municipal official

They bought a whole town for weed

“We are excited to lead the charge for a true green rush,” American Green’s president David Gwyther said in a statement to Time.

“The cannabis revolution that’s going on here in the US has the power to completely revitalise communities in the same way gold did during the 19th Century.”

Nipton was originally founded during the gold rush in the early 20th Century when the precious metal was found nearby.

California is one of eight US states where recreational marijuana is legal.

Nipton - which has a population of about 20 - sits on the border of California and Nevada.

American Green wants to invest up to $2.5m (£1.9m) in revitalising the town to make it more tourist-friendly as well as eco-friendly.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/40824837/marijuana-company-buys-entire-us-town-to-create-cannabis-friendly-municipality

@mojave-wasteland-official

A Relic of Thermidor

Recently, I acquired this item as an addition to my humble collection of revolutionary “souvenirs”: a copy of the official Bulletin des lois of the French Republic, n.° 29. It records the decrees that the National Convention passed in the fateful session of 9 Thermidor, Year II (27 July 1794), between around 1 o’clock in the afternoon and midnight. This bulletin consists of eight pages, and its measurements are 18 x 12.1 cm (7.1 x 4.7 inches).

The Bulletin des lois was instituted by the decree of 14 Frimaire, upon the proposal of Billaud-Varenne ; the purpose was to render the decisions of the National Convention more transparent, as well as to make its decrees more well-known in the local communes of the Republic. The first issue of the was published on 22 Prairial (10 June 1794), and even if its name was changed several times, the institution of the Bulletin was continued until 1931.

The session of 9 Thermidor started around 11 o’clock in the morning ; although we do not have an authentic record, the events are well-known. Following several interventions (notably by Tallien, Billaud-Varenne, Barère, Vadier, Bourdon de l’Oise), Louchet proposed a décret d’arrestation against Maximilien Robespierre, which was passed by the Convention (n.° 131). Famously, Augustin Robespierre demanded to share his brother’s fate, which resulted in a décret d’arrestation being passed against him, too (n.° 132). After several more interventions, further decrees were voted against Couthon and Saint-Just, as well as against Lebas, who, in turn, demanded to share the fate of his allies and friends (n.° 133). Dumas, the president of the tribunal, was arrested, as were numerous high-ranking officials of the National Guard, i.e. Hanriot, Boulanger, Lavallete, Dufraise, d’Aubigny and Sijas (n.° 134). Several decrees were passed in order to prevent or contain the ensuing insurrection: the suppression of every rank above chef de légion (n.° 135), the summoning of the municipality and the department (n.° 136), the appointment of Barras to general of the Parisian armed forces (n.° 137), and the mise hors la loi of M. Robespierre, A. Robespierre, Couthon, Saint-Just and Lebas (n.° 138), as well as of the municipal officials who were taking part in the insurrection (n.° 139). Finally, the Convention passed a decree that forbade the sections to support the Commune’s insurrection (n.° 140), as well as a well-known proclamation to the French people (n.° 141).


(N°. 131) LAW which orders that Maximilien Robespierre will be put under arrest.

9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible.

THE NATIONAL CONVENTION DECREES that Maximilien Robespierre, one of its members, will immediately be put under arrest.

Stamped by the inspector. Signed S. E. MONNEL.

Collated with the original, by us, the president and secretaries of the National Convention. Paris, 9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible. Signed COLLOT-D'HERBOIS, president ; A. DUMONT, BRIVAL and LEGENDRE, secretaries.

(N°. 132). LAW ordering that Robespierre the younger will be put under arrest.

9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible.

THE NATIONAL CONVENTION DECREES […]


[…] that Robespierre the younger, one of its members, will immediately be put under arrest.

Stamped by the inspector. Signed S. E. MONNEL.

Collated with the original, by us, the president and secretaries of the National Convention. Paris, 9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible. Signed COLLOT-D'HERBOIS, president ; A. DUMONT, BRIVAL and LEGENDRE, secretaries.

