ULTIMATE "OH FUCK I JUST GOT MY FIRST APARTMENT AND ALL I HAVE IS ONE CHANGE OF CLOTHES AND A THIRD SOCK" CHECKLIST

CLEANING

  • Dish soap
  • Laundry detergent
  • All-purpose cleaner
  • Hand soap
  • Broom
  • Mop
  • Wash cloths / rags
  • Vacuum
  • Dustpan
  • Lint roller
  • Sponges

KITCHENWARE

  • Plates
  • Bowls
  • Spoons
  • Forks
  • Knives
  • Glasses
  • Mugs
  • Tongs
  • Spatula
  • Plastic wrap
  • Ziplock baggies
  • Garbage bags
  • Paper towel
  • Tupperware
  • Ice tray
  • Oven mitts
  • Potato peeler
  • Mixing bowls
  • Frying pan
  • Pot
  • Baking sheet
  • Whisk
  • Stirring spoons / ladels
  • Tea infuser ball
  • Measuring cups
  • Strainer
  • Cutting board
  • Coffee maker
  • Kettle
  • Toaster
  • Magnets
  • Dry erase markers
  • Sticky notes
  • Microwave
  • Wire sponge
  • Trash bin
  • Recycling bin
  • Rubber gloves
  • Silverware organizer
  • Measuring spoons
  • Aluminum foil
  • Wax paper
  • Can opener
  • Bottle opener
  • Containers for salt, sugar, flour, etc.

LIVINGROOM

  • Sofa
  • Rocking chair (you know you want one)
  • Loveseat
  • Coasters
  • Blankets
  • Throw pillows
  • Coffee table
  • Book shelves
  • TV
  • TV stand
  • Floor lamp
  • End table
  • Stereo system / radio

BEDROOM

  • Mattress
  • Box spring
  • Bedframe
  • Linens
  • Sheets
  • Comforter
  • Hangers
  • Laundry hamper
  • Trash bin
  • Curtains
  • Pillows
  • Pillow cases
  • Night table
  • Alarm clock
  • Lamp
  • Dresser
  • Coat rack
  • Desk / vanity
  • Comfy chairs

DININGROOM

  • Dining table
  • Minimum of 2 chairs
  • Coasters
  • Placemat
  • Tablecloth
  • Tea lights /candles and candle holders

BATHROOM

  • Face clothes
  • Towel
  • Soap bar
  • Body wash
  • Shampoo
  • Conditioner
  • Tissues
  • Toilet paper
  • Trash bin
  • Plunger
  • Toilet cleaner
  • Cold, flu, pain, and allergy meds
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Antibacterial ointment
  • First-Aid kit
  • Tweezers
  • Nail clippers
  • Band-aids
  • Shower rod
  • Shower curtain
  • Toothbrush
  • Toothpaste
  • Floss
  • Period products
  • Bathmat
  • Air freshener
  • Trash bin
  • Towel rod
  • Towels

MISCELLANEOUS

  • Elastic bands
  • Stapler
  • Stables
  • Paper clips
  • Needles and thread
  • AA / AAA batteries
  • Light bulbs
  • Extension cords
  • Scotch tape
  • Duct tape
  • Shovel
  • Rake (if you have a yard)
  • Stain remover
  • Jar of courters for laundry mat
  • Screw drivers
  • Hammer
  • Nails
  • Sticky tack
  • Screws
  • Box cutter / X-acto
  • Pliers
  • Wrench
  • Pens
  • Paper
  • Pencils
  • Pencil sharpener
  • Eraser
  • Welcome matt
  • Shoe rack
  • Coat rack
  • Flashlight
  • Flashlight batteries
  • Watch batteries
  • Rechargeable batteries and charger
  • Safe place to discard dead batteries
  • Candles
  • Matches
  • Lighter
  • Mini travel fans
  • Real fans
  • Emergency Survival kit
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Landline phone
  • Window air conditioner
  • Carbon monoxide alarm
  • Fire alarm

