mountains for miles

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Time for some Scotland photos! It was seriously difficult paring my photos down and picking just a handful to post (I took 1100 photos just in Scotland!), and I’m still going to have to break them up into two posts!

It was cold and wet pretty much the entire time we were there but we still got to do so many amazing things! Edinburgh is an incredibly gorgeous city; every street looks like something out of a fairy tale, particularly the idyllic Dean’s Village (last photo). It might sound strange, but coming from Texas, I was blown away by just how GREEN Scotland is. And there’s flowers everywhere. Lots of thistles particularly, including some the size of my friend’s head- no joke (second photo). We walked the Royal Mile, visited Holyrood Palace (the ruined abbey there is beautiful), Edinburgh Castle, The World’s End pub, Elephant House Cafe where JK Rowling wrote most of Harry Potter, and of course had to make a pitstop at the print shop, or its exterior at least. 

Next post: the Highlands!

Your body is capable of almost anything if you treat it the way it deserves to be treated. You can climb mountains, run for miles and bend in ways that make people cringe, with the nourishment and love that you should always be striving to give it. Try loving your body, treat it as if it is a old friend, as if you want it to function into old age, and see what your body gives you back.
— 

Bodies are made for love by Amy Kennedy

13/03/17

Like this? Check out my book here!

Solar System: Things to Know This Week

Our Dawn mission to the asteroid belt is no ordinary deep space expedition. 

Instead of traditional chemical rockets, the spacecraft uses sophisticated ion engines for propulsion. This enabled Dawn to become the first mission to orbit not one, but two different worlds — first the giant asteroid Vesta and now the dwarf planet Ceres. Vesta and Ceres formed early in the solar system’s history, and by studying them, the mission is helping scientists go back in time to the dawn of the planets. To mark a decade since Dawn was launched on Sept. 27, 2007, here are 10 things to know about this trailblazing mission.

1. Ion Engines: Not Just for Sci-Fi Anymore

Most rocket engines use chemical reactions for propulsion, which tend to be powerful but short-lived. Dawn’s futuristic, hyper-efficient ion propulsion system works by using electricity to accelerate ions (charged particles) from xenon fuel to a speed seven to 10 times that of chemical engines. Ion engines accelerate the spacecraft slowly, but they’re very thrifty with fuel, using just milligrams of xenon per second (about 10 ounces over 24 hours) at maximum thrust. Without its ion engines, Dawn could not have carried enough fuel to go into orbit around two different solar system bodies. Try your hand at an interactive ion engine simulation.

2. Time Capsules 

Scientists have long wanted to study Vesta and Ceres up close. Vesta is a large, complex and intriguing asteroid. Ceres is the largest object in the entire asteroid belt, and was once considered a planet in its own right after it was discovered in 1801. Vesta and Ceres have significant differences, but both are thought to have formed very early in the history of the solar system, harboring clues about how planets are constructed. Learn more about Ceres and Vesta—including why we have pieces of Vesta here on Earth.

3. Portrait of a Dwarf Planet

This view of Ceres built from Dawn photos is centered on Occator Crater, home of the famous “bright spots.” The image resolution is about 460 feet (140 meters) per pixel.

Take a closer look.

4. What’s in a Name? 

Craters on Ceres are named for agricultural deities from all over the world, and other features carry the names of agricultural festivals. Ceres itself was named after the Roman goddess of corn and harvests (that’s also where the word “cereal” comes from). The International Astronomical Union recently approved 25 new Ceres feature names tied to the theme of agricultural deities. Jumi, for example, is the Latvian god of fertility of the field. Study the full-size map.

5. Landslides or Ice Slides? 

Thanks to Dawn, evidence is mounting that Ceres hides a significant amount of water ice. A recent study adds to this picture, showing how ice may have shaped the variety of landslides seen on Ceres today.

6. The Lonely Mountain 

Ahuna Mons, a 3-mile-high (5-kilometer-high) mountain, puzzled Ceres explorers when they first found it. It rises all alone above the surrounding plains. Now scientists think it is likely a cryovolcano — one that erupts a liquid made of volatiles such as water, instead of rock. “This is the only known example of a cryovolcano that potentially formed from a salty mud mix, and that formed in the geologically recent past,” one researcher said. Learn more.

