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Disney Drops First Trailer for A Wrinkle in Time at D23 2017

A Wrinkle in Time, based on Madeleine L’Engle’s novel, group of children travel through time to find their missing dad, played by Chris Pine. Storm Reid portrays heroine Meg Reid with Oprah Winfrey as Mrs. Which, Reese Witherspoon as Mrs. Whatsit, Mindy Kaling as Mrs. Who.

The creepiest moment, that Stepford Wives-ish basketball scene. <chills>

ew.com
'A Wrinkle in Time' First Look: Oprah, Reese, Mindy, and More!
The clock ticks, time bends, space shifts, and Oprah is your planet-hopping tour guide through all of it. Consider that your intro-level education to A Wrinkle in Time, Disney’s upcoming fantasy ep…

EW has an exclusive first look at the film, due in theaters March 9, 2018. (Check out even more images in the full gallery here.)

“The clock ticks, time bends, space shifts, and Oprah is your planet-hopping tour guide through all of it. Consider thatyour intro-level education to A Wrinkle in Time, Disney’s upcoming fantasy epic about an ordinary teenager named Meg (newcomer Storm Reid) who’s whisked on a cosmic adventure to find her missing scientist father (Chris Pine) with the help of three chimerical celestial beings who help her “wrinkle” time and space: philosophizing Mrs. Who (Mindy Kaling), inquisitive Mrs. Whatsit (Reese Witherspoon), and wizened Mrs. Which (Oprah Winfrey).

Director Ava DuVernay, fresh off of heavy projects like the civil rights drama Selma and her criminal-justice exposé 13th, was drawn to dabble in uncharted sci-fi territory upon discovering author Madeline L’Engle’s novel as an adult. DuVernay hadn’t read the novel — “I went to school in Compton and it wasn’t on my reading list,” she jokes — but the director, for whom time and energy on any project is a precious investment to say something, was impressed with the progressive ideas that L’Engle buried in her beloved 1962 novel. “I saw so much beauty in it, but also so much meaning. She’s a very radical thinker and she embedded her sense of what society should and could be in this piece, and a lot of it I agree with,” says DuVernay. “And through that, the story of this girl saving the world and being out there in the universe slaying the darkness, it also says a lot about slaying our own dragons.”

Read the full piece and see the photos here

'A Wrinkle in Time' first look: Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon, Mindy Kaling, and more

The clock ticks, time bends, space shifts, and Oprah is your planet-hopping tour guide through all of it. Consider that your intro-level education to A Wrinkle in Time, Disney’s upcoming fantasy epic about an ordinary teenager named Meg (newcomer Storm Reid) who’s whisked on a cosmic adventure to find her missing scientist father (Chris Pine) with the help of three chimerical celestial beings who help her “wrinkle” time and space: philosophizing Mrs. Who (Mindy Kaling), inquisitive Mrs. Whatsit (Reese Witherspoon), and wizened Mrs. Which (Oprah Winfrey).

EW has an exclusive first look at the film, due in theaters March 9, 2018. (Check out even more images in the full gallery here.)

Director Ava DuVernay, fresh off of heavy projects like the civil rights drama Selma and her criminal-justice exposé 13th, was drawn to dabble in uncharted sci-fi territory upon discovering author Madeline L’Engle’s novel as an adult. DuVernay hadn’t read the novel — “I went to school in Compton and it wasn’t on my reading list,” she jokes — but the director, for whom time and energy on any project is a precious investment to say something, was impressed with the progressive ideas that L’Engle buried in her beloved 1962 novel. “I saw so much beauty in it, but also so much meaning. She’s a very radical thinker and she embedded her sense of what society should and could be in this piece, and a lot of it I agree with,” says DuVernay. “And through that, the story of this girl saving the world and being out there in the universe slaying the darkness, it also says a lot about slaying our own dragons.”

Two key elementsconvinced DuVernay that Wrinkle, with its script by Oscar winner Jennifer Lee (Frozen), was worth investigating when Disney proposed the idea. “The first image [I had in my head] was to place a brown girl in that role of Meg, a girl traveling to different planets and encountering beings and situations that I’d never seen a girl of color in,” she explains. “All of those scenes struck my fancy, and then it was also something that [Disney VP of production] Tendo Nagenda said to me, which I’ll never forget. One of the things that really made me want to read it was when he said, ‘Ava, imagine what you would do with the worlds.’ Worlds! ‘Planets no one’s ever seen or heard of,’ he said. There aren’t any other black women who have been invited to imagine what other planets in the universe might look and feel like. I was interested in that and in a heroine that looked like the girls I grew up with.”

