Overrated First Year Advice

Disclaimer: I don’t mean to discredit the posts that have these suggestions in them… However, I know that for people going into first year university, it can be stressful seeing pages and pages of “must-dos” and feeling like you have to do them all. As always, different things work for different people! 

Talking to Profs 

  1. Getting to know profs personally. If you don’t feel comfortable talking to profs personally, don’t feel like you have to. In upper years, it can be really valuable to know profs for recommendations, etc. but in first year this is less important. Profs also don’t usually mark your work in first year, so you don’t need to suck up to them for good grades. 
  2. Going to office hours every week. Going to office hours can be very valuable if you have questions about the course or an assignments. However, I see a lot of posts telling students to go every week even if they don’t have a question. You don’t need to do this unless you want to! Often times, profs will even request that you talk to your TA before them.
  3. Emailing the prof if you miss class. Unless you go to a very small school, the prof is not going to notice if you miss class. You don’t need to email them telling them why you were absent, you can just go to a different section of the lecture or get the notes from someone. (If you have labs/tutorials/seminars, the same does not apply!! Email your TA.) 

Studying and Grades

  1. Starting to study for tests six weeks in advance. This is one piece of advice that always baffles me. The semester is only 12 weeks long (usually), so if you have a quiz in week 6, you can’t start studying for it much before week 4 or 5. Also, there is no way you will retain the finer details of things if you learned them 6 weeks before writing the test. 
  2. Guaranteeing a 4.0. I see a ton of posts telling students how to guarantee a 4.0 average or straight As. But honestly, as much as you do all of the readings and go to lectures and follow all of the studyblr advice out there, you can still get a TA who won’t give any mark higher than an 80. Just try your best and know that even though getting high marks is great, it is not the only indicator of success in uni. 
  3. Sitting in the front of the class. This is not a necessity. A lot of people post that if the prof can see your face and remember you, you will get better grades. However, in first year, the prof doesn’t mark your papers usually and even if they did, your paper doesn’t have a photo of you on it. Also, they teach so many classes I doubt they just naturally remember the first three rows of each one and no one else. Just sit where you are comfortable and can pay attention and see, and you will do fine. 
  4. Choosing your major in high school or based on what job you think you will get. If you think you want to major in something and then it turns out you hate it, that is fine! Your major should be a subject you are passionate about and can get good grades in, not something that you chose in high school or will “guarantee” you a good job (although, its also okay if your major is all of the above). 
  5. Taking full notes on a topic before the lecture. If you are going to the lecture with a ton of info already, it is easier to get distracted or to feel like you don’t need the lectures at all. Instead, take notes in the lecture and then supplement them with notes from readings or bonus material rather than the opposite way. 

Textbooks

  1. Buying textbooks online. I definitely think that buying textbooks online can be a good idea, but sometimes it is just easier to buy them from the bookstore. For example, if you are not sure if a site is legit/the book will come in time/its the right edition, etc. it might just be safer to get it in person or buy it used on campus from an upper year. (Remember, you can probably sell it next year!) 
  2. Buying old editions of textbooks. If you have the two books side by side and can tell that they are very similar, go for it. But often times, two different editions are totally different and can just mess you up. Science and math books often have different practice questions, and even in social sciences and humanities, the content can change drastically in one edition. 

Lifestyle/Personal

  1. Buying extra storage and furnishing for your dorm. Make sure you do a virtual room tour or talk to someone about the layout before you buy a ton of storage. Most dorm rooms that I have been in have a ton of storage (mine has a closet, a huge desk, shelves to the ceiling, a dresser, and cabinets for extra storage). You don’t want to show up with way too much stuff. 
  2. Keeping 1000 things in your backpack. If you live on campus, you don’t actually need to carry every single thing on earth in your bag. It will get annoying carrying around a heavy backpack while walking. Unless you are going to the library for a huge study sesh or can’t make it back to your room all day, pack lightly! 
  3. Avoiding wearing “freshman clothes”. No one cares what you are wearing. People often wear pajamas or just track pants and a baggy t-shirt to class or the caf. If you like dressing up, that’s great! But don’t feel like certain clothes are off limits. 
  4. Living at home meaning you aren’t independent. Posts that look down upon living at home or going to your home university are garbage posts in my opinion. Being able to live away from home is a privilege, and many people are not financially, physically, or emotionally able to do that. If you are living at home, do not feel bad about it. You are still an adult and you are still independent. 

