mulberry-paper

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Artist:

Lisa Nilsson

“Canis Lupus Familiaris”

Mulberry Paper

2012

“This piece represents a midsagittal section of the head of a dog, a greyhound. It is life-size.”



“Angelico”

Mulberry Paper

19" x 22" x 1.5" Inches

2012

“This piece represents a midsagittal section (the one that passes through the center of the body dividing it into a left half and a right half) of the head of an angel. It is "life-size”. The work was inspired Fra Angelico’s Annunciatory Angel.

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Marsha Cottrell

Impossible Night, 2011; iron oxide on mulberry paper; 24 ½" x 38 ½"

Under the Illuminating Hydrogen, 2012; iron oxide on mulberry paper; 62" x 105"

Hitherto Unknown Lights, 2011; iron oxide on mulberry paper; 24 ½" x 38 ½"

Untitled, 2011; iron oxide on mulberry paper; 8 ½" x 11"

Polar Sun, 2012; iron oxide on mulberry paper; 52 3/8" x 80"

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Artist:

Lisa Nilsson

“Canis Lupus Familiaris”

Mulberry Paper

2012


“This piece represents a midsagittal section of the head of a dog, a greyhound. It is life-size.”
Part of the “Tissue Series.” Anatomical Cross-Sections in Paper

These pieces are made of Japanese mulberry paper and the gilded edges of old books. They are constructed by a technique of rolling and shaping narrow strips of paper called quilling or paper filigree. Quilling was first practiced by Renaissance nuns and monks who are said to have made artistic use of the gilded edges of worn out bibles, and later by 18th century ladies who made artistic use of lots of free time. I find quilling exquisitely satisfying for rendering the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross section.“

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Anatomical Cross-Sections Made with Quilled Paper by Lisa Nilsson

Lisa Nilsson constructs anatomical cross sections of the human body using rolled pieces of Japanese mulberry paper, a technique known as quilling or paper filigree. Each piece takes several weeks to assemble and begins with an actual photograph of a lateral or mid-sagittal cross section to which she begins pinning small rolls of paper. Depending on its function she rolls the paper on almost anything small and cylindrical including pins, needles, dowels, and drill bits. Lastly she even builds the wooden boxes containing the cross-sections by hand.

(Source)

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 New Ocean Reefs Comprised of Rolled Paper by Amy Genser

For artist Amy Genser, paper is pigment. The Connecticut-based artist cuts, rolls, and arranges countless tubes of mulberry paper mounted to Masonite boards to produce vibrant reef-like canvases. The tightly rolled papers perfectly mimc the forms of sea coral that appears to grow organically in every direction across (and on the sides of) each canvas. Since we last explored her work several years ago Genser was commissioned to create a massive 150 ft. mural for the Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children and has exhibited all across the US and Europe with Elisa Contemporary Art and Galerie NUMMER40. You can see more of her recent work in her portfolio.

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“Lotus Flowers”   29.5" x 41.5"  Pen & Ink on Watercolor Paper, Tea-dyed Mulberry paper

Started this drawing early February of this year. Because of life events and other projects that came my way - I finally finished it a couple of weeks ago. I think it’s my favorite so far. I love putting my son into these little worlds I’ve created for him… places where it’s peaceful and quiet…. where he’s protected… with Frank the fictitious, guardian rabbit.

Now the dilemma is - do I continue to work on the new drawing I just started or start on the Found Art canvases I sketched out a month ago?

Hmmm…..

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Here are more of my prints from class. I posted a few of my jean prints a while back but  thought I would put up a quick photo of the rest. The same jeans block print is used for both series with the line work done with trace monotype.

I also did some collage in the top ones with some Japanese paper (mulberry to be exact) that I glued on with some matte medium. A few different adhesives were suggested to me but had the matte medium at hand it worked out just fine.

By the way please ignore the mess on my table in the first picture. It is slowly being taken over by the materials of my next project.