mrs. woolf

Classic Books List

“Why read the classics? A classic is a book that has never finished saying what it has to say.” These are a few recommendations, books everyone should read. Don’t let yourself be convinced they are good: read and decide for yourself!

(no particular order intended)

  • Don Quixote - Miguel de Cervantes
  • The Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
  • North and South - Elizabeth Gaskell
  • Hard Times - Charles Dickens
  • The Karamazov Brothers - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  • Wuthering Heights - Emily Brontë
  • The Waves - Virginia Woolf
  • Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen
  • Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
  • Sense and Sensibility - Jane Austen
  • Hamlet - William Shakespeare
  • Richard II - William Shakespeare
  • Little Women - Louisa Alcott
  • The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde
  • Emma - Jane Austen
  • Anna Karenina - Liev Tolstói
  • Jane Eyre - Charlotte Brontë
  • Romeo and Juliet - William Shakespeare
  • The Age of Innocence - Edith Wharton 
  • Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck
  • Lord of The Flies - William Golding
  • One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel García Márquez
  • Persuasion - Jane Austen
  • War and Peace - Liev Tolstói
  • Macbeth - William Shakespeare
  • The Tell-Tale Heart - Edgar Allan Poe
  • Dracula - Bram Stoker
  • The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar - Edgar Allan Poe
  • Frankenstein - Mary Shelley
  • The Metamorphosis - Franz Kafka 
  • Moby Dick - Herman Melville
  • Mrs. Dalloway - Virginia Woolf
  • King Lear - William Shakespeare
  • The Fountainhead - Ayn Rand
  • Nineteen Eighty-Four - George Orwell
  • Jean Barois - Roger Martin du Gard
  • Wives and Daughters - Elizabeth Gaskell
  • Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
  • To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
  • The Catcher in the Rye - J. D. Salinger
  • Crime and Punishment - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
2

11.11.16

Sorry if I’m being a little inactive lately… I think I wasn’t ready to work at the pace I had set, so now I have to adjust things for next week and I fell a little behind. I’m not disappointed, these things happen and I know I will catch up soon 💪🏻

Meanwhile, the only pics I’ve taken are of the books I’m reading 📖

5

London Bookstore Hop – Stop 2
Persephone Books

This was the stop on my bookstore hop that I was most thrilled for. Persephone Books is a publisher and bookseller of female authors whose works have gone out of print. Their iconic gray covers, careful curation, personalized recommendations, and character of resistance makes this bookstore a must-stop if you’re a book lover in London. 

I was there for one of their bestsellers: A Writer’s Diary by Virginia Woolf. Their recommendations that called it a fairy tale and a “love letter to Scotland” convinced me to also try out Lady Rose and Mrs. Memmary by Ruby Ferguson. With each book, you get a bookmark that matches the endpapers, which are different for every book they print. 

10

Also important for this list: The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner and “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman. 

Follow @monsieurbookshire and @alyssabooking for more classic literature shenanigans. Follow @adultbooklr for more general book shenanigans. Follow @thebooker because she’s great and does cool things like Read for Mental Health Week. 

Also, thanks to @obsessivegirlfan for our pretty new banner. We love you, mom!

There were flowers: delphiniums, sweet peas, bunches of lilac; and carnations, masses of carnations. There were roses; there were irises. Ah yes–so she breathed in the earthy garden sweet smell … turning her head from side to side among the irises and roses and nodding tufts of lilac with her eyes half closed, snuffing in, after the street uproar, the delicious scent, the exquisite coolness. And then, opening her eyes, how fresh like frilled linen clean from a laundry laid in wicker trays the roses looked; and dark and prim the red carnations, holding their heads up; and all the sweet peas spreading in their bowls, tinged violet, snow white, pale–as if it were the evening and girls in muslin frocks came out to pick sweet peas and roses after the superb summer’s day, with its almost blue-black sky, its delphiniums, its carnations, its arum lilies was over; and it was the moment between six and seven when every flower–roses, carnations, irises, lilac–glows; white, violet, red, deep orange; every flower seems to burn by itself, softly, purely in the misty beds; and how she loved the grey-white moths spinning in and out, over the cherry pie, over the evening primroses!
—  Mrs Dalloway, Virginia Woolf