Hope this helps reduce some rising freshman anxiety! And remember, if you do want to follow any of the original tips, that is okay too. :) 

anonymous asked:

I want to live by myself when I move out of my parent's place but I'm really afraid of money problems? I'm afraid that the only place I can afford will be in the ghetto and it'll all be torn apart and I'll only be allowed to eat one granola bar a week. I'm really stressing out about this. I don't know anything about after school life. I don't know anything about paying bills or how to buy an apartment and it's really scaring me. is there anything you know that can help me?

HI darling,

I’ve actually got a super wonderful masterpost for you to check out:

Home

Money

Health

Emergency

Job

Travel

Better You

Apartments/Houses/Moving

Education

Finances

Job Hunting

Life Skills

Miscellaneous

Relationships

Travel & Vehicles


Other Blog Features

Asks I’ll Probably Need to Refer People to Later

Adult Cheat Sheet:

Once you’ve looked over all those cool links, I have some general advice for you on how you can have some sort of support system going for you:

Reasons to move out of home

You may decide to leave home for many different reasons, including:

  • wishing to live independently
  • location difficulties – for example, the need to move closer to university
  • conflict with your parents
  • being asked to leave by your parents.

Issues to consider when moving out of home

It’s common to be a little unsure when you make a decision like leaving home. You may choose to move, but find that you face problems you didn’t anticipate, such as:

  • Unreadiness – you may find you are not quite ready to handle all the responsibilities.
  • Money worries – bills including rent, utilities like gas and electricity and the cost of groceries may catch you by surprise, especially if you are used to your parents providing for everything. Debt may become an issue.
  • Flatmate problems – issues such as paying bills on time, sharing housework equally, friends who never pay board, but stay anyway, and lifestyle incompatibilities (such as a non-drug-user flatting with a drug user) may result in hostilities and arguments.

Your parents may be worried

Think about how your parents may be feeling and talk with them if they are worried about you. Most parents want their children to be happy and independent, but they might be concerned about a lot of different things. For example:

  • They may worry that you are not ready.
  • They may be sad because they will miss you.
  • They may think you shouldn’t leave home until you are married or have bought a house.
  • They may be concerned about the people you have chosen to live with.

Reassure your parents that you will keep in touch and visit regularly. Try to leave on a positive note. Hopefully, they are happy about your plans and support your decision.

Tips for a successful move

Tips include:

  • Don’t make a rash decision – consider the situation carefully. Are you ready to live independently? Do you make enough money to support yourself? Are you moving out for the right reasons?
  • Draw up a realistic budget – don’t forget to include ‘hidden’ expenses such as the property’s security deposit or bond (usually four weeks’ rent), connection fees for utilities, and home and contents insurance.
  • Communicate – avoid misunderstandings, hostilities and arguments by talking openly and respectfully about your concerns with flatmates and parents. Make sure you’re open to their point of view too – getting along is a two-way street.
  • Keep in touch – talk to your parents about regular home visits: for example, having Sunday night dinner together every week.
  • Work out acceptable behaviour – if your parents don’t like your flatmate(s), find out why. It is usually the behaviour rather than the person that causes offence (for example, swearing or smoking). Out of respect for your parents, ask your flatmate(s) to be on their best behaviour when your parents visit and do the same for them.
  • Ask for help – if things are becoming difficult, don’t be too proud to ask your parents for help. They have a lot of life experience.

If your family home does not provide support

Not everyone who leaves home can return home or ask their parents for help in times of trouble. If you have been thrown out of home or left home to escape abuse or conflict, you may be too young or unprepared to cope.

If you are a fostered child, you will have to leave the state-care system when you turn 18, but you may not be ready to make the sudden transition to independence.

If you need support, help is available from a range of community and government organisations. Assistance includes emergency accommodation and food vouchers. If you can’t call your parents or foster parents, call one of the associations below for information, advice and assistance.

Where to get help

  • Your doctor
  • Kids Helpline Tel. 1800 55 1800
  • Lifeline Tel. 13 11 44
  • Home Ground Services Tel. 1800 048 325
  • Relationships Australia Tel. 1300 364 277
  • Centrelink Crisis or Special Help Tel. 13 28 50
  • Tenants Union of Victoria Tel. (03) 9416 2577

Things to remember

  • Try to solve any problems before you leave home. Don’t leave because of a fight or other family difficulty if you can possibly avoid it.
  • Draw up a realistic budget that includes ‘hidden’ expenses, such as bond, connection fees for utilities, and home and contents insurance.
  • Remember that you can get help from a range of community and government organizations. 