FOOD STUFF

  • Mustard
  • Ketchup
  • Mayo
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Baking soda
  • Flour
  • Eggs
  • Milk
  • Bread
  • Olive oil
  • Tea
  • Jam
  • Peanut-butter
  • Coffee grounds
  • Cereal
  • Rice
  • Pasta
  • Vegetable soup
  • Tomato sauce
  • Frozen vegetables
  • Crackers
  • Chickpeas / lentils
  • Apples
  • Oranges
  • Granola bars
  • Juice
  • Hot chocolate mix
  • Frozen meats

And since people are having a hard time figuring this out for themselves, let me just say: every single item on this list is OPTIONAL, just look for what you need personally and let others do the same.

vine

It’s my last night living in college dorms. So I wanted to make a video showing how I felt living here.

things to remember when you move out

•always have bottled water in your house/apartment
•pay your bills on time
•wash your dishes everyday
•don’t tell anyone you don’t trust you live alone
•call your mom and tell her you love her
•make sure you have extra toilet paper
•remember to close the curtains when changing
•lock all the windows and doors at night/before leaving the house
•double check that the stove is off
•don’t leave lights on too much
•use real plates instead of throwaways
•have flashlights in every room
•fruits and veggies are important
•night lights aren’t just for babies and kids
•electric and water bill are more important than cable
•don’t eat out too much
•do your laundry
•it’s okay to ask for help
•own at least two recipe books
•never lock yourself out
•but don’t hide a spare under a mat/plant
•don’t open the door without knowing who it is
•mop
•wash your bed spread a lot
•make sure you always have food in the fridge
•if you feel unsafe call someone
•candy/snacks are not meals

LAST RESORT: What to pack if you're going to be on your own

 Some babies are in not-so-great situations. Momma doesn’t exactly condone running away, but if you are going to, at least be properly prepared!

  • Water bottles
  • Good boots
  • Phone
  • FIRST AID KIT
  • High-end garbage bags
  • Ear plugs
  • Multipurpose knife
  • Weatherproof backpack
  • Toothbrush
  • Baking powder (for brushing teeth, cleaning, and deodorizing your shoes.)
  • Multivitamins
  • Map
  • A light. A flashlight works, but a head-mounted one would be perfect.
  • Sleeping bag + compression sack
  • Layers of clothing made out of wool and synthetic materials. Cotton takes forever to dry.
  • UNDERWEAR. Preferably fast-drying.
  • Four pairs of good wool or synthetic socks
  • Set of dark clothes
  • Set of nice clothes
  • Small sewing kit
  • large ziploc bags
  • Water purification. Either a filter straw or the tablets.
  • A good TRAVEL towel
  • METAL cup or bowl
  • Hat with a brim to keep the sun away
  • Rain poncho
  • Tarp
Moving Out and Getting an Apartment, Part 2: Finding the Damn Apartment

Don’t even bother reading this post unless you’ve read the first one on preparing to move out. This is for those brave folks who faced your bank account and came out victorious. The rest of you need to step up your game or get the fuck out.

Step 1. Budget that Shit

Before you can do anything with an apartment, you need to figure out what you can afford. If you’re piss-poor, you’re going to be looking at shitty places. But at least you’ll know and can start with the shitty places instead of raising that bar too high and then having to rip out your heart when you can’t afford them. If you’re going to have a roommate, make sure to make a budget together, that way you know ahead of time if they’re a total deadbeat who will abandon you with most of the rent. Finding a good roommate is this whole other issue that I won’t even go into right now.

What you need to do is make a list of all your monthly costs, not even the stuff you’re going to start paying, but whatever you pay for right now. Gas, car insurance, health insurance (for the truly wealthy and privileged), phone bills, and whatever other shit you spend your money on. You might want to adjust your spending and stop buying so much crap. Remember, you need to pack and move that crap later. You’re not going to be so excited about your extensive Yu-Gi-Oh collection when that time comes. Now add in your estimated utilities. You can fucking google that on your own, because it’s going to be different for wherever you want to live. Absolutely do this if you plan on moving to a different town or state. If you plan on moving to Chicago, LA, or New York, I hope you’re a goddamned heiress otherwise you’re going to be living in a shelter three months from now.

I think this part is a little ridiculous, but this is how property managers are going to figure out whether or not you’re as rich as you say you are: divide your total monthly income by three. Hey, look at that, it’s my good friend Math again. Funny how he keeps showing up. Make sure the number of your expenses is less than the other 2/3rds, if it is, you can continue. If it’s not, get the fuck out of here.

