven music?

Zach: No, haven’t learned any songs on instruments. I love doing covers, I took them down because I was very young. My friends called me “the Drops of Jupiter kid.” I’m playing less than I should. It’s been all about writing songs lately and trying to get them in the studio. I am dropping a single this fall ideally! Current plan. Start gigging and do what I love.

Question: Will you be doing it under your name?

Zach: Yes. I’ll be playing as Zach Callison. I’ll be hiring a band, it’s rock music, I’ll be playing the rock way, but I’ve done the actual band thing and it’s impossible to keep together, so I decided to become a creative tyrant and take over the reins.

Question: Tell us about the Zach Callison show!

Zach: In the works. Sketch comedy show about making a sketch comedy show, very meta. We have digital shorts and a character development aspect. I’m teasing it on my social media. We’re gonna go around pitching it.

Question: Music: have you talked to Rebecca, or Aivi & Surasshu about it?

Zach: Yes, I’ve sent to Rebecca for notes. Aivi hasn’t heard my music, but she’s been supportive.

Question: Steven has been working through the stages of grief on his mom, talk about that.

Zach: At first he just wanted to meet his mom, questions about who she was, and now he almost wishes he didn’t know. He still doesn’t know definitive answers about a lot of things. The Gems not giving him the truth really frustrated him.

Question: What will it take for him to forgive her?

Zach: I don’t know the whole story. I don’t know if he can at this point. Lots of things wouldn’t be told to him. I’ll have to find out eventually.

Question: You love the Cookie Cat rap, what else do you really love?

Zach: If you need a great actor, you’ve come to the right guy! And the Peter Pizzapopolous thing. Rebecca found out I speak Italian semi-fluently, so we’ve been working that in more. It’s fun.

Question: Following up on Cookie Cat, it’s predicted the whole show.

Zach: Some fans comment on that. I didn’t even think, once I found out the Gems are aliens, I asked if that was intentional.

Question: People love the song, how do you feel about it being blown up?

Zach: Yeah, it’s great, people request me to do it at cons all the time.

Question: Which of the relationships YOU have with Deedee, Michaela, or Estelle mirrors Steven’s relationship with the respective Gem most?

Zach: All of them. From them to me and Grace, I always see us as really similar. The relationship between Deedee and me is like she’s my second mom. She comes up before my mom in my phone because she’s entered as Bird Mom. Michaela feels like a big sister. It’s cool to have that dynamic.

Question: What can we look forward to in Season Five?

Zach: We showed some stuff in the panel. Lots of drama, but I can’t say, I’m not qualified. It’s a murder mystery coming, crazy story arcs we may or may not pursue, but I know too much and I’ve said too much.

anonymous asked:

Okay you seem not to mind my excessive asks so here goes another one: How far do you think Ciel would be willing to go for the dick? Like would he just order sebastian or would he reach the point of literal begging? Would he wait for sebastian to come to him? Would he beat around the bush completely unnecessarily or would he be more straightforward? (Also I’m glad you like receiving these asks, it’s nice to have someone feed my desire for sebaciel headcanons)

Ciel would go to great lengths for the dick, as you would say. But he does not beg, nor does he order Sebastian to touch him. He’s much less straightforward. He prefers to play, to entice his demon and make a game out of it. He has remarkable patience when it comes to these matters. I mean, have you read the murder mystery arc? It is hands-down their longest and most elaborate act of foreplay. But once he has Sebastian in his bed, or Sebastian has him on his desk, or wherever else they may wind up, Ciel is not above begging. He’s already won, he’s already seduced a demon, and when he’s been worked over for the past hour, had his orgasm withheld from him multiple times, pushed to the brink and then pulled back over and over, he is not ashamed to let a sorry plea leave his lips, “Please, Sebastian… Just let me finish. I want to come.” But still, he will never order him. That is not what their contract is for, and he will not abuse it in that way, even though he wants nothing more than to finish and have Sebastian finish inside him and then clean him up and put him to bed. 

anonymous asked:

I am going to DM for a couple of my friends for the first time here soon, so uh do you have any bits of advice for a new DM?

Someone asked about this a while ago too, so here’s my attempt at advice:

First of all. Deep breaths. DMing is SO much fun and it seems a lot harder than it actually is before you just sit down and do it. So don’t worry about completely ruining the game or anything, because that’s almost certainly not going to happen. You’re gonna be TOTALLY fine and you’ll (hopefully) have a great time doing the most fun part of dnd.