(source)

Keep me updated? xx

things to remember when you move out

•always have bottled water in your house/apartment
•pay your bills on time
•wash your dishes everyday
•don’t tell anyone you don’t trust you live alone
•call your mom and tell her you love her
•make sure you have extra toilet paper
•remember to close the curtains when changing
•lock all the windows and doors at night/before leaving the house
•double check that the stove is off
•don’t leave lights on too much
•use real plates instead of throwaways
•have flashlights in every room
•fruits and veggies are important
•night lights aren’t just for babies and kids
•electric and water bill are more important than cable
•don’t eat out too much
•do your laundry
•it’s okay to ask for help
•own at least two recipe books
•never lock yourself out
•but don’t hide a spare under a mat/plant
•don’t open the door without knowing who it is
•mop
•wash your bed spread a lot
•make sure you always have food in the fridge
•if you feel unsafe call someone
•candy/snacks are not meals

Adulting 103

I apologize for being MIA, I’m on vacation with the future father of my children. I hope ya’ll had a safe and happy holiday season and are looking forward to the new year as much as I am.

This week please send love to: @laurenashley96 and @thedarklordpanda

1. Automatic payments. Don’t enroll in automatic bill payments unless you’re extremely comfortable with the company. This will prevent companies from charing your bank account or credit card extra without your consent. For example, I’m confident that Birchbox won’t overcharge me, but have less faith in Verizon. 

2. First aid kit. Purchasing a first aid kit should be one of the first things you do when moving out. They generally cost around $25 and include items such as cold compresses, burn cream, and more bandaids then you will ever need. I purchased one when I first moved out and it lasted me 2 and ½ years before I needed to replenish it. 

3. Dishwasher wanted. Real talk- having a dishwasher has changed my life. I used to spend forty-five minutes to an hour doing dishes every day, sometimes twice a day. Now I spend fifteen minutes.

4. Pee after sex! Ladies, UTIs are no joke. Get in the habit of peeing or showering after sex to minimize your risk. 50% of women will get them in their lifetime, and the medication will fuck with your birth control. Guys can get UTIs too!

5. Milk. More expensive doesn’t always mean higher quality, but in the case of milk it makes a huge difference. Organic milk lasts significantly longer than any milk you can purchase for under $2. Like, over a week longer.

6. Winter-proof. Is your apartment freezing? Winter-proof your windows! You can buy sheets of “window plastic” to seal off gaps, cracks, etc. These will make a huge difference in your apartment’s temperature.

7. Scented trash bags. Are literally the same price as regular trash bags, but help keep your trash smelling manageable. 

8. Chalkboard paint. This is a wonderful invention that turns your boring walls into one continuous canvas. Get your landlord’s permission and know that you will be required to repaint before moving out.

9. Shopping list. Keep a piece of scrap paper in your kitchen and jot down any items/produce you may run out of during the week. When it’s time to go shopping, you’ll already have most of your list completed.

10. Food hygiene. Rewrap/repackage your deli meats and cheeses a few days after purchasing them. Wrapping paper has a shorter shelf life than the products themselves and will cause them to spoil early.

I definitely recommend for anyone moving away from their parents for the first time–whether it be moving to a school campus, or into a new apartment with a friend–make a small investment.

Thing is, when your sick in your new adult life, you aren’t going to have mum and dad to take care of you. The first time I really got sick away from my parents was awful. I had a serious stomach flu. And I wasn’t prepared. I ended up having to go shopping for things while I was still sick, because I didn’t even have friends around at the time to go out for me.

So what I recommend is making sure you have some things to help your recovery long before your ever sick. If you like, stick it in an “All That Ails Me” box. My personal must haves are as follows:

