ms.-foundation-for-women

I am a woman with thoughts and questions and shit to say. I say if I’m beautiful. I say if I’m strong. You will not determine my story — I will. I will speak and share and fuck and love and I will never apologize to the frightened millions who resent that they never had it in them to do it. I stand here and I am amazing, for you. Not because of you. I am not who I sleep with. I am not my weight. I am not my mother. I am myself. And I am all of you, and I thank you.
—  Amy Schumer, speaking at the Gloria Awards and Gala
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Former US Secretary of State and WOV Honoree Hillary Clinton speaks onstage at the Ms. Foundation for Women 2017 Gloria Awards Gala & After Party at Capitale on May 3, 2017 in New York City.

Amandla Stenberg

Amandla is a nonbinary African-American and Danish-American activist, actor and singer. Amandla is known for their acting prowess in films and performances such as, Colombiana (2011),  The Hunger Games (2012),  Sleepy Hollow (2013), As You Are (2016), and Beyoncé: Lemonade (2016).

Amandla Stenberg was born on October 23, 1998 in Los Angeles, California to parents Karen Brailsford and Tom Stenberg. Amandla’s name means power and strength in Zulu and Xhosa. At the age of four, Amandla made their public debut when they were featured in a Disney catalog and went on to star in numerous commercials for brands including McDonald’s and Walmart.

Amandla made a transition into film in 2010 when they began filming the action-thriller Colombiana (2011). Since then they have demonstrated an innate ability to capture the hearts of viewers worldwide. For their role as Rue in The Hunger Games (2012), Amandla was nominated for an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture. Amandla is also a talented musician and can play the violin, drums and guitar. In 2013 Amandla began performing violin and singing at venues across Los Angeles. Later the same year, they dropped their self titled EP.

Amandla Stenberg is a voice for young, Black, and LGBT millennials. Amandla is passionate about fair and diverse representation evidenced by their viral video “Don’t Cash Crop My Cornrows” which unpacked the baggage of cultural appropriation. Amandla was invited to the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Foundation to participate in the dedication ceremony where they paid tribute to the four young girls who were killed in the tragic Birmingham church bombing. Amandla is one of the most brilliant and outspoken actors of their generation. They take a multimedia approach to activism using film, social media, and music to bring more diversity in media, to build safer spaces, and to create more political agency for all people.

Dazed Magazine called Amandla Stenberg “one of the most incendiary voices of [their] generation.” Time Magazine named Amandla one of the 30 Most Influential Teens of 2015 and again in 2016. They have been interviewed by Solange Knowles for Teen Vogue and have been deemed an “icon of change” by ELLE UK. Oprah Winfrey recognized Amandla’s work and invited them to talk about authenticity in activism for Super Soul Sunday. Amandla is also the recipient of the BET Awards’ Young Stars Award. They have also been named Feminist Celebrity of the Year by the Ms. Foundation for Women. Amandla is a youth ambassador for No Kid Hungry and supports the Ubuntu Education Fund.

Emma Charlotte Duerre Watson (born 15 April 1990) is a British actress, model, and activist. Watson rose to prominence as Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter film series, appearing in all eight Harry Potter films from 2001 to 2011.

Watson has promoted education for girls, visiting Bangladesh and Zambia to do so.In July 2014, she was appointed as a UN Women Goodwill Ambassador. In September that year, an admittedly nervous Watson delivered an address at UN Headquarters in New York City to launch the UN Women campaign HeForShe, which calls for men to advocate for gender equality. In that speech she said she began questioning gender-based assumptions at age eight when she was called “bossy” (a trait she has attributed to her being a “perfectionist”) whilst boys were not, and at 14 when she was “sexualised by certain elements of the press”. Watson’s speech also called feminism “the belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities” and declared that the perception of “man-hating” is something that “has to stop”. Watson later said she received threats within 12 hours of making the speech, which left her “raging. … If they were trying to put me off [of doing this work], it did the opposite”. In 2015, Malala Yousafzai told Watson she decided to call herself a feminist after hearing Watson’s speech.

Also in September, Watson made her first country visit as a UN Women Goodwill Ambassador to Uruguay where she gave a speech highlighting the need for women’s political participation. In December, the Ms. Foundation for Women named Watson its Feminist Celebrity of 2014 following an online poll. Watson also gave a speech about gender equality in January 2015, at the World Economic Forum’s annual winter meeting. 

Former New York Times editor Jill Abramson noted Watson’s “gutsy, smart take on feminism” and called the effort to get men involved “refreshing”.[126]

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Why Your Kids Should Know the F-Word - Lisa’s part (thanks Julie Hermelin)

huffingtonpost.com
Why Bernie Sanders Is Best on Women's Issues
Many people believe that electing a woman president will help. I'm not so sure. Does breaking glass ceilings constitute a real political strategy -- that's capable of improving women's lives? And does voting one's gender really translate to voting one's interest?

’…the Senator from Vermont is outdoing the woman candidate on pro-woman policy. That shouldn’t come as a surprise. A recent survey by the Ms. Foundation for Women found that “Women do not lead single-issue lives… birth control and abortion is impacted by income level, racial and cultural bias, gender discrimination and immigrant status.”
Bernie has long-understood that women’s struggles can’t be compartmentalized into issue-silos. That’s why he’s long-eschewed counterfeit gestures of “gender diversity” – in favor of genuine social equality.’

I am a woman with thoughts and questions and shit to say. I say if I’m beautiful. I say if I’m strong. You will not determine my story — I will. I will speak and share and fuck and love and I will never apologize to the frightened millions who resent that they never had it in them to do it. I stand here and I am amazing, for you. Not because of you. I am not who I sleep with. I am not my weight. I am not my mother. I am myself. And I am all of you, and I thank you.
—  Amy Schumer. Gloria Awards and Gala, hosted by the Ms. Foundation for Women

Black History Month: Feminism and Inclusion

“As a woman of color, Black History Month holds a special significance for me. In particular, it allows me to reflect on my personal experiences and perspective, not just through a gender lens, but also that of an African-American.

Since beginning my tenure at the Ms. Foundation for Women, I have embarked on a comprehensive listening tour, traveling around the county to hear from community leaders of all backgrounds. From our grantees to grassroots leaders, these are the people on the ground propelling grassroots movements that affect thousands of lives everyday.

We continue to work to ensure that the lens of race and gender are not left out of our current social justice movements. Whether fighting for reproductive justice or environmental protections, the voices and experiences of all women must be included. Much like Harriet Tubman and the forgotten women of Selma, highlighted in Ava DuVernay’s recent film, feminism has a leading role in shaping progressive movements to be inclusive, while striving not to be ambivalent of race.

That is why I am calling on you to renew your commitment and dedication to building diverse and powerful movements for equality. Together we can bring more people to the table by expanding feminist narratives and acknowledging the intersection of issues within the larger movement for women’s empowerment. We must acknowledge, that to strengthen our movement, we have to address inequality as all women experience it.

Also know, that I am committed to upholding our obligation to continue building diverse, inclusive movements for equality, and we promise not to rest until we have justice for all.”

- Teresa C. Younger, President and CEO, The Ms. Foundation for Women

Read the full piece here