Okay, now take another hundred or three out of that for play money or emergencies or whatever. This final low low number is what you can afford to spend on rent. If you see this number and think “I’m fucked,” you probably are and you should just stay in your parent’s basement for another couple of years.

Step 2. Stay Within the Budget

I’m so fucking annoyed that I have to put this step in here at all for all you shitheads who look at all these fancy-ass places and get turned down. You just figured out your MAXIMUM rent. Don’t go above that.

Go somewhere like apartments.com and before you do anything else, put your maximum into the maximum rent range. This shouldn’t be that hard. I’m sure even you can manage it.

Step 3. Know What You Want

Okay, once you know all your limitations, you can pretend you’re the boss and focus on what you want. But here’s the shitty part: you’re probably going to have to compromise. Yeah, it’s nice to have a washer/dryer set in the apartment (especially if it’s included already, but that’s a damn fantasy), but you might need to settle for a laundromat nearby. If you’re rooming with someone, ask yourself, is this selfish bitch going to hog the bathroom for two hours every morning when you need to get ready? If so, maybe try to find somewhere with two bathrooms. Also, be prepared to fight over the bigger bedroom. Go in prepared for battle (and maybe be willing to pay a tiny bit over half if you get the bigger one, unless you’re a complete asshole). If you absolutely need your pet with you, narrow your search to pet-friendly places BEFORE you get kicked out of somewhere because your little pomeranian barks too much and gives you away. If you own a great dane or anything larger than a fucking breadbox, I am so so sorry. This search is going to be hell for you.

Okay. Go ahead and put all of that shit into an apartment search engine. Apartments.com is probably the least sketchy, but hey, maybe you’re looking for a place to house your meth lab and sketchy works for you. I don’t ask questions.

Step 4. Do Some Fucking Research

You’re going to live in this place. You’re going to be so poor you’re going to spend most of your time in this apartment, so you better fucking love it. Look at all the floor plans once you find places in your price range. Actually think about what’s on it. Will your oven and fridge open into each other? Do you need a hall closet to split up your enormous hoarder-like shoe collection? How big are the bedrooms? Is your bathroom basically one of those horrific bathroom stalls in stores where you have to stand on the toilet just to close the door? You’re not going to put up with that kind of shit every goddamned day for the next year.

Look at some maps of the area. Is the nearest grocery store two towns away? Is it near your work, or are you going to have to get up an extra hour earlier to avoid rush hour? Do yourself a favor and make a custom google map. Yeah, google has everything. It’s going to save your life someday. Probably in the form of some sentient, unforgiving android, but for today, we’ll stick to maps. Put all your potential apartments on there and put your work on there and whatever other terrible places you visit daily. If you have a roommate, share the map so they can see how selfish you’ve been by making sure your commute is short and theirs is two hours.

You should also check out the maps on crimereports.com so you know if you’re living next door to a sex offender or something. This is good for the meth lab owners, too, because you don’t want to move in next to someone who got caught for that kind of shit. You don’t need to deal with that kind of competition.

If you’re really dedicated, and I hope to God you are, you can google the hell out of that shit. Find out everything you can about this apartment you’ve found. Wikisearch the town, read reviews on yelp, figure out which pizza places deliver past midnight. 

Step 5. Narrow Down Your Choices

Focus on your top 10. Then your top 5. Then your top 3. Don’t go any farther than that (and don’t get rid of the research for the other 7 just yet). Create crazy complicated rating systems. Make an excel sheet or start putting stuff on your wall and connecting them with strings. Go full-on serial killer. Dedicate yourself.

Step 6. Visit

Don’t try to move in somewhere you’ve never even fucking seen. If you do, you deserve all the secret horrors that await you. Call or email the managers and try to pick a day to visit when they’re available. You don’t want to show up somewhere and find out they just sold their last place or they’re closed or something.