7. Shining a Light on the Bright Spots 

The brightest area on Ceres, located in the mysterious Occator Crater, has the highest concentration of carbonate minerals ever seen outside Earth, according to studies from Dawn scientists. Occator is 57 miles (92 kilometers) wide, with a central pit about 6 miles (10 kilometers) wide. The dominant mineral of this bright area is sodium carbonate, a kind of salt found on Earth in hydrothermal environments. This material appears to have come from inside Ceres, and this upwelling suggests that temperatures inside Ceres are warmer than previously believed. Even more intriguingly, the results suggest that liquid water may have existed beneath the surface of Ceres in recent geological time. The salts could be remnants of an ocean, or localized bodies of water, that reached the surface and then froze millions of years ago. See more details.

8. Captain’s Log 

Dawn’s chief engineer and mission director, Marc Rayman, provides regular dispatches about Dawn’s work in the asteroid belt. Catch the latest updates here.

9. Eyes on Dawn 

Another cool way to retrace Dawn’s decade-long flight is to download NASA’s free Eyes on the Solar System app, which uses real data to let you go to any point in the solar system, or ride along with any spacecraft, at any point in time—all in 3-D.

10. No Stamp Required

Send a postcard from one of these three sets of images that tell the story of dwarf planet Ceres, protoplanet Vesta, and the Dawn mission overall.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.

Roleplaying A God...

MEETING A GOD

When player characters meet a deity, they’re meeting a being with senses that extend for miles. 

A deity merely has to think of or desire something to have it. 

Its awareness of its portfolio covers vast areas, and its control of the building blocks of matter, energy, and life makes it the master of most situations, particularly on the Material Plane. 

The awesome presence of a deity cows most mortals, and may drive them from the deity in fear. 

Gods seek out mortals who do great deeds that favor the gods, as well as those who threaten their power, primacy, or existence. 

Even when a god graces a mortal or a group of mortals with its physical presence, that god’s attention is effortlessly in several places at once. 

Mortals who reach the home of a deity irritate that power with their interruption. 

They can expect a much cooler (or hotter, depending on the deity and the plane) reception. 

As the Dungeon Master, you manipulate the experience of meeting a god to suit your campaign. 

You can frighten the player characters or welcome them, depending on how you want the characters to feel about their deities, and how much you want the characters to interact with them. 

Depending on what kind of pantheon you have, you may be able to draw inspiration from elsewhere.

Keep reading

Daybreak at Gale Crater

This computer-generated images depicts part of Mars at the boundary between darkness and daylight, with an area including Gale Crater, beginning to catch morning light.

Gale Crater is 96 miles (154 kilometers) in diameter and holds a layered mountain rising about 3 miles (5 kilometers) above the crater floor. The intended landing site is at 4.5 degrees south latitude, 137.4 degrees east longitude.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Images of Change

Our planet is constantly changing, and we use the vantage point of space to increase our understanding of Earth, improve lives and safeguard our future. 

These images show change over time, with periods ranging from centuries to years. Some of these effects are related to climate change, some are not. Some document the effects of urbanization or the ravage of natural hazards such as fires and floods. All show our planet in a state of flux. Take a look…

Urban Expansion in New Delhi, India

Between the times these two images were taken, the population of India’s capital and its suburbs (known collectively as “Delhi”) ballooned from 9.4 million to 25 million. It is now second in population only to Tokyo, which has 38 million people.

Great Salt Lake Shrinkage, Utah

Dramatic change in the area of the Great Salt Lake over the past 25 years. The lake was filled to near capacity in 1985 because feeder streams were charged with snowmelt and heavy rainfall. In contrast, the 2010 image shows the lake shriveled by drought. The Promontory Peninsula (protruding into the lake from the top) is surrounded by water on three sides in the first image, but is landlocked on its eastern side in the second.

Exceptional Early Ice Melt, Greenland

Meltwater streams, rivers and lakes form in the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet every spring or early summer, but melting began exceptionally early in 2016. Melting encourages further melting when pods of meltwater develop, since they darken the surface and absorb more sunlight than ice does. Surface melt contributes to sea-level rise when the water runs off into the ocean.

Iran’s Lake Urmia Changes Color

Some combination of algae and bacteria is periodically turning Iran’s Lake Urmia from green to red. The change typically occurs when summer heat and dryness evaporate water, increasing the lake’s saltiness. Data from satellites indicate that the lake has lost about 70% of its surface area over the last 14 years.

