mountain-gorilla

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Dian Fossey’s 82nd Birthday 

The leading authority of endangered gorillas would have turned 82 today (Jan 16) if it wasn’t for her untimely death in 1985. Dian Fossey worked in the tangled slopes of Rwanda studying mountain gorillas and developing a habituating process which was never done before. Louis Leakey sent her to the Congo in 1966 and began her conservation work by 1967 in Rwanda. She was the closest researcher to the gorillas than ever before. Her research camp was 9,000 feet up Mount Visoke and was her home and battleground for almost twenty years. She fought bravely for the lives of the mountain gorillas and put their safety and health before hers. She is an inspiration to all and to those who help save endangered animal lives.

Read her articles “The Imperiled Mountain Gorilla published in April 1981 and Making Friends With Mountain Gorillas published in January 1970.

Mountain Gorilla, Congo

Photograph by Michael Nichols

Of the many threats facing the endangered mountain gorilla, habitat loss is one of the most pressing. Trees in the Virunga range are often cut down for charcoal production. Here, a young mountain gorilla takes in the view from a tree branch in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

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These incredible pictures show the moment when unlucky wildlife photographer Christophe Courteau gets punched by a rowdy silverback mountain gorilla, who has become drunk after eating too many bamboo shoots.

Christophe was taking some snaps in the Volcanoes National Park, in Rwanda when Akarevuro(leader of the Kwitonda Group), a 250 kg alpha male, appears to take a dislike to being photographed. He can be seen clenching his fist before charging at the photographer who, amazingly, escaped with just a small scar on his forehead.

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Our own Dr, Oliver Ryder captured rare footage of wild baby gorillas playing in Rwanda. A cute reminder of the appeal of this endangered species and the importance of protecting them. (WARNING: Cute overload)

Mountain gorilla genome provides hope for animal’s future

Rescued as a 4-year-old from poachers in 2007, Kaboko was raised in a gorilla orphanage in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). He got sick and died at age 9, never having the opportunity to breed and help the mountain gorillas recover from the low numbers that threaten their existence. But with his blood and that of six others, researchers have now delved into the history and health status of these endangered animals and concluded their fate may be less dire than some have feared.

RWANDA, SABYINYO : A baby mountain Gorilla, member of the Agashya family, is pictured in the Sabyinyo Mountains of Rwanda on December 27, 2014. Rwanda, well known for mountain gorillas – an endangered species found only in the border areas between Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo – and hosted more than a million visitors between 2006-13, generating from the national parks alone $75m (£44m) in tourism revenue in that time; 85% of this is from trekkers who come to see some of the country’s 500 gorillas. AFP PHOTO / Ivan LIEMAN