DuVernay plucked 14-year-old Reid from thousands of hopefuls across the country to play teen protagonist Meg, who travels the cosmos with her younger brother, Charles Wallace (Deric McCabe), and unlocks her inner warrior along the way. “She’s got the sweetest, warmest heart, and all that I saw every day was just a further blossoming of the good that is Storm Reid,” the director gushes. “She’s appropriately named. She’s a force.” Gugu Mbatha-Raw and Chris Pine play Meg’s parents, two world-renowned physicists, the latter of whom disappears under mysterious circumstances. “Chris is the first full-on heart-throb type of actor that I’ve ever worked with,” DuVernay notes. “That’s how the world sees him. But I always just saw a damn good actor. I saw Z for Zachariah and Hell or High Water, and I just knew I wanted him because I saw, that dude’s got chops.”

To accompany Meg on her interplanetary journey, DuVernay recruited three world-class actresses to inhabit what are perhaps the best remembered parts of A Wrinkle in Time — the magical trio of eccentric guides, whom DuVernay describes as “three Mrs. Doubtfires.” The director saw an immediate casting opportunity to expand upon the literary archetype of three wise women and rise to her own personal challenge in pushing this film past what could be construed as traditional limits. “My whole process with this film was, what if? With these women, I wondered, could we make them women of different ages, body types, races? Could we bring in culture, bring in history in their costumes? And in the women themselves, could we just reflect a fuller breadth of femininity?”

First up was Mindy Kaling, who plays the enlightened Mrs. Who. “I wanted a black Mrs., a white Mrs., and a Mrs. that was not either, and Mindy was the first one that came to mind. I feel like we don’t talk about a lot of the other colors and cultures enough, and Mindy is so beautiful to me. Her character is one that, in her costumes and in working with Mindy, we wanted to bring in a remix of styles and cultures and customs from around the world. She was a real partner in that. She was working with two legends, but I think she’s a legend in the making in terms of what she does and being a fresh voice as a comedic actress.”

Reese Witherspoon plays Mrs. Whatsit, the youngest of the three celestials, “clocking in at a prepubescent 60 million,” laughs DuVernay. “I was looking for that innocence, that thing Reese plays so well, but also that great power and precision, and funny. The character has so much funny going on, you really need someone who’s proven and who’s done a bit of it all, and that’s Reese. It was so lucky that she was a fan of the book and wanted to come play with me.”

Guiding Who and Whatsit is the most legendary guru of all: Oprah Winfrey, who plays Mrs. Which, a powerful sage with a knack for materialization. “I mean, when you’re trying to cast the wisest woman in the world, what’s the question? You go and you call her and you’re glad that you have her number on speed dial,” DuVernay beams. “[The character] is so much of what she teaches and shared through her shows over the years, through her magazine and OWN, about owning your light and conquering darkness and how we have to power ourselves through this life in a certain way and look out for each other. She dropped into the character so well, but it’s also Oprah. When we see her in Henrietta Lacks, she’s not Oprah to me. When I saw her in The Butler, she became Gloria to me. But in this, because of the things that Mrs. Which says, her Oprah-ness is really helpful.”

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A Wrinkle in Time, the 1963 masterpiece children’s science fiction novel written by prolific Christian author, the late Madeleine L'Engle, has been adapted by phenom female director Ava DuVernay (Selma, 13th). DuVernay is the first black female director to helm a $100 million dollar Hollywood blockbuster.

A Wrinkle in Time took the teachings of C.S. Lewis (Mere Christianity, The Chronicles of Narnia) and turned them on a spin. Her more liberal teachings of Christianity didn’t bode well with more fundamental Christians who protested against the major themes of the brilliant novel.

In the novel, L’Engle discusses the battle of good vs. evil as the battle of light vs. darkness. They recognize the roles that children have in the future of our planet and how the cosmic beings of the light guide them to find the protectors to help the fight of prevailing darkness. The children find the Messianic figures that have been Earthlings in philosophers, not in gods. Jesus is with Budah as well as DaVinci, Shakespeare, Einstein, Bach, and Gandhi. Together they children join forces with them to fight The Dark Thing.