(N.° 133.) LAW ordering that Saint-Just, Couthon and Lebas will be put under arrest.

9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible.

THE NATIONAL CONVENTION DECREES that Saint-Just, Couthon and Lebas, three of its members, will immediately put under arrest.

Stamped by the inspector. Signed S. E. MONNEL.

Collated with the original, by us, the president and secretaries of the National Convention. Paris, 9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible. Signed THURIOT, ex-president ; BAR, A. DUMONT and PORTIEZ, secretaries.

(N.° 134.) LAW which puts Dumas, president of the revolutionary tribunal, Henriot and other leaders and officers of the National Guard of Paris, under arrest.

9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible.

THE NATIONAL CONVENTION DECREES that Dumas, president of the revolutionary tribunal, Henriot, Boulanger, Lavalette, Dufraise, leaders of the national guard of Paris as well as the general adjutants and aides-de-camp of Hanriot; and d’Aubigni, former assistant of the minister of war, and Prosper Sijas, assistant in the commission of the movement and organisation of ground forces, will be put under arrest. 

Stamped by the inspector. Signed S. E. MONNEL.

Collated with the original, by us, the president and secretaries of the National Convention. Paris, 9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible. Signed COLLOT-D'HERBOIS, president ; A. DUMONT, BRIVAL and LEGENDRE, secretaries.

(N.° 135.) LAW which suppresses every rank [that is] superior to the one of chef de légion, and charges the mayor of Paris, the national agent and the one who will be responsible for commanding the national guard, with ensuring the security of the national representation.

9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible.

THE NATIONAL CONVENTION, after having heard the report of its Committees of Public Safety and General Security, DECREES:

ART. 1. Every command, every rank [that is] superior to the one of chef de légion, are suppressed.

The National Guard will resume its original organisation; consequently, each chef de légion will command in his turn.

2. The mayor of Paris, the national agent, and the one who will be in charge of commanding the National Guard, will ensure the security of the national representation : […]


[…] they will be accountable, on their life, for all the troubles which could occur in Paris.

The present decree will immediately be sent to the mayor of Paris. 

Stamped by the inspector. Signed S. E. MONNEL.

Collated with the original, by us, the president and secretaries of the National Convention. Paris, 9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible. Signed COLLOT-D'HERBOIS, president ; A. DUMONT, BRIVAL and LEGENDRE, secretaries.

(N.° 136.) LAW which summons to the bar of the Convention the municipality and the department of Paris.

9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible.

THE NATIONAL CONVENTION DECREES that the municipality and the department of Paris will instantly be summoned to the bar in order to receive the indication of the orders of the National Convention there. 

Stamped by the inspector. Signed S. E. MONNEL.

Collated with the original, by us, the president and secretaries of the National Convention. Paris, 9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible. Signed THURIOT, ex-president ; BAR, LEVASSEUR (de la Meurthe) and A. DUMONT, secretaries.

(N.° 137.) LAW which appoints the representative of the people Barras to commandant-general of the armed force of Paris.

9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible.

THE NATIONAL CONVENTION, after having heard its two committees of Public Safety and of General Security, DECREES that the representative of the people Barras is appointed to commandant-general of the armed force of Paris, which will be obliged to obey him in everything that he will order to it.

Stamped by the inspector. Signed S. E. MONNEL.

Collated with the original, by us, the president and secretaries of the National Convention. Paris, 9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible. Signed THURIOT, ex-president ; LEVASSEUR (de la Meurthe) and A. DUMONT, secretaries.

(N.° 138.) LAW ordering that Robespierre the elder and all who escaped the décret d’arrestation [that was] issued against them, are outlawed.

9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible.

THE NATIONAL CONVENTION, after having heard its Committees of General Security and Public Safety, DECREES that Robespierre the elder and all those who escaped the décret d’arrestation [that was] issued against them, are outlawed. 

Stamped by the inspector. Signed S. E. MONNEL.

Collated with the original, by us, the president and secretaries of the National Convention. Paris, 9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible. Signed VOULLAND, ex-president ; BAR, LEVASSEUR (de la Meurthe) and PORTIEZ, secretaries.

