2

Bernie Sanders: “You can’t praise Ali and disparage Muslims.”

Saturday, June 4, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders said that we, people mourning Muhammad Ali, must remember the legendary boxer’s faith.
During a press conference in Los Angeles said: “The reason that Ali struck a chord in the heart of so many Americans was not just his great boxing skill, it was his incredible courage. At a time when it was not popular to do so, Ali stood up and said, “I am opposed to the war in Vietnam and I’m not going to fight in that war.” And that incredibly courageous decision cost him three and a half years of his prime fighting life. But he chose to stand by his ideals, his views. What a hero. What a great man.”

#MuhammadAli    #BernieSanders

youtube

Chance the Rapper honors Muhammad Ali with musical tribute at 2016 ESPYs.

6

In 1967, Muhammad Ali was convicted of draft evasion for refusing to be inducted into the U.S. Army. His anti-war convictions stemming from his Muslim faith, and his status as a minister, he argued, exempted him from the draft; the courts disagreed. Ali was thereafter banned from boxing in the United States and stripped of his world heavyweight title by the World Boxing Association. Here, Ali is confronted by students who berate him for refusing the draft, and he responds. 

Yet despite public outrage and criticism, Ali’s objections found famous support. As Dr. Martin Luther King began to voice public opposition to the war in early 1967, he - in spite of his strained relationship with the Nation of Islam - explicitly echoed Ali: “Like Muhammad Ali puts it, we are all—black and brown and poor—victims of the same system of oppression.” 

Famed sportscaster Howard Cosell argued that “They took away his livelihood because he failed the test of political and social conformity… Nobody says a damn word about the professional football players who dodged the draft, but Muhammad was different. He was black, and he was boastful.”

One of the principal demands of the Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR), an organization that included Tommie Smith and John Carlos - whose Black Power salutes at the 1968 Olympic Games similarly shattered the illusory separation of politics, race, and sport - was the restoration of Ali’s heavyweight title. Harry Edwards, a key architect of the OPHR, proclaimed Alithe warrior saint in the revolt of the black athlete in America.

In 1971, the Supreme Court overturned Ali’s conviction and his denial by the lower courts of conscientious objector status. 

6.5.16 // Probably one of my favorite spreads so far. Loving these mildliners! 😍

“Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee.” - Muhammad Ali