movie: the lord of the rings

  • <p> <b>Tolkien:</b> By the end of the Third Age, Sauron's physical power is so diminished that his presence is confined to the tower of Barad-Dur. However, he is still immensely powerful in his ability to watch and predict the movements of his enemies, and his understanding extends so far that he could metaphorically be referred to as a Great Eye, constantly watching and planning his next move. And because his gaze is so piercing, it is sometimes likened to fire.<p/><b>Peter Jackson:</b> Okay but...hear me out...what if Sauron was literally....a Great Eye.<p/><b>Tolkien:</b> What.<p/><b>Peter Jackson:</b> What if he was literally a giant eyeball on the top of Barad-Dur.<p/><b>Tolkien:</b> That's not quite what I inten-<p/><b>Peter Jackson:</b> Made of FIRE. A LITERAL GIANT FIERY EYEBALL.<p/></p>
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Many that live deserve death. Some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them, Frodo? Do not be too eager to deal out death in judgment. Even the very wise cannot see all ends. My heart tells me that Gollum has some part to play yet, for good or ill before this is over. The pity of Bilbo may rule the fate of many.

   According to Tolkien, Faramir was “modest, fair-minded and scrupulously just, and very merciful”. He mentioned once that he did not invent Faramir, though he liked the character very much. As a soldier in World War I, Tolkien connected himself with Faramir, who only loved swords for “which they defend”. Among the characters, Tolkien wrote, As far as any character is ‘like me’, it is Faramir”.