(N.° 139.) LAW ordering that the mayor and the rebel municipal officers of the commune of Paris, are outlawed.

9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible.

THE NATIONAL CONVENTION DECREES that the mayor, all municipal  and notable officers […]


[…] of the commune of Paris who have taken part in the rebellion, and who have received in their midst the individuals [whose arrest was] decreed, are outlawed.

Stamped by the inspector. Signed S. E. MONNEL.

Collated with the original, by us, the president and secretaries of the National Convention. Paris, 9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible. Signed VOULLAND, ex-president ; BAR, LEVASSEUR (de la Meurthe) and PORTIEZ, secretaries.

(N.° 140.) LAW which forbids to the sections of Paris to obey the municipality, [which was] outlawed.

9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible.

THE NATIONAL CONVENTION counts on the zeal, the patriotism and the loyalty of the sections of Paris towards the indivisible Republic, and expressly forbids them to obey to a conspiratorial municipality which the National Convention just outlawed.

The present decree will immediately be sent to the 48 sections of Paris. 

Stamped by the inspector. Signed S. E. MONNEL.

Collated with the original, by us, the president and secretaries of the National Convention. Paris, 9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible. Signed THURIOT, ex-president ; LEVASSEUR (de la Meurthe) and A: DUMONT, secretaries.

(N.° 141.) PROCLAMATION of the National Convention, to the French People.

9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible.

CITIZENS,

Amidst the most significant victories, a new danger threatens the Republic; it is especially great, as public opinion is weakened, and as a part of the citizens lets itself be led to the abyss by the ascendant of some reputations.

The works of the Convention are infertile, the courage of the armies becomes nil, if the French citizens weigh up a few men and the patrie. Personal passions have usurped the rank of the public good, some leaders of the armed force seem to threaten the national authority.

The revolutionary government, subject of the hatred of the enemies of France, is attacked in our midst; the forms of republican power reach their ruin; the aristocracy seems to triumph, and the royalists are ready to reappear.

Citizens, do you want to lose six years of the revolution, of sacrifices and of courage within one day? Do you want to return under the yoke which you have smashed? No, no doubt. The National Convention will not cease for one moment to watch over the rights of public liberty. Thus, it invites the citizens of Paris, to the aid of their reunion, of their intelligence, of their patriotism for the preservation of the precious trust which the French people has confided to it; so that they primarily watch over the military authority, always ambitious, and often usurping. Liberty is nothing in the country where the military is in charge of the civil life. […]


[…] If you do not support the national representation, the constituted authorities are without subordination and the armies without direction; the victories become a curse, and the French people is delivered to all furies of the interior divisions and to all vengeances of tyrants. Hear the voice of the patrie, instead of combining your cries with the ones of the malevolent, of the aristocrats and of the enemies of the people, and the patrie will again be saved once more.

THE NATIONAL CONVENTION DECREES that the present proclamation will be printed immediately and sent to all sections of Paris, to all communes and to the armies of the Republic. 

Stamped by the inspector. Signed S. E. MONNEL.

Collated with the original, by us, the president and secretaries of the National Convention. Paris, 9 Thermidor, second year of the French Republic, one and indivisible. Signed THURIOT, ex-president ; LEVASSEUR (de la Meurthe) and A. DUMONT, secretaries.

Conform copy: The members of the agency of the dispatch of Laws

Bernard, Grandville.


While this piece certainly differs from my other revolutionary “souvenirs”, I am pleased to add it to my small collection ; it is a record of one of the most fateful days of the Revolution, a humble relic of eventful times.

What do you think, citizens? Have a nice day!

4

We need to talk about these traffic lights in Vienna. At 47 different pedestrian crossings around the city, red and green crosswalk lights are flashing images of stick-figure couples, some same-sex and some different-sex. (Meaning, of course, that some couples have both figures wearing dresses/capes and some do not.) It’s a hat tip to the Life Ball, upcoming HIV/AIDS fundraisers, Eurovision and a general movement toward acceptance.