When you do visit, take pictures. Take enough pictures that you could use them to potentially break into the place in the future. But don’t actually do that unless you’re prepared to go to jail for it. But do take pictures, even of things you don’t think are important. Take pictures of the ceiling so you know if there’s any overhead light to illuminate all your past mistakes at 3 AM when you’re sitting on the kitchen floor eating a tube of cookie dough. You should also make note of how big the room is so you know if you can even fit what little you own. The same goes for the hallways or stairs or whatever exists outside the apartment on the way from your car. Could you get your mattress through all that shit?

You should ask millions of questions, by the way. I don’t care if you hate talking to people, you need to get over that and talk to this person. Apartments.com and My First Apartment both have lists of questions to ask. Or just google it like you do everything else. 

Step 7. Get the Goddamn Apartment

When you figure out what you want and have gone through all the previous steps, you can work on getting the apartment. Call the leasing office and let them know what you want. When you actually show up, pretend you’re showing up for a fucking job interview. Let them know that you’re the best goddamn tenant they could hope for and you’re the picture of perfection, even though we both know you’re a total fuckup. Don’t let the landlord know that yet. If you ace this secret interview, the office will ask for a security deposit. Better have that money ready! This is one of those rare times in your life that someone might require a physical check. We have a post on that if you’re one of those ignorant fucks who can’t write a check. Then they’re going to run a credit check and you better know that shit ahead of time and be prepared to defend yourself if necessary. After a few days, the manager will give you a call with either great news or to laugh at you because you done fucked up. This is either the end of your search or the beginning of a new one. Either way, we’re done here.

This is by no means a complete guide, so if you have any specific questions, please let us know and I’ll do my best to answer them for you.

Moving out master post

If you have any other links tell me and I’ll update the list!

General

Things to know before moving (great list)
Budgeting calculators
Cost of living calculator (limited city selection)
Simple first look at how much it will cost to move (really great)
First apartment essentials checklist
How much will everything on the first apartment essentials cost new? 
Stuff nobody tells you about getting an apartment
20 tips for moving out 
How to impress your (potential) landlord

Cost of living comparisons

Cost of living comparison
How far will my salary go in another city (us only)  [1]  [2] 

How to find an apartment

How to find your first apartment
Beginners Guide to Online Apartment Searching
How to find an apartment in a new city
Tips for long-distance apartment searching

The move itself

33 tips on the move itself  
How to move long distances with plants

Help me move out of an abusive home

so guys, i need to move out of my very abusive home, after being stuck with a broken piece of subfloor and it leaving big bruises and splinters I am sick of being here, and I am no longer going to subject myself to this.

I’ve been abused all my life, my grandma abused me, my dad did, and my mom verbally abused me.

I am so tired of being hit, and belittled, and put in danger.

I will work my ass off for every penny I get, but I also am in no position to turn down donations.

I can do art for you, I can sew fursuit items for you, and I can even give you private drawing lessons.

I am open for commissions of all kind, SFW, NSFW, comics, fusion concepts, concept art, ANYTHING YOU NAME IT

I have a goal of $5,000.

$2,000 of it is going to a car so I can get to and from school, and the other 3k is going towards security payment on an apartment, and emergency money for food and rent.


Support me on patreon https://www.patreon.com/DannyStiletto

Commission me for art, fursuits, or writing

http://gemfusionclub.tumblr.com/ <– a lot of my steven universe related art is there

if you want to commission me i can show you more pictures.

Please guys, spread this everywhere you can, i can’t live here anymore.

Moving Out and Getting an Apartment, Part 4: Packing and Moving All Your Shit

Recently, we received an ask to cover how to best pack for a move and since I’ve covered how to know if you can move out, how to find an apartment, and the kinds of questions you should ask when looking at an apartment, this seemed like a nice addition to the series. So here we go, part 4!

Keep reading

maps, tape, and missing socks: a moving playlist

for when it’s time to pack up, move out, spread your wings, and find a new place to land (hopefully on your feet and with all your things)

1. here i go again on my own - whitesnake // 2. it’s time - imagine dragons // 3. born to run - bruce springsteen // 4. the kids aren’t alright - the offspring // 5. freebird - lynyrd skynyrd // 6. chicago - sufjan stevens // 7. like a rolling stone - bob dylan // 8. free fallin’ - tom petty & the heartbreakers // 9. why georgia - john mayer // 10. nothing left to lose - mat kearney // 11. going to california  - led zeppelin  // 12. carry on wayward son - kansas // 13. boston - augustana // 14. carry on - fun. // 15. good riddance (time of your life) - green day // 16. home - phillip phillips 

(listen)

(album cover credit)

Moving Out?