I think the number one thing to remember when you’re a DM before you even get started preparing ANYTHING is that your job is to make the game as entertaining as possible for your players. That means keeping in mind what their interests are and what they want to be doing in the game. The way I did this, and in my opinion the easiest way, is to have a session zero and talk with your players about what exactly they want to have happen. Are they all about action with little actual plot, or would they want to be interacting with NPCs all the time? Do they like puzzles and riddles, or do they absolutely hate them? My players happen to really like figuring out the puzzles I throw at them, so when I was designing a cave system at one point, I leaned more heavily towards puzzles than just straight up combat. I also asked them before I started planning out the next leg of their journey if they would be interested in exploring their character’s backgrounds or not, and once I got a positive answer I started to incorporate them more. Even when we’re in the middle of a session, I’ll check in with them and make sure they’re all having fun. Even brutal encounters that leave them just a few hit points away from dying or intense moral dilemmas that leave them scrambling should still be FUN on some level, even if that’s a little morbid. To summarize: if the players are having fun, then you’re doing your job right, so check in with them to make sure everything is going well.

Okay, on to the rest of it. Here’s another important thing to remember: no matter how carefully you plan out something ahead of time, your players WILL find some new solution to the situation you didn’t plan on. My first session with my current group, I ended up improvising a story for a solid hour and a half because instead of the party sneakily stealing a map in the dead of night like I’d naively assumed they’d do, they just grabbed it right out of the owner’s hand and demanded information from him, which lead to a lot of key information being revealed WAY ahead of schedule. My point is this: get used to improvising, and don’t get too attached to the story you have prepared. Sometimes your players will come up with something better than what you wrote. Don’t squash down their idea just because you wrote something else ahead of time! Get ready to make stuff up on the fly, and reward creative solutions. Or, if they’re making bad decisions and messing up something you thought wouldn’t be a problem, let the natural consequences of their actions happen in game. NOTHING is set in stone, and the game is more fun that way. You’d be surprised at some of the really awesome stuff you can come up with under pressure. So let your story evolve based on what your players decide to do, and don’t be afraid of improvisation.

What else, what else… okay, another important thing is to avoid a TPK early on, especially if you’re all new, but not to be afraid to rough your players up because the game isn’t any fun if they automatically win everything. Sometimes it can be really tricky to find the balance. Erring on the side of too easy is probably the way to go early on, because if you’re all new and figuring this all out together you’re all going to start out by making some pretty dumb mistakes and having your first ever character die in their first battle isn’t the best introduction to dnd ever. Plus, it’s fun to feel like a badass when you totally destroy something sometimes. On the other hand, if you make an encounter way too hard, there are ways to come back from that as well. Don’t let your players get away unscathed, but maybe your monster “forgets” to recharge their breath weapon, or an NPC ends up rolling 10 points of damage instead of 22. Or, maybe someone finds an old potion of healing inside a chest that you definitely planned on being there ahead of time. Just remember that THEY don’t know exactly what you have in your notes, and adjust accordingly. The Kobold Fight Club is your best friend for encounters, by the way. Sometimes the CR is a bit off, especially for larger groups, but it’s been really useful for me to help scale encounters so far.

As for inspiration for planning the story, I’ve found that pulling from character’s back stories is great. It grounds your players in the setting, and helps them feel like they really are incorporated in the game instead of being random murder hobos. I’ve also gotten inspiration from poking around the dnd subreddit and the tag on tumblr. You probably shouldn’t copy other people’s ideas directly, but there’s nothing wrong with using elements in them as a stepping stone towards your own campaign’s plot. Think about what you find interesting in a story, and TALK TO YOUR PLAYERS about what they would find interesting. Just run little things by them, like, “Hey, how would you all feel about doing a murder mystery arc” or “Would you like to really get into so-and-so’s origin story?” Getting a direction to go in from your players can be fantastic, both for you and for them.

Last point I’m gonna make since this got pretty long (sorry about that lol): DON’T BE AFRAID TO ASK FOR HELP! I ask people (who aren’t my players) for help planning the campaign all. the. time. My twelve year old sister knows EVERYTHING I have planned since I’ve used her as a soundboard for different ideas so often. If you scroll through my dnd tag, you can see all the times I’ve asked my followers and other blogs for help planning and running a campaign. There are tons of people on tumblr and Reddit and all over the internet that would be more than happy to help you with any specific questions you have. If you feel stuck - feel free to ask for advice! There’s probably someone else out there who had the same question at one point and would be willing to help you out.

GOOD LUCK YOU CAN DO THIS I BELIEVE IN YOU

yashaagard  asked:

so i heard you're a dm-- i'm trying to assemble my party and write a story but i have no clue what i'm doing. do you have any tips???