Reactions have obviously been mixed:

The Freedom Party has announced it is lodging a criminal complaint against Vienna Councilwoman Maria Vassilakou, who is in charge of traffic issues in the city.

Party officials say the lights contravene traffic regulations and are a waste of taxpayers’ money at a cost of 63,000 euros ($70,000).

The city in turn says that the lights conform to laws — and are meant not only to show tolerance. Municipal officials say they also hope the signals will draw more attention from pedestrians and reduce jay-walking.

Vienna!! I am happily baffled. (via the Huffington Post)

anonymous asked:

Forgive my ignorance, but is it true that Robespierre visited Marie Therese Charlotte in the temple? Did he really consider marrying her?

Hello! Thanks for your message. :)

Concerning Robespierre’s (alleged) visit to Marie-Thérèse Charlotte: her English Wikipedia page claims that Robespierre visited her in prison on 11 May 1794, although without giving any source. I suppose the origin of this myth lies in the memoirs of Marie-Thérèse herself:

One day, a man came, I believe that it was Robespierre ; the municipal officials had great respect for him. His visit was a secret for the people of the Tower, who did not know who he was, or who did not want to tell me. He watched me insolently, cast his eyes on my books, and, after having searched [them] along with the municipal officials, he left.

All of this sounds rather vague, and Marie-Thérèse herself admits not being sure that it was Robespierre at all. The date given in the aforementioned article, 11 May 1794, seems to trace back to M. de Beauchesne, who claims that, according to Marie-Thérèse, said visit took place on the day after Madame Élisabeth’s execution. Personally, I don’t think that there is any reason to assume that it was really Robespierre who visited Marie-Thérèse in prison ; I checked the major biographies of Robespierre, and they either contest its authenticity or omit the incident completely.

Now, as to the story that Robespierre intended to marry Marie-Thérèse, this is but a Thermidorian fabrication. The rumour was apparently already in circulation on 10 Thermidor, the implication being that Robespierre wanted to become the king of France ; there were numerous pamphlets dedicated to this story (such as Nouveaux et intéressants détails de l'horrible conspiration de Robespierre et ses complices. Pièces trouvées sous les scellés de ces scélérats. Complicité d'Hanriot pour seconder leurs infâmes desseins en faisant assassiner la Convention nationale et marier la fille Capet à Robespierre pour régner ensemble et faire mourir quatre-vingt mille citoyens), and in general, rumours about Robespierre’s alleged aspiration to become king were quite common (e.g. the story about the fleur-de-lys seal at the Hôtel de Ville), although, obviously, purely fabricated by the Thermidorians, as Vadier himself later conceded (“The danger of losing one’s head made one imaginative.”). In this context, it can be assumed that the rumour of Robespierre’s alleged visit to Marie-Thérèse was of service to the Thermidorians in attempting to establish the myth of Robespierre’s “royal aspirations”, which may account for its popularity.

I hope I have been able to help you ; in case you have further questions, let me know. :) Have a nice day!

anonymous asked:

now that it's been a week since the election, do you have any more suggestions for what people can do?

Sorry it took a couple days for me to get to this, anon. Here’s a non-comprehensive list of suggestions:

