movie: ratatouille

hey hey hey you remember ratatouille? that movie was fuckin wild. in the first 20m a woman points a shotgun at the protagonist and tries to shoot him multiple times, brings down the roof of her own house, and subsequently gasses it. then the rat goes to paris and meets the bastard son of a dead chef and almost dies. again. several times. many times! almost gets locked in an oven. and then drowned. then some shit happens and he controls the bastard son by pulling on his hair. also the bastard chef gets drunk at least once. it’s explicit too like the scheming sous chef brings this 18 y/o or whatever into his office and gets him drunk because he wants the kid to admit that he’s a successful chef because of a tiny hair-pulling rat puppeteer who lives in his hat. and all throughout it the rat is grappling with the ethical conflict of whether stealing is right, and how to reconcile the wasted excesses of capitalism with his belief in private property and self-earned worth, especially when he comes from an impoverished background where stealing was necessary. and the underlying motif is how art isn’t an exclusive club, and how making art accessible to everyone is critical to the expansion and success of art itself, and the importance of honesty in relationships. also the human protagonist’s name is linguini

sorry but ratatouille’s ending is such a perfect ending. i gotta be honest: even with movies i adore, the ending doesn’t tend to be my favorite part, even when they are good. i’m usually all for the middle, the journey, the action. 

but this fucking ending is an exception. just put it on and i’ll tear up over that brilliant representation of how just one little thing (such as a simple bite of simple food) can bring back the most nostalgic childhood memories full force, in an instant. that great speech by ego, where he finally understands what gusteau really meant when he said that anyone can cook. that cozy little restaurant they end up opening. that beautiful, soothing song in french. ego, no longer a respected critic but clearly much happier, walking into the restaurant knowing the truth and asking remy, ‘surprise me!’, just. it’s so good. i love it.

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Remy - Ratatouille Ham Potato Leek Soup

“Boneapetit!” - Remy

WHAT YOU’LL NEED

  • 3-4 Russet Potatoes (Sliced)
  • 2 Leeks
  • 3 Tpbs Butter
  • 3 ½ Cups Chicken Broth 
  • 1 Large Rat
  • 1 Cup Heavy Cream
  • 1 Large Onion (Finely Diced)
  • 1 Pinch of Chives (Per Bowl)

HOW TO MAKE IT

  1. Melt butter in saucepan on medium heat. Add onions and leeks. Cook until onions are translucent.
  1. Prepare Rat by skinning and gutting. Remove head, tail, and bones. then dice into cubes, sauteing the chunks in separate pan with oil. Season with Salt and Pepper to taste
  1. Transfer both into large cooking pot along with sliced potatoes. Add in your Chicken Broth.
  1. Using Potato masher, mash potatoes until desired consistency and texture. Then add in your Heavy Cream. Feel free to add more cream if you desire a more creamy soup. Stir well and and let sit for 5 minutes before serving. Top with Chives.

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get to know me ☰ (2/10) animations —  ratatouille

In the past, I have made no secret of my disdain for Chef Gusteau’s famous motto, “Anyone can cook.” But I realize, only now do I truly understand what he meant. Not everyone can become a great artist; but a great artist can come from anywhere. It is difficult to imagine more humble origins than those of the genius now cooking at Gusteau’s, who is, in this critic’s opinion, nothing less than the finest chef in France. I will be returning to Gusteau’s soon, hungry for more.

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