  • Some sort of electrolyte source; personally I go for Gatorade or Powerade, but if you prefer something healthier, coconut water is supposedly quite a good source, or you can make your own ‘gatorade’ with some fruit juice diluted in water and a pinch of salt.
  • Broth and broth based soups; if you can’t keep solid food down, broth is a pretty good way to get some nutrition until you can. Broth based soups are also good as you start to transition back into a normal diet.
  • BRAT foods are recommended by most healthcare professionals; they’re easy on the digestive system: Bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast. You can usually keep rice and applesauce on hand and all times. Crackers are a good replacement for toast in my opinion.
  • Anything really with ginger (such as gingerale, or ginger tea) to help settle an upset stomach (make sure to let the gingerale flatten first if you go that route though)
  • Hot water bottle, for aches and pains
  • Make sure you have any medications that help with things like diarrhea or vomiting; tylenol, imodium, etc.
  • Tea; personally I have the Cold Surivival Kit from David’s Tea, which I love and it covers your bases (stomach ache, sniffles, sore throat), and I always try to have medicated lemon tea on hand since it puts me right to sleep and relieves everything from cough to runny nose. But any tea in general is good since they’re easy to get down, provide some nutrition, and the heat can help relieve various aches, pains, and other issues. 
  • Puke bucket; just keep one in your closet for such an occasion. It’s better than hanging over the public dorm toilets or running to the bathroom in your apartment
  • Favourite movie, stuffed animal, music, etc; I mean, you’ll probably have this anyway, and it won’t stop you from puking your guts out, but it may make you feel a little bit better when your sick and have no one to take care of you. 

These are my main suggestions, and probably the most important things, but make sure you take account of what your parents usually do to take care of you when you’re sick and help you feel better, and go out and buy that stuff so you have it on hand and are prepared if you ever get ill yourself. The things needed isn’t going to be exactly the same for everyone, since some people have little things that there parents did differently to care for them, or have other foods that they find do the same thing. Point is, make sure you have it on hand

9 Tips for living alone

For a year now I’ve been living away from home for college. This has meant a ton of new things and challenges etc. and I thought I’d make a list of helpful tips for when you move out on your own I guess?

1: Make lists
Groceries, homework, chores, everything really. It will help you keep organized. It’ll keep you from getting stressed about having lots of things going on or having to keep track of what you need to buy.
2: Do. Your. Dishes.
Going somewhere over the weekend? Do the dishes before you leave. Even if you think there’s not much gunk on them. I cannot tell you how many times I forgot/didn’t have time to do the dishes before I left for the weekend, and came back to a smelly apartment and gross dishes…
3: Get contacts and telephone numbers
You might get sick enough to not be able to buy groceries, you might be stuck somewhere in town without a way to get home, something in your apartment might be malfunctioning etc. Make a list of important telephone numbers and have it somewhere in your house where you can see it. Try to make contacts in town, not necessarily friends, but just people you are acquainted with enough to call when you really need help or advice.
4: Keep your apartment/room tidy and organized
You think you won’t get visitors? Wrong. You can and you will. Even if you’re home sick or just simply can’t clean for some reason, try to keep it at least a little bit cleaned up. From own experience I can tell you that it’s not nice having guests when your socks are on the dining table…
5:
Talk to your neighbours
It’s 100% nicer to live somewhere when you know who lives around you. Go knock on some doors and introduce yourself. If you’re like me and stay up late a lot, a good idea is to tell people that. I was very worried that if I was in Skype calls at night, I’d disturb my closest neighbour. But I sorted that out by simply asking if they’d been disturbed by any noise and that they could tell me if I had been too loud so I could just y’know, not do that. Be friendly and helpful, they will most likely treat you the same. I can guarantee you that no one wants to be your enemy unless you give them a reason to dislike you. If you have disputes, sort them out. Talk to them and work out a solution. Everyone just wants to live in peace and be comfortable in their homes.
6: Keep updated with your town
Keep updated with the news and current events, be on the lookout for things that interest you. Participating in an event of some sort is a great way to get out and see things and explore your town. It’s also really good for meeting new, possibly like-minded people. Check your town’s site (or local paper) if it has one, is there any upcoming events or special things going on? Is there something you would want to help arrange or participate in? Engage yourself! It’s sure to give you new experiences and contacts. Even if you’re like me and socially awkward, doing things on your own will help build confidence and you’ll have tons of fun while doing it!
7: Get a backpack
If your grocery store is further away than a 15 minute walk, you better get a backpack. It will help you carry things home and not having several heavy plastic bags that might break at any time. It will also conveniently give you free hands if you have a bike. It’s great for college too!
8: Don’t be afraid of independence
Go shopping, go to cafés, go to the cinema, read a book in the park. Break the notion that it’s tragic to see someone do ‘typically social’ things by themselves. It takes a lot of courage, but trust me, it’s worth it. Don’t let being on your own stop you from doing things.
9: Teach yourself things
It can be everything from boiling rice to fixing a broken chair. Look up some tutorials, I guarantee you will have use for your newly aquired skills, regardless of how small they are. You’ll also feel very proud once you’ve figured out how to do said thing. People will also most likely take you more seriously as an independent adult if you are able to handle things by yourself.