  • Call out bigotry when you see it. Obviously there are some situations where this isn’t an option (e.g. you’re in the closet and you’re worried about what your parents might guess if you start talking LGBT rights), but don’t let things pass just because you think it would be awkward to confront the person about it or because it’s easier to cut contact under the assumption that they’ll never change anyway. If you know your friend/relative holds racist/sexist/homophobic/xenophobic/antisemitic/etc. beliefs, deal with it so marginalized people don’t have to. Educate other people. Educate yourself on the issues you aren’t familiar with.  
  • Remember that you have power as a constituent. This year’s election may be over, but your politicians will want your vote come re-election time, and the feedback they get from the people in their state/district can affect their decisions. Don’t assume that just because they’re Democrats they’ll do the right thing regardless - they may not, and if nothing else, voicing your support can increase the strength of their opposition. Don’t assume that just because they’re Republicans your call won’t make a difference - if they only ever hear from an echo chamber of supporters, they’ll never have any incentive to change. So:
  • Call your elected officials. Call in to support their good decisions or denounce their bad ones, and remember that phone calls are more effective than emails or web forms or petitions. You can find the phone number for your Senators here and your Representatives here. I called all three of my (Republican) Congresscritters yesterday to protest Trump’s hiring of Steve Bannon, and then I called all three (Democrats) from my home state/district to thank them for already denouncing his appointment - it took less than five minutes.
  • Here’s the basic script I used, for anyone who’s never done this before; just fill things in as necessary or update as necessary for whatever issue is at hand: “Hello, my name is [name]. I am a constituent, living in [city/county/district/general area]. I’m calling about [Trump’s appointment of Steve Bannon/insert future horrifying thing Trump and/or Republicans in Congress do]. I am calling to [express my support for Congressperson X’s opposition to Bannon’s appointment/request that Congressperson X publicly denounce this immediately]. As a [female/black/Hispanic/Jewish/Muslim/gay/etc. as applicable] American, I am concerned about this issue because [Steve Bannon is a white nationalist and I feel strongly that he should not be allowed in the White House]. Will Congressperson X [continue to condemn/condemn this appointment]?”
  • Figure out if you live in a sanctuary city. If you do, call in your support for continuing to resist deportation during a Trump presidency even if it means losing federal funding. If you live in a city that’s not a sanctuary city, call in your support for becoming a sanctuary city.
  • Donate. I listed some good organizations in a previous post, and there are other masterlists floating around as well. Consider setting up a recurring donation - this allows organizations to estimate their budgets and plan for the future, and it allows you to support them even when you aren’t actively thinking about it. Obviously everybody’s financial situation is different, but every bit counts. Why not match your monthly Netflix payment with a monthly $8 donation to Planned Parenthood or the ACLU?
  • Volunteer. Look at the same list as above, and then look beyond the big national organizations to what local groups are trying to deal with issues specific to your area. If you are a high-school/college student and can afford to work for free, look into the opportunities at these organizations in addition to whatever resume-building activity you’re planning for the summer. That way if your internship falls through, you can still do something more productive than sitting on your couch this summer.
  • Subscribe to a newspaper or otherwise pay for journalism. Don’t get me wrong, there was a lot of bad media coverage this year, and plenty of it did come from big newspapers like the New York Times etc. But those sources are also so much better than cable news or badly-curated Internet news sites which cater only to specific groups of thought. Independent journalism is important, but it needs to be funded so they don’t have to depend on clickbait. Local newspapers also need more love. This is a big country, and part of the problem in this election was that journalists based in big cities didn’t comprehend what was happening in the rest of the country - they underestimated Trump support in the heartland, and they didn’t pay enough attention to the fears of marginalized people living in those areas either.
  • Get involved in local politics. Attend city council meetings. Find your local activist groups. Go to your local meetings of Democrats (and/or Greens and/or whatever). Join a political club - Campus Democrats etc. Volunteer at your local party HQ, even if it just means stuffing envelopes. Work for a campaign for mayor, or for the state legislature, or for governor. Municipal and state elected officials have more power than you think.
  • Run for local office. Okay, obviously this one isn’t for everyone, but depending on what stage of your life you’re in…think about it. Change starts from the bottom, but it needs to work its way up from grassroots activism into actual policy. And most change starts taking root in policy put in place by individuals somewhere between the levels of “random citizen” and “President of the United States.” Remember, if you’re a pro-choice Democratic woman, you may be able to get training and/or funding from EMILY’s List.

Editing to add: Don’t just do these things. Get your friends and families to do them, too. Volunteering with a friend is more fun and will help keep you both accountable. If you buy a Washington Post subscription, buy a second one as a Thanksgiving gift for your Fox-News-watching relative. Etc.

washingtonpost.com
Justice Dept. will not bring civil rights charges against Ferguson police officer, meanwhile, DOJ finds Ferguson Police Department racist, so what gives? [TW: Racism, Ethnocentrism, White Privilege, Offensive Content]

The actions of Darren Wilson, who shot and killed Michael Brown, ‘do not constitute a prosecutable violation.’