Owens Lake Degradation, California

Owens Lake lies in the Owens Valley between the Sierra Nevada and the Inyo Mountains, about 130 miles north of Los Angeles, California. For thousands of years, it was one of the most important stopover sites in the western U.S. for migrating waterfowl and shore birds. However, in the early 20th century, the lower Owens River, which fed the lake, was largely diverted to the Los Angeles aqueduct. Water from springs and artesian wells kept some of the lake alive, but toxic chemicals and dust impinged on the regional environment and disturbed the bird habitat.

Baban Rafi Deforestation, Niger

Baban Rafi Forest is the most significant area of woodland in the Maradi Department of Niger, a west African country on the southern edge of the Sahara Desert. These pictures show the loss of a significant fraction of the natural landscape (darker green areas) of the forest to agriculture. Population in this region quadrupled during the 40 years leading up to the 2007 image.

Colorado River Evolution, Mexico 

These two pictures illustrate the extremes of water flow in the Colorado River since measurements began in the late 1800s. The 1985 image was taken in the midst of record high flow, while the 2007 image shows the driest period. Excessive rains or severe droughts directly change the amount of water available in the Colorado River Basin, and so does the increasing pressure of human needs throughout the western states.

Helheim Glacier Melt, Greenland

Along the margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet, outlet glaciers flow as icy rivers through fjords and out to sea. These pictures show a fjord in which Helheim Glacier (on the left) is crumbling into large and small icebergs (light blue, on the right). The glacier outlet held steady from the 1970s until about 2001, then began to retreat toward its source about 4/7 miles between 2001 and 2005. The glacier’s flow to the sea has also sped up.

Drying Lake Poopó, Bolivia

Lake Poopó, Bolivia’s second-largest lake and an important fishing resource for local communities, has dried up once again because of a drought and diversion of water sources for mining and agriculture. The last time it dried was in 1994, after which it took several years for water to return and even longer for ecosystems to recover.

Flooding on the Ganges River, India

Heavy monsoon rains have caused catastrophic flooding along the Ganges and other rivers in eastern and central India. At least 300 people died and more than six million were affected by the flooding, according to news reports. These images show a stretch of the Ganges near Patna.

All of this knowledge about our home planet enables policy makers, government agencies and other stakeholders to make informed decisions on critical issues that occur all around the world. From rising sea levels to the changing availability of freshwater, we enable studies that unravel the complexities of our planet from the highest reaches of Earth’s atmosphere to its core.

To see the full ‘Images of Change’ gallery, visit: http://climate.nasa.gov/images-of-change

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

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Now, I don’t know about y'all, but I sure as hell didn’t come down from the goddamn Smoky Mountains, cross five thousand miles of water, fight my way through half of Sicily and jump out of a fuckin’ air-o-plane to teach the Nazis lessons in humanity. Nazi ain’t got no humanity.

Inglourious Basterds (2009) dir. Quentin Tarantino

spacious skies. deancas, 1.5k (ao3)

There are one hundred twenty-nine miles between one rest stop and the next.

Cas starts digging for change at mile one hundred twenty-eight. By the time they’ve hit the exit, he’s managed to collect a few scattered coins from the glove compartment. He holds his hand out across the seat expectantly. As they come to a stop, Dean digs a few quarters out of his pocket and drops them into Cas’ palm before he opens his door.

Cas rolls his neck as he gets out of the car and makes his way towards the vending machines tucked into an alcove between the bathrooms. Dean follows alongside him, hands in his pockets.

It’s only after Cas has inserted his quarters and plucked his soda from the slot that he pauses.

He stands with his drink in hand, looking at the building, the cars parked in front, the freeway a couple hundred feet away. For a dizzying moment, he wonders if he imagined the past two hours.

“This one’s different,” Dean says. “Last one had more trees and was farther back from the road. Less benches, too.”

Cas nods absently, looking around as he unscrews the bottle cap. Dean is right; it’s not quite the same. “And it didn’t have Mountain Dew.”

Dean chuckles softly. “Clearly this one is superior.” His smile fades as he watches Cas take a long drink, and he threatens, “If you’re really gonna down that whole thing right now, you better take a piss before we get back on the road.”

Cas smiles and puts the bottle to his lips, taking another swig as he looks out at the road. If he squints, he can see another rest stop on the westbound side. He hadn’t noticed it as they’d passed, but he knows exactly where he’d find the vending machines.