Adulting 105

This week I’m giving a shoutout to my fav person ever @poorpersonsgiude. You go girl! Also @stormfallss for lighting up my phone for over two hours the other night. Thanks for the love.

1. Keep paper bills. Bills such as internet, rent, and utility for up to five months. These help prove residency, which will be useful when applying for Medicaid, in-state tuition, and for some jobs. If you’re not receiving any sort of paper bills, keep pay stubs with your address on them instead.

2. Cheap salt. Never spend more than a dollar on salt. Seriously. Chain supermarkets and dollar stores will sell large quantities of it to you for 99 cents. You’re not the Queen of Sheba- you don’t need $5 salt.

3. Wooden floors. If any part of you apartment/dorm room has a wooden floor, consider buying Bona Hardwood Cleaner. It’s a little pricey, but my last squeeze bottle lasted me just short of a year. It’s the best wood cleaner around.

4. Postage stamps. You don’t have to go to your local post office to buy stamps (which is great because sometimes it’s not “local” at all). You can purchase them at pharmacy centers like CVS or Rite Aid, as well as large chain supermarkets such as Stop & Shop and Walmart. 

5. Moisturizers. Pick up at least one moisturizer to save your hands during these long winter months. If you’re a newbie just buy Gold Bond, it’s cheap and good for everything except your face. 

6. Shower heads. If you have a terrible apartment shower head with no water pressure buy yourself a better one. There a color changing shower heads on Amazon that I personally swear by. Just be sure to keep the original shower head and to replace it when you move out.

7. Keep your student ID card. Even after you stop attending school. You’ll still be able to receive student discounts at places like museums and cinemas. They have no way of knowing if you’re still a student. What are they gonna do- call your school? I do this all the time! 

8. Yankee Candle. Is so expensive, but it’s the only candle really worth buying. I’ve tried all sorts of discount candles from dollar stores and even from Target, but none of them smell even half as good as Yankee Candle.

9. Reminders. Forgetting important things such as bill payments, birthdays, or contraceptives? Set alarms and reminders on your Iphone to help you stay on top. I personally hate the Iphone calendar app so I downloaded Cozi (it’s free) and I use that instead.

10. Clean that fridge. Try to purge your fridge out at least once a month. There’s nothing more disgusting than food so decomposed that you can’t discern what it once was. The general rule of thumb about leftovers is if you don’t eat it within the next two days you won’t ever eat it. Try to give your fridge a sponge bath every three months, the shelves are easy to remove and I just wash them in my sink.

A List.

In celebration of me living on my own for almost exactly a year now, here’s a list.

If you’re a mentally 12 yo person who suddenly finds themselves in a flat of their own and has no idea how to adult, hi! Me too. Here’s a list of things I’ve realised are essential p much from the start:

  • some sort of paper towel. Toilet paper, napkins, anything. You can do a lot of cleaning with just paper towels. 
  • Toast. Toast is my best friend. You don’t need any of the other foods, as long as you have some toast.
  • (A toaster. Not as important as the toast itself, but makes all the difference in enjoying it. Also makes you feel like you’re an adult for some reason?? I mean, you’ve got a toaster. V adult.)
  • At least one pot/pan.
  • RUBBISH BAGS. OTHER PLASTIC BAGS. KEEP H&M BAGS FROM YOUR LATEST SHOPPING IF YOU CAN’T FIND ANYTHING ELSE BUT YOU’RE GONNA NEED PLASTIC BAGS.
  • (unless you’re vegan) Milk. You wouldn’t believe how many things you need milk for, and how fast it’s all gone. (Maybe this one’s just me though. I love milk)
  • (again, if you’re non-vegan) EGGS! YOU CAN MAKE SO MUCH OUT OF EGGS. YOU CAN MAKE SCRAMBLED EGG, HARDBOILED EGG, PANCAKES, COOKIES, CAKE, YOUR OWN BREAD okay, maybe that’s for later. But have eggs. They also almost never go bad if you keep them cold enough
  • Coffee. Even if you don’t like coffee (wtf) you’re gonna want coffee. You’re an adult now. You’re gonna have people visit you, and, presuming you’re not the most social person in the world, you’ll want to be able to do something other than talk. Making coffee is a great excuse to move around, and won’t even seem rude! Also you’ll need coffee because seriously, how else do people survive
  • I have realised that this has almost solely been about food up to this point. And food is important, but you know what’s even more important? Sleep.
  • BUY A BED. A REAL BED. NO, NOT JUST A MATTRESS. Honestly, you’re gonna want a bed. You’re not gonna want to buy one, but do it. It’s worth it. And when you’ve purchased one, ASSEMBLE IT. OR MAKE YOUR FRIENDS ASSEMBLE IT. DON’T SIT ON THE CARTONS FOR THREE WEEKS. 
  • Something to organise your clothes in. Doesn’t have to be a huge wardrobe, maybe just a clothes rag and some boxes/a shelf. NOT the boxes from your move. That’s gonna turn into the biggest mess real soon, believe me this one took me way too long
  • More than one mug.
  • Plates. Also more than one. Because IF you ever decide to show off your phenomenal cooking abilities, it’s a real bummer to find out you’ve got nothing to present your perfectly reheated chicken nuggets on.
  • At least one big mixing bowl. You don’t even know how many things you’re gonna want to mix. But you’re a free person now, so, as long as you’ve got a bowl, you can do about anything! But don’t eat an entire bowl of raw cookie dough. Just don’t. Seriously.
  • Sponges. You’re gonna need so many sponges. Also soap. Also more sponges.
  • Scented candles. Because scented candles are great.