I’m gonna start this with a disclaimer: I’m a pretty new DM myself, so if that makes you want to take this with a grain of salt, that’s totally fair and I would definitely recommend getting advice from a bunch of people. That being said, here we go:

I think the number one thing to remember when you’re a DM before you even get started preparing ANYTHING is that your job is to make the game as entertaining as possible for your players. That means keeping in mind what their interests are and what they want to be doing in the game. The way I did this, and in my opinion the easiest way, is to have a session zero and talk with your players about what exactly they want to have happen. Are they all about action with little actual plot, or would they want to be interacting with NPCs all the time? Do they like puzzles and riddles, or do they absolutely hate them? My players happen to really like figuring out the puzzles I throw at them, so when I was designing a cave system at one point, I leaned more heavily towards puzzles than just straight up combat. I also asked them before I started planning out the next leg of their journey if they would be interested in exploring their character’s backgrounds or not, and once I got a positive answer I started to incorporate them more. Even when we’re in the middle of a session, I’ll check in with them and make sure they’re all having fun. Even brutal encounters that leave them just a few hit points away from dying or intense moral dilemmas that leave them scrambling should still be FUN on some level, even if that’s a little morbid. To summarize: if the players are having fun, then you’re doing your job right, so check in with them to make sure everything is going well.

Okay, on to the rest of it. Here’s another important thing to remember: no matter how carefully you plan out something ahead of time, your players WILL find some new solution to the situation you didn’t plan on. My first session with my current group, I ended up improvising a story for a solid hour and a half because instead of the party sneakily stealing a map in the dead of night like I’d naively assumed they’d do, they just grabbed it right out of the owner’s hand and demanded information from him, which lead to a lot of key information being revealed WAY ahead of schedule. My point is this: get used to improvising, and don’t get too attached to the story you have prepared. Sometimes your players will come up with something better than what you wrote. Don’t squash down their idea just because you wrote something else ahead of time! Get ready to make stuff up on the fly, and reward creative solutions. Or, if they’re making bad decisions and messing up something you thought wouldn’t be a problem, let the natural consequences of their actions happen in game. NOTHING is set in stone, and the game is more fun that way. You’d be surprised at some of the really awesome stuff you can come up with under pressure. So let your story evolve based on what your players decide to do, and don’t be afraid of improvisation.

What else, what else… okay, another important thing is to avoid a TPK early on, especially if you’re all new, but not to be afraid to rough your players up because the game isn’t any fun if they automatically win everything. Sometimes it can be really tricky to find the balance. Erring on the side of too easy is probably the way to go early on, because if you’re all new and figuring this all out together you’re all going to start out by making some pretty dumb mistakes and having your first ever character die in their first battle isn’t the best introduction to dnd ever. Plus, it’s fun to feel like a badass when you totally destroy something sometimes. On the other hand, if you make an encounter way too hard, there are ways to come back from that as well. Don’t let your players get away unscathed, but maybe your monster “forgets” to recharge their breath weapon, or an NPC ends up rolling 10 points of damage instead of 22. Or, maybe someone finds an old potion of healing inside a chest that you definitely planned on being there ahead of time. Just remember that THEY don’t know exactly what you have in your notes, and adjust accordingly. The Kobold Fight Club is your best friend for encounters, by the way. Sometimes the CR is a bit off, especially for larger groups, but it’s been really useful for me to help scale encounters so far.

As for inspiration for planning the story, I’ve found that pulling from character’s back stories is great. It grounds your players in the setting, and helps them feel like they really are incorporated in the game instead of being random murder hobos. I’ve also gotten inspiration from poking around the dnd subreddit and the tag on tumblr. You probably shouldn’t copy other people’s ideas directly, but there’s nothing wrong with using elements in them as a stepping stone towards your own campaign’s plot. Think about what you find interesting in a story, and TALK TO YOUR PLAYERS about what they would find interesting. Just run little things by them, like, “Hey, how would you all feel about doing a murder mystery arc” or “Would you like to really get into so-and-so’s origin story?” Getting a direction to go in from your players can be fantastic, both for you and for them.

Last point I’m gonna make since this got pretty long (sorry about that lol): DON’T BE AFRAID TO ASK FOR HELP! I ask people (who aren’t my players) for help planning the campaign all. the. time. My twelve year old sister knows EVERYTHING I have planned since I’ve used her as a soundboard for different ideas so often. If you scroll through my dnd tag, you can see all the times I’ve asked my followers and other blogs for help planning and running a campaign. There are tons of people on tumblr and Reddit and all over the internet that would be more than happy to help you with any specific questions you have. If you feel stuck - feel free to ask for advice! There’s probably someone else out there who had the same question at one point and would be willing to help you out.

GOOD LUCK YOU CAN DO THIS I BELIEVE IN YOU

3

Black Butler Cross-Arc AU;

“Mr. Wordsmith. Did you know that man?”
“I…I never met him before in my life…”
“Why were you mourning?”
“He didn’t have to die. I saw no difference between him and those children..”

Arthur accompanies Ciel Phantomhive, the Queen’s “Watch Dog,” as a useful, loyal pawn after the events which conspired that dark, stormy night…