The Justice Department on Wednesday released a report explaining why it will not pursue federal civil rights charges against Darren Wilson, the white police officer, who shot and killed Michael Brown, an unarmed black 18-year-old, in Ferguson, Mo., last August.

The department found that Wilson’s actions “do not constitute a prosecutable violation” and there “is no evidence upon which prosecutors can rely to disprove Wilson’s stated subjective belief that he feared for his safety.”

Read: DOJ report renews outrage in Ferguson

In a second report, the Justice Department accused the police department in Ferguson, Mo., of racial bias and routinely violating the constitutional rights of black citizens by stopping drivers without reasonable suspicion, making arrests without probable cause and using excessive force, officials said.

The broader report on police practices also included seven racist e-mails written by Ferguson police and municipal court officials. A November 2008 e-mail, for instance, stated that President Obama could not be president for very long because “what black man holds a steady job for four years.” Another e-mail described Obama as a chimpanzee. An e-mail from 2011 showed a photo of a bare chested group of dancing women apparently in Africa with the caption, “Michelle Obama’s High School Reunion.”

The Justice Department did not identify who wrote the e-mails and to whom they were sent.

Federal officials opened their civil rights investigation into the Ferguson police department after the uproar in the St. Louis suburb and across the country over the fatal shooting of Brown last year. A grand jury in St. Louis declined to indict Wilson in November.

Although federal officials will not bring civil rights charges against Wilson, they see their broad civil rights investigation into the troubled Ferguson police department as the way to force significant changes in Ferguson policing.

Outgoing Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. said last fall that the need for “wholesale change” in the Ferguson police department was “pretty clear.” In remarks two weeks ago, he said he was “confident that people will be satisfied with the results that we announce.”

Holder is expected to speak about the reports Wednesday afternoon.

In hundreds of interviews and in a broad review of more than 35,000 pages of Ferguson police records and other documents, Justice Department officials found that although African Americans make up 67 percent of the population in Ferguson, they accounted for 93 percent of all arrests between 2012 and 2014.

Benjamin Crump, the attorney for Brown’s family, said the report into police practices confirms “what Michael Brown’s family has believed all along, and that is that the tragic killing of their unarmed teenage son was part of a systemic pattern of policing of African American citizens in Ferguson.”

The findings come as Justice Department officials negotiate a settlement with the police department to change its practices. If they are unable to reach an agreement, the Justice Department could bring a lawsuit, as it has done against law enforcement agencies in other jurisdictions in recent years. A U.S. official said that Ferguson officials have been cooperating.

As part of its findings, the Justice Department concluded that African Americans accounted for 85 percent of all drivers stopped by Ferguson police officers and 90 percent of all citations issued.

[Archive: Federal civil rights charges unlikely against Ferguson police officer]

The review concludes that racial bias and a focus on generating revenue over public safety have a profound effect on Ferguson police and court practices and routinely violate the Constitution and federal law.

“We owe it, not just to law enforcement, but to Michael Brown,Tamir Rice and Eric Garner to figure out what’s really going on here so it can be addressed,” said Jeff Roorda, a former Missouri state representative and a spokesman for the St. Louis Police Officers Association, referring to others killed by police officers in Cleveland and New York. “Reaching conclusions from statistics about traffic stops I don’t think draws the whole picture.”

The Justice review also found a pattern or practice of Ferguson police using unreasonable force against citizens. In 88 percent of the cases in which the department used force, it was against African Americans.

In Ferguson court cases, African Americans are 68 percent less likely than others to have their cases dismissed by a municipal judge, according to the Justice review. In 2013, African Americans accounted for 92 percent of cases in which an arrest warrant was issued.