I’m by no means an expert, but I have survived on my own for almost a year now, so basically I just wanna pet myself on the shoulder for that thanks me @ me u survived

Adulting 104

I had all the good intentions of posting this yesterday, but I got sick and spent the entire day blowing my nose into an assortment of paper products. I love you guys and hope your week has been productive and positive.

Shoutout this week to @tylersneverland​ and @bisexualgradient​. Just keep doin’ you!

1. Reuse containers. Get takeout often? Takeout containers are microwave and dishwasher safe, and are often durable enough to substitute as tupperware. Wash and reuse them!

2. Kick the soda habit. Switch to seltzer! Zero calories, carbonated, and they come in so many different flavors. I’m partial to Polar and Schweppes seltzer, but you can buy store brands for a fraction of the price (the Stop & Shop brand is particularly good).

3. Electric budget. Stop what you’re doing and get on a budget with your electric company. Instead of paying for how much electricity you actually use each month, you will pay a monthly flat fee. If you use more, they cannot charge you for it. Electric companies say that people use more electricity in the winter and less in the summer, so the difference evens out. At the end of the year they will issue you a check if they owe you money or credit it to your account. Last year I ended up overpaying and my electric company credited the difference to my account, and I had free electric for two months. 

4. Check your screens. This applies to pets in general, but especially to cats. Before allowing your pet to sit on the window ledge or by the screen door, make sure that the screen is secure. Rental units are notorious for their cheap craftsmanship, I secure my screens with duct tape because they’re so poorly made.

5. Laundry. Doing laundry in a communal area? Always check to make sure that the lint drawer has been properly cleaned before starting your dryer. Not only is it dangerous (I personally know someone whose house burned down because of a rogue dryer) but it will prevent your clothes from drying properly.

6. Soak it. Hard to scrub pot? Fill it with water and soap and let it sit for five minutes- I guarantee you it will be easier to clean. If something is really scorched and difficult to clean, let it soak overnight. 

7. Foaming hand soap. Lasts about three times as long as liquid hand soap, and is roughly the same price.

8. Invest in a multi-functional printer. As a college student, this may seem like a daunting expense, but it’s a necessary one. You can always use a college or library to print or copy at, but some places charge up to 50 cents per copy. If you need a reliable source for printing homework, make the investment. 

9. Skip the mixed salad. Instead of a buying a container of mixed salad greens, purchase only one type of leaf. Each lettuce has its own expiration date, and greens that have a shorter shelf life will go bad and take everything else in the container with them. 

10. Check your blinds. Here’s something I didn’t know before living on my own- there is a right and a wrong way to face blinds. Close your blinds and stand in front of them. Can you see out of them? If you can’t then flip your blinds around the other way. People will be able to see you through the slits in your blinds if they aren’t hung properly.  

Things to Buy Once You’ve Moved Out On Your Own
Mr. Clean Magic Erasers–seriously, that is good shit

Rubber Gloves (for washing dishes)

Cheap cutlery/plates. Something OTHER than plastic

It’s free, but make sure you have a Library Card!

Spices– it can really add some variety to your life of Ramen Noodles and cans of Tuna

Stock up on cheap snacks like raisins and granola bars. 

Different kinds of soap–bars, dishwashing, and hand.