These themes radically influenced authors and filmmakers such as George Lucas in his larger-than-life creation, Star Wars, and Philip K. Dick in Do Androids Sleep of Electric Sheep or better known as Blade Runner mainstreamed by Ridley Scott. 

The concept of the Tesseract is important in the themes of the novel.  The tesseract is the four-dimensional analog of the cube. In A Wrinkle in Time, we learn the Megan Murry has to travel to the fifth dimension to save her scientist father who is being kept in the darkness. The five dimensions are: linear (first), square (second), cube (third), Einstein’s concept of time (fourth), and tesseract (fifth). Her concepts of time and space, entering the wormhole resembles that of a twin paradox.  A wormhole is a theoretical passage through space-time that could create shortcuts for long journeys across the universe. Wormholes are predicted by the theory of general relativity. Wormholes bring with them the dangers of sudden collapse, high radiation and dangerous contact with exotic matter. 

The twin paradox is a thought experiment in special relativity involving identical twins, one of whom makes a journey into space in a high-speed rocket and returns home to find that the twin who remained on Earth has aged more, thus the returning twin is now the younger twin of the two.

Everything, in theory, is a direct consequence of relativity and that’s the magic of A Wrinkle in Time. The idea that in every social circle we are presented with the superiority and inferiority complexes that shape and mold the perception of power in this universe. In every group, there are those that challenge the minority groups and the status quo, and it is up to us to be a part of the resistance against peer-pressured superiority. Social class is nothing more than a feudalistic attempt to hold power over a group and dominate their every way of life. 

In the novel, we also explore that humans cannot be whole without the juxtaposition of pragmatism and romanticism (rationality and creativity). When the Ws challenge Meg and her friends to come up with a list of fighters, she sees life in a rational direction that there’s no counterpoint to logic. She is in her comfort zone and life doesn’t always work in predictability. We need to find the happy medium in all of us as wisely manifested in the Happy Medium, an amalgamation as told by Mrs. Murry.

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Our first look at Ava DuVernay’s ‘A Wrinkle in Time’

Disney’s upcoming fantasy epic is about an ordinary teenager named Meg (newcomer Storm Reid) who’s whisked away on a cosmic adventure to find her missing scientist father Mr. Murry (Chris Pine) with the help of three chimerical celestial beings who help her “wrinkle” time and space: philosophising Mrs. Who (Mindy Kaling), inquisitive Mrs. Whatsit (Reese Witherspoon), and wizened Mrs. Which (Oprah Winfrey).

The film adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s book is written by Frozen’s Jennifer Lee and also stars Gugu Mbatha Raw as Meg’s mother Kate Murry. 

Can’t wait to see a trailer! The film hits theatres March 9, 2018.

cute things harold finch has done
  • tried to pronounce discombobulated while high on ecstasy and just blubbered instead
  • really earnestly googled “canine depression” when bear was feeling under the weather
  • while we’re talking about bear, has several times referred to “discussions” he has had with bear about things, like, he really earnestly talks to this dog… i love him
  • flew a tiny plane through a massive storm and landed it in a puddle because john reese was in danger
  • called carter to give his condolences when beacher died (he was the only one who bothered)
  • phoned bear to tell him he’s a good dog when bear missed him too much to eat
  • attempted to read a book while doing push ups
  • didn’t tell john about an upsetting case on his birthday because he didn’t want him to be sad
  • bought john books and a cushion after he got shot to cheer him up and emphatically urged him to USE THE CUSHION
  • his to go to rebellious thing to do while high on drugs was hacking the pentagon
  • patiently spent an entire day teaching the machine to play chess because she asked him to
  • bought root bunny slippers and a lava lamp so she’s cosy
  • insisted on taking john’s suit measures by himself while rambling at him about what an ideal suit should be tailored like (IT NEEDS TO SHIVER ON THE SHOE, MR. REESE)
  • fistbumped john before their attempted robbery
  • got super excited and nerdy about being able to help shaw blow things up with his chemistry knowledge
  • turned on the taxi meter to annoy carter when he ferried her around in one
  • held an entire really passionate earnest speech about the wonders of pi to a completely disinterested high school class
  • got really excited when he rode on the back of a moped and went “that was… exhilarating” in his nerd voice
  • i could go on
  • i won’t this is long and embarrassing enough but i could