Justice investigators also reviewed types of arrests and the treatment of detainees in the city jail by Ferguson police officers. They found that from April to September 2014, 95 percent of people held longer than two days were black. The police department also overwhelmingly charges African Americans with certain petty offenses, the investigation concluded.

For example, from 2011 to 2013, African Americans accounted for 95 percent of all “manner of walking in roadway” charges, 94 percent of all “failure to comply” charges and 92 percent of all “peace disturbance” charges, the review found.

The shooting of Brown on a Ferguson street on Aug. 9 set off days of often violent clashes between demonstrators and police in the streets of Ferguson.

Elected officials, protest organizers and community leaders renewed calls Tuesday for Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson to resign — some adding that the department should be disbanded — and said the Justice Department probe should have gone further by investigating other municipal police forces in the area.

“I would speculate that the same pattern and practices of Ferguson exist in every other department in St. Louis County,” said Adolphus Pruitt, the president of the St. Louis NAACP, which has filed racial discrimination complaints against county police.

He added, “It’s time for the Ferguson police department to disappear.”

Justice Department investigators spent about 100 days in Ferguson, observing police and court practices, including four sessions of the Ferguson Municipal Court. They conducted an analysis of police data on stops, searches and arrests, as well as data collected by the court, and met with neighborhood associations and advocacy groups. The investigators also interviewed city, police and court officials, including the Ferguson police chief and his command staff.

In the past five years, the Justice Department’s civil rights division has opened more than 20 investigations of police departments, more than twice as many as were opened in the previous five.

The department has entered into 15 agreements with law enforcement agencies, including consent decrees with nine of them, including the New Orleans and Albuquerque police departments.

Kimberly Kindy, Sarah Larimer and Wesley Lowery contributed to this report.

Read more:

DOJ report renews outrage in Ferguson

In Ferguson, three minutes — and two lives forever changed

Even before Michael Brown’s slaying in Ferguson, racial questions hung over police

Ferguson violence broke the mold in three ways — one of which is just unfolding now

Source: Sari Horwitz for The Washington Post

anonymous asked:

Ferguson is over 60% black, the police chief & mayor are white, nobody on the school board is black, & only 1 city council member is black. But as committeewoman Bynes told NPR yesterday, turnout for Ferguson's elections is overwhelmingly white, even with Afr-Amer leaders like Bynes trying to improve it. Under Missouri law municipal officials get recalled with signatures of 25% of registered voters. Should be doable now. Nobody's doing it. How do we get people to participate in their own govt?

from 1934 to 1962, the federal government backed $120 billion of home loans. because of an appraisal system that deemed integrated communities financial risks, less than 2% of those loans went to minorities 

and when you consider that home ownership has long been the prerequisite for the average american to acquire wealth and the federal governments appraisal system deemed black communities “financial risks” white americans have 22 times more wealth than black americans. 

this among other things means the city’s population has shifted from almost exclusively white to one that is predominately black, while the city leadership and police force has remained mostly white

ultimately police do what the rest of society wants them to do, what our society has been set up to do since its incarnation, americans chose to fill prisons with low-level black and latin@ drug offenders who live in these areas while paying less attention to white users of illegal drugs

this is amplified in missouri because of the way exclusionary zoning and discrimination by realtors in predominately white neighborhoods but these racial dynamics are very common elsewhere in america

what i just explained to you is systematic oppression and anti blackness, it affects every single choice and consequence in a person’s life, oppressed people want to get involved in the government, they want to make a change but they can’t even protest the death of a teenager in their community without getting answered with tear gas and semi automatic weapons, “strict” (pro white) voting laws and the constant dehumanization of black americans contribute to the lack of participation in government, people do want to be involved but the system is set up in a way that makes it almost impossible. 

Carlos and his “team” are a group of twentysomethings who were road-tripping coast-to-coast when their van broke down in Night Vale. While getting it fixed, one of them introduced the group as “a team of scientists”, and the next thing they knew some municipal official was ushering them to “their lab” and calling a press conference so they could “explain their research.”

They still have no idea how they’re getting away with this, but hey, free housing – with the pizza place right next door!