Calendar

Bulletin/White Board

A nice warm hat

Moving Out Checklist

Living Room:
Couch
Cushions
Lamps
TV
TV stand
DVD/game console
Coffee table and end tables
Curtains or blinds (whole house)

Office:
Desk
Office chair
Computer
Mouse bad
Keyboard
Monitor
Printer/scanner/fax
Landline phone
Paper
Pens/pencils/other
Scissors
Stapler
Filing cabinet/folders
Tape
Ink cartridges

Kitchen:
Refrigerator
Stove
Microwave
Coffee Maker
Tupperware
Measuring cups
Can opener
Garbage can
Trash bags
Mixing bowls
Casserolw dish
Blender
Hand mixer
Colander
Pots/pans
Baking dishes
Drying rack
Knife set
Cutting board
Silverware
Spoons, spatulas, ladles (you need more than you think)
Plates and bowls
Mugs and glasses
Hand towels
Salt and pepper shakers
Oven mitts
Ziplock baggies
Aluminum Foil
Wax paper
Plastic wrap
Cabinet Liners
Cooking Oil (vegetable, canola, olive, w/e)

Dining Room:
Table
Chairs or stools
Place mats
Table cloths

Bathroom:
Toilet Paper
Toilet brush
Plunger
Tooth brush
Toothpaste
Mouthwash
Floss
Soap (bar and hand)
Shampoo
Conditioner
Body soap
Rags
Towels
Loofah
Shower curtain and rod
Lotion
Nail trimmers
Tweezers
First aid kit
Trashcan
Tissues
Any other bathroom items you may need (like face wash, contact solution, so on)

Bedroom:
Bed (mattress, box spring, frame)
Sheets (multiple sets)
Blankets (multiple)
End tables
Dressers
Wardrobe
Coat hangers
Mirror
Lamps
Alarm clocks
Waste basket

Utility Room:
Washer
Dryer
Hanging rack/clothes organizer
Shelves
Table for folding
Iron and ironing board
Laundry hamper
Laundry baskets
Waste basket
Dryer sheets
Laundry detergent
Fabric softener
More clothes hangers
Stain removal pen or detergent

Cleaning:
Trash bags
Rags and hand towels
Spongers/scrubbers
Mop
Broom
Dust pan
Vaccum
Duster
Bucket
Rubber gloves
Multipurpose cleaner
Bleach
Vinegar
Ammonia
Oven Cleaner
Air freshener
Toilet Cleaner
Glass cleaner
Antibacterial wipes
Wood polish
Paper towels

Other:
Tools
Light bulbs
Flash Lights
Candles
Matches/lighter/light fluid
Emergency Kit
Fire alarms
Fire extinguisher
Power strips
Extension chords
First aid kit
Batteries
Back up chargers and cables

Note: You do not absolutely need every last thing on this list. This is just what I believe to be a pretty good list of what someone might possibly need in a new home. You can cross out whatever doesn’t suite your lifestyle.

Alright, I think that’s about it. I probably forgot some things, but I tried to be as thorough as I could. This is roundabout everything I had before moving in. It honestly made living on my own so much easier. Not only that but I cut back on costs by not having to run to the store every five seconds because I forgot something.

My bathroom closet (featured in the picture above) is just one of the placed I keep my stock. I stock up like crazy, on everything. What I bought before moving in lasted me a whole year before I had to stock up again. It was amazing and I’ll be breaking down where/how I found the best deals to do this.

I wish I was an extreme couponer (have you seen their stock rooms?!?!?) because they just do it better.

Any questions or comments (like “Hey! You forgot (blank) and I’ll add it to the list) are super welcome!

Saving money at home

According to the big manual on moving out

Electricity/water

  • Turn off hot water when using soap/shampoo
  • Wash and clean laundry/dishes in full machines only
  • Switch out lightbulbs to low-energy ones
  • Remove device chargers from the sockets when they’re not used for charging
  • Use a boiler kettle when getting water for e.g. pasta 

Food

  • Lentils, beans and soup are cheap alternatives
  • Buy fruit and vegetables based on seasons to get a better price
  • Cook more portions to put in the freezer
  • Make use of coupons

Magazines/papers/books

  • Share the newspaper with the neighbor
  • Read magazines at the library instead of subscribing
  • Make use of the local library instead of buying books, or borrow/trade with friends

Clothes

  • Always check out sales. Buy basic things like pants and shirts on sale, and save money for the more expensive things like jackets and shoes
  • You can find some pretty neat stuff in second hand shops
  • Trade with friends. Gather the clothes you no longer want, let your friends do the same, and throw a trade party

softlyangelic  asked:

i'm so scared to live alone.... any tips?

