motorism

Looking for New Blogs to Follow

Only like/reblog this post if you are cool and down with my byf

What I’m lookin’ for:

  • comics blogs
    • I love DC, so if you’re a DC blog let me know!
      • BATFAM
      • give this a pass if you post/reblog interfamily relationships or stuff with minors like damij*n
    • marvel
      • I love the X-Men, both Spider-Men, and I want to get more into the Black Panther stuff now that the movie’s coming out. Honestly I’m looking to get more info on stuff so just marvel in general is fine.
    • Indie comics
      • I love Motor Crush and always have my eye out for new comics to enjoy
  • Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood
    • I love those kids. But if you post ships, only canon ships. ABSOLUTELY NO R*YED!!!
      • I love parental Roy taking care of Ed but THAT. IS. IT.
  • Voltron
    • NO SHA//LADIN
  • Book blogs
    • YA and Adult fantasy and science fiction

If you’re a mutual, if you could reblog this to help me. My dash is dead cause I recently did a cleanse and I need to fill in the space. Need to follow some new peeps.

If you reblog, tag what you post!! Thanks!!! <3

Tennessee Ernie’s Steak ‘n’ Biscuits

“Down here we have all kinds of music and food. Why, I remember folks used to do things down in Bristol called ‘all day singin’ and dinner on the ground,’” Tennessee Ernie Ford fondly recalled in May 1971. “That meant gospel quartets – as many as five to 20 of 'em – and people would come from miles around just to listen and have dinner, sittin’ on the ground. Everybody brought baskets or boxes of food, marvelous things: whole baked hams or sliced ham on biscuits, homemade bread, hot buttered rolls, hard boiled or deviled eggs and chicken by the acre, fried or roasted, roast beef and ribs. And homemade ice cream, with the paddle removed, all packed and salted down, wrapped in gunny sacks. That was something’ great, somethin’ we ought to do again!”

Bless your pea pickin’ heart, Ern.

Over the years I’ve written extensively about Tennesee Ernie Ford; how my mother would sing me to sleep with “Shotgun Boogie” and how the smell of mama’s sourdough bread rising in the oven and Ernie’s smooth bass-baritone voice would intermingle in our farmhouse kitchen. Like Ernie music and food were integral parts of my daily life as a child. Food was never something I took for granted. Instead, I savored every bite of my mother and grandmother’s home-cooked meals. To this day there are few things I cherish more.

Over the past year, the subject of country music stars and their forays into the restaurant business have come up in conversations with friends repeatedly. From Minnie Pearl and Eddy Arnold’s fried chicken to Roy Rogers’ roast beef, Little Jimmy Dickens’ barbecue and Conway Twitty’s “Twitty Burger” just to name a few. In 1969, the Tennessee Pea Picker himself took the plunge into the business with Tennessee Ernie’s Steak 'n’ Biscuits.

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Jane: ‘And this is how you switch it on. No, don’t say it. I know this technology is outdated, it has been since 2007.’

Darcy: ‘It’s not like she hasn’t complained about it every five minutes since then.‘

For those who missed the other posts, this is my humble take on a Lego model of the Smith Motors movie set featured in @marvel’s first Thor movie. (a Marvel superhero movie about an alien arsehole prince who learns respect and tolerance by being forced to live as an illegal immigrant on planet Earth)

As construction nears completion, here’s a sneak peak of Jane Foster’s front lab with two telescopes, flatscreen monitors, something that is supposed to look like an oscillator, and whatever I could find in printed tiles to stick on Darcy’s pin board. The angled pillars were a challenge I wouldn’t want to repeat.

Bonus:

Jane: ‘Anakin, I’ve told you over and over: I did NOT keep any of your shirts!‘

We all know where those went.

View of a 1967 Mercury Cyclone coupe. Images of women’s faces are projected in background. Label on sleeve: “Ford Motor Co., Mercury Cyclone, 1967.”

  • Courtesy of the National Automotive History Collection, Detroit Public Library