I definitely recommend for anyone moving away from their parents for the first time–whether it be moving to a school campus, or into a new apartment with a friend–make a small investment.

Thing is, when your sick in your new adult life, you aren’t going to have mum and dad to take care of you. The first time I really got sick away from my parents was awful. I had a serious stomach flu. And I wasn’t prepared. I ended up having to go shopping for things while I was still sick, because I didn’t even have friends around at the time to go out for me.

So what I recommend is making sure you have some things to help your recovery long before your ever sick. If you like, stick it in an “All That Ails Me” box. My personal must haves are as follows:

  • Some sort of electrolyte source; personally I go for Gatorade or Powerade, but if you prefer something healthier, coconut water is supposedly quite a good source, or you can make your own ‘gatorade’ with some fruit juice diluted in water and a pinch of salt.
  • Broth and broth based soups; if you can’t keep solid food down, broth is a pretty good way to get some nutrition until you can. Broth based soups are also good as you start to transition back into a normal diet.
  • BRAT foods are recommended by most healthcare professionals; they’re easy on the digestive system: Bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast. You can usually keep rice and applesauce on hand and all times. Crackers are a good replacement for toast in my opinion.
  • Anything really with ginger (such as gingerale, or ginger tea) to help settle an upset stomach (make sure to let the gingerale flatten first if you go that route though)
  • Hot water bottle, for aches and pains
  • Make sure you have any medications that help with things like diarrhea or vomiting; tylenol, imodium, etc.
  • Tea; personally I have the Cold Surivival Kit from David’s Tea, which I love and it covers your bases (stomach ache, sniffles, sore throat), and I always try to have medicated lemon tea on hand since it puts me right to sleep and relieves everything from cough to runny nose. But any tea in general is good since they’re easy to get down, provide some nutrition, and the heat can help relieve various aches, pains, and other issues. 
  • Puke bucket; just keep one in your closet for such an occasion. It’s better than hanging over the public dorm toilets or running to the bathroom in your apartment
  • Favourite movie, stuffed animal, music, etc; I mean, you’ll probably have this anyway, and it won’t stop you from puking your guts out, but it may make you feel a little bit better when your sick and have no one to take care of you. 

These are my main suggestions, and probably the most important things, but make sure you take account of what your parents usually do to take care of you when you’re sick and help you feel better, and go out and buy that stuff so you have it on hand and are prepared if you ever get ill yourself. The things needed isn’t going to be exactly the same for everyone, since some people have little things that there parents did differently to care for them, or have other foods that they find do the same thing. Point is, make sure you have it on hand

19 Things You’ll Do When You Move Out Of Your Parents’ House
  1. Go grocery shopping for the first time and buy a gallon of chocolate chip cookie dough ice cream and five packs of cookies because you can.
  2. Plaster pictures of everyone in your life all over your walls. Like, frame everything.
  3. Get excited about weird things like buying a new broom.
  4. Start subconsciously browsing through home decor websites in your spare time.
  5. Stay up as late as you want without anybody checking up on you.
  6. Buy sequin pillows. Duh.
  7. Eat leftover pizza for breakfast.
  8. Walk around without any pants on because you can.
  9. Call your parents every other day because you’ll miss their weird breakfast banter
  10. Make your parents send you daily updates about your dog. NON STOP PICS PLZ.
  11. Have sleepovers with your friends all. the. time.
  12. Start missing home-cooked meals.
  13. Buy a cookbook so you can make home-cooked meals.
  14. Leave the kitchen in tears after trying to make said home-cooked meals.
  15. Order takeout from the chinese restaurant down the street.
  16. NETFLIX. SO MUCH NETFLIX.
  17. Get a cat. Because you need one. Obviously.
  18. Get another cat because logically your cat needs a feline companion.
  19. Become immersed in the new sense of independence that comes with moving out of your parents’ house and start doing things you’ve never done before - live yo’ life, guuurl!