You know I do! Living alone is a really intense and exciting experience, offering you the chance to explore your independence. It may seem daunting at first because you’re solely responsible for taking care of all your shopping, cleaning, and home related maintenance. But if you go into this experience prepared and confident, you’ll do fine- you’ll flourish!

Living alone is definitely not for everybody, especially if you’re an extraverted or super social person. In this case, you may want to buddy up with a friend and look into two bedroom apartments. Ask yourself- will you be okay spending a day on your own without interacting face-to-face with anybody? If the answer is no, you should find a roommate. 

Check out this post which details how to locate, inspect, and set up your first apartment. And…

Living Alone

1. PKW. Phone, keys, wallet. Every time you go anywhere. Check twice. The worst part of living on your own is having to rely on yourself to never forget to lock yourself out or leave your wallet at a sandwich shop in a mall. Make absolutely sure you have duplicates of your keys (I would get a couple made) and give one to a friend who lives nearby who you can count on. I also like to keep an extra set inside the apartment itself in a secure place, just in case. Your landlord can let you in during office hours, but giving a key to a trustworthy friend helps you 24/7.

2. Cleaning routine. You don’t have to sit down at a writing desk and draft this out, but spend a few minutes coming up with a basic cleaning regime for you to follow. It’s definitely easier to do a little each day, but if that doesn’t work for your schedule set aside at least an hour and a half during your time off to get your apartment spotless. I don’t know about you, but whenever I deep clean my apartment I feel like I’m living in a hotel for a day, and I absolutely love it.

3. Make a “moving” shopping list. This is everything you will need (minus food) for your first week at your new place. First aid kit, cleaning supplies, tape, cat food, etc. Your first week moving into your new place will be stressful enough, you don’t want to be halfway through setting up your living room and realize that you forgot to buy trash bags.

4. Secure yourself. I’m not the most agile or fast person in the world, and I do live in a mid-sized city that has a good deal of crime. The apartment complex I live in is very safe, but I still like to double lock my front door at night. It might be smart to keep some pepper spray or a baseball bat somewhere in your apartment, just in case.

5. Stay social. Even the most anti-social person gets lonely. Make sure to hang out with your friends, not just your co-workers, your actual friends. Get out off your apartment every few days and go see a movie, get a cup of coffee, go people watching at the park, etc. It’s easy to get depressed if you’re living alone and doing the same things the same way every day- allow yourself to mix it up.

6. Meal prep. It can be stressful and seem useless to cook complicated or “fancy” meals when you’re living on your own. Plan your meals for the week and make a list before going shopping. Get yourself enough food to make a variety of dinners that will only take you fifteen minutes. If you do want to go crazy and make steak and mashed potatoes for yourself, make enough for two meals. Also, nobody is going to think poorly of you for stocking your fridge with a couple frozen dinners.

7. Customer service. Living alone means that you are going to be doing a lot of talking to customer service representatives. Get comfortable talking to people over the phone. Tell the rep what you need as quickly as you can, and try to be polite because customer service at a phone center is a garbage job that doesn’t pay well. On the flip side, don’t be afraid to ask for a manager if you’re upset or unhappy with your service. Take their survey at the end of your phone call, tell them how unhappy you are. It’s someone’s shitty job to look at all those surveys, no complaint goes unheard. Companies with great phone service: Verizon, Apple, Amazon. Companies with awful phone service: USPS (literally the worst), electric companies, health insurance companies.

8. Guest space. This is not required, but it’s a good idea to have some sort of space for a friend to stay the night. A friend of mine had a bad breakup, showed up at my apartment with ten minute’s notice, and then fell asleep on my couch after an hour of crying. It as 7:30! Whatever, she needed it. Keep an extra blanket and pillow in your closet, I like to keep travel sized shampoos and conditioners in my bathroom cabinet on the off chance a guest wants to use my shower. I got these at a hotel for free, but they’re available at CVS and other pharmacies.

9. Toilet paper. Don’t let yourself run out of toilet paper! I like to buy more when I notice I only have one roll left. The same deal goes for paper towels.

10. Enjoy. Living on your own is simoltaneously exciting and exhausting, but an all around must-have experience. Enjoy the freedom to forget to make the bed, to decorate your bathroom however you want, to have ice cream for dinner, to watch reruns of Friends and cry when Rachel decides to move to France. Make sure to give yourself lots of space to move at your own pace, but please remember to eat three meals a day and to go to the doctor’s for a checkup at least once a year!