Keep reading

Wildflowers are in full bloom at the Pryor Mountain Wilderness Study Area! Located on the border of Wyoming and Montana, this scenic area’s rugged, isolated portions of the Pryor Mountain Range may be tough to get to but the view is worth it. Some areas are only accessible by ATV, horseback or on foot. In less than 13 miles, the landscape transitions through a wide spectrum of geologic and biotic features, ranging from desert environments to those found in sub-alpine mountainous settings. Opportunities for nature photography, rock climbing, hiking, backpacking, nature study, and scenic viewing are outstanding. Pryor Mountain is approximately nine miles north of Lovell, Wyoming. Before venturing into this wilderness study area, make sure to check in with the Bureau of Land Management’s Billings Field Office and grab a map. Photo by Bob Wick, Bureau of Land Management, @mypubliclands.

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Ted Bundy Victims - Washington State

Karen Lee Sparks (21) - 4325 8th Avenue NE, Seattle

Date : January 04, 1974

Ted battered Karen while she was asleep in her bed. She was found the following evening by her roommates. She suffered internal injuries and brain damages but she survived. (no picture available)

Karen’s room after the attack.

Linda Ann Healy (21) - 5517 12th Avenue NE, Seattle 

Date : February 01, 1974

Ted abducted her from her basement bedroom. Her skull was found on Taylor Mountain, 20 miles east of Seattle. Ted dismembered her head and took it home. Forensic indication : bludgeoned. Linda was the morning voice of radio listeners. Every morning she announced the ski conditions for the west Washington area.

Donna Gail Mason (19) - Evergreen State College, Olympia

Date : March 12, 1974

Donna disappeared between 7:00 pm and 8:00 pm that night as she was on her way to a jazz concert on campus. Her body was never found. Ted told Bob Keppel that he burned her skull to ashes in Liz’s fireplace.

Susan Elaine Rancourt (18) - Central Washington State College, Ellensburg

Date: April 17, 1974.

Ted abducted Susan around 10:00pm that night. She was on her way to a meeting at Munson Hall and was planning to see a German movie afterward. Her skull was found on Taylor Mountain.

Roberta Kathleen Parks (20) - Oregon State University Campus, Corvallis

Date : May 06, 1974

Ted abducted Roberta around 11:00pm that night. The circumstances of her abduction are unknown. Ted probably lured her to his car. Her skull was found on Taylor Mountain.

Brenda Carol Ball (22) - Flame Tavern, Burien

Date : June 01, 1974

Brenda was seen at the Flame Tavern by people who knew her where she stayed until closing time at 2:00 am. She was last seen on the parking lot speaking with a handsome brown-haired man who had his arm in a sling. Her skull was found on Taylor Mountain.

Georgeann Hawkins (18) - Seattle University District

Date : June 12, 1974

Georgeann was known as George by her friends and had a Spanish test coming up. That’s the informations Ted learned during the time Georgeann was in his car. Ted lured her by using a briefcase and some crutches. She agreed to help him carry his briefcase to his car, which she did. He then knocked her unconscious with the crowbar. He dumped her body at the Issaquah site.

Map drawn by Ted of her dump site.

The afterward of the murder.

Janice Ann Ott (24) - Lake Sammamish State Park

Date : July 14, 1974

Janice was a juvenile probation caseworker at the King County Juvenile Court in Seattle at the time of her disappearance. Ted was seen by multiple witnesses talking to Janice on the beach. She followed him willingly to his car to help him with his sailboat after asking him if there was room for her bike. Skeletal remains were found at the Issaquah site.

Newspapers articles related to her disappearance.

Denise Naslund (19) - Lake Sammamish State Park

Date : July 14, 1974

Denise was at the park with her boyfriend and a few friends that day. She was accosted by Ted to the toilet block only a few hours after Janice Ott abduction. She was last seen around 4:30 pm, leaving with a man. Remains were found at the Issaquah site.

Newspapers articles related to her disappearance.

Utah State Victims

Good Omens
Drunk
“I mean, d'you know what eternity is? There’s this big mountain, see, a mile high, at the end of the universe, and once every thousand years there’s this little bird-“

"What little bird?” said Aziraphale suspiciously.

“This little bird I’m talking about. And every thousand years-”

“The same bird every thousand years?”

Crowley hesitated. “Yeah,” he said.

“Bloody ancient bird, then.”

“Okay. And every thousand years this bird flies-”

“-limps-”
(I swear i was chanting not to make this look as shippable and I failed)

This is pretty cool, I’m thinking Insomnia for Alaska and Pearl Harbour for Hawaii.