mother and daughter quotes

The day I will finally rest is the day my daughter and her daughter are made of cosmos and chaos and everything you told me I could never be. Until then, I will be the oncoming storm over the horizon that you will always see. I am woman and war and you cannot stop me.
—  Nikita Gill

How to talk to your daughter about her body, step one: Don’t talk to your daughter about her body, except to teach her how it works.

Don’t say anything if she’s lost weight. Don’t say anything if she’s gained weight.

If you think your daughter’s body looks amazing, don’t say that. Here are some things you can say instead:

“You look so healthy!” is a great one.

Or how about, “You’re looking so strong.”

“I can see how happy you are — you’re glowing.”

Better yet, compliment her on something that has nothing to do with her body.

Don’t comment on other women’s bodies either. Nope. Not a single comment, not a nice one or a mean one.

Teach her about kindness towards others, but also kindness towards yourself.

Don’t you dare talk about how much you hate your body in front of your daughter, or talk about your new diet. In fact, don’t go on a diet in front of your daughter. Buy healthy food. Cook healthy meals. But don’t say, “I’m not eating carbs right now.” Your daughter should never think that carbs are evil, because shame over what you eat only leads to shame about yourself.

Encourage your daughter to run because it makes her feel less stressed. Encourage your daughter to climb mountains because there is nowhere better to explore your spirituality than the peak of the universe. Encourage your daughter to surf, or rock climb, or mountain bike because it scares her and that’s a good thing sometimes.

Help your daughter love soccer or rowing or hockey because sports make her a better leader and a more confident woman. Explain that no matter how old you get, you’ll never stop needing good teamwork. Never make her play a sport she isn’t absolutely in love with.

Prove to your daughter that women don’t need men to move their furniture.

Teach your daughter how to cook kale.

Teach your daughter how to bake chocolate cake made with six sticks of butter.

Pass on your own mom’s recipe for Christmas morning coffee cake. Pass on your love of being outside.

Maybe you and your daughter both have thick thighs or wide ribcages. It’s easy to hate these non-size zero body parts. Don’t. Tell your daughter that with her legs she can run a marathon if she wants to, and her ribcage is nothing but a carrying case for strong lungs. She can scream and she can sing and she can lift up the world, if she wants.

Remind your daughter that the best thing she can do with her body is to use it to mobilize her beautiful soul.

—  Sarah Koppelkam (x)
  • Harry: I don't know what you were thinking James.
  • James: That a broomride outside the yard over muggle london would be a hoot?
  • Harry: well you've awoken Godzilla now. So good luck.
  • James: [gulps]
  • Ginny: *whispers to her son his punishment whilst eerily calm*
  • [James runs out of the room with a look of anguish on his face]
  • Harry: Well we got outta that one, huh?
  • Ginny: Godzilla?
  • Harry: *scoffs* I know what I married.
  • Ginny: yeah... I take after my mom in so many ways....
youtube

First spoken word poem from my new youtube channel!

your mother is tired - 
she puts you to sleep,
your mother is sick - 
she makes you tea,
your mother is hungry - 
she makes your favourite meal,
your mother is sad - 
she hugs you so you feel better,
your mother is afraid,
she checks for monsters under your bed,
your mother is lost -
she helps you find your way;
your mother has always been there - 
she deserves love for more than a day.
—  marina v., every day you are alive is a day to thank your mom.
My mom has had a hard life
There always seems to be a rain cloud over her head
She always thinks she’s a loser
Because she’s not rich
Or because she doesn’t have the best job
And has always had to struggle with money
But she is one of the most nice, caring and hardworking people you’ll ever meet
We have the same type of job where we’ve worked with the same people
And every time they’ve worked with her
They come up to me as ask
“Is your mom so and so?”
And they always tell me how great she is
How sweet she is and how much she helped them at work
“She’s the best.” They’ll say
My grandpa also tells her that me and my brothers are good people
and a hardworking bunch
That we get that from her
That she raised great kids
And I see her eyes light up
To me
That is so much better and says a lot more about her
Than how much money she makes
She may have a rain cloud over her head
But I think some people are destined to be good people and great mothers
And she’s excelled at both of those things
—  Chapters from my life

How to talk to your daughter about her body.

Step One: Don’t talk to your daughter about her body, except to teach her how it works.

Don’t say anything if she’s lost weight. Don’t say anything if she’s gained weight.

If you think your daughter’s body looks amazing, don’t say that. Here are some things you can say instead:

“You look so healthy!” is a great one.

Or how about, “You’re looking so strong.”

“I can see how happy you are – you’re glowing.”

Better yet, compliment her on something that has nothing to do with her body.

Don’t comment on other women’s bodies either. Nope. Not a single comment, not a nice one or a mean one.

Teach her about kindness towards others, but also kindness towards yourself.

Don’t you dare talk about how much you hate your body in front of your daughter, or talk about your new diet. In fact, don’t go on a diet in front of your daughter. Buy healthy food. Cook healthy meals. But don’t say, “I’m not eating carbs right now.” Your daughter should never think that carbs are evil, because shame over what you eat only leads to shame about yourself.

Encourage your daughter to run because it makes her feel less stressed. Encourage your daughter to climb mountains because there is nowhere better to explore your spirituality than the peak of the universe. Encourage your daughter to surf, or rock climb, or mountain bike because it scares her and that’s a good thing sometimes.

Help your daughter love soccer or rowing or hockey because sports make her a better leader and a more confident woman. Explain that no matter how old you get, you’ll never stop needing good teamwork. Never make her play a sport she isn’t absolutely in love with.

Prove to your daughter that women don’t need men to move their furniture.

Teach your daughter how to cook kale.

Teach your daughter how to bake chocolate cake made with six sticks of butter.

Pass on your own mom’s recipe for Christmas morning coffee cake. Pass on your love of being outside.

Maybe you and your daughter both have thick thighs or wide ribcages. It’s easy to hate these non-size zero body parts. Don’t. Tell your daughter that with her legs she can run a marathon if she wants to, and her ribcage is nothing but a carrying case for strong lungs. She can scream and she can sing and she can lift up the world, if she wants.

Remind your daughter that the best thing she can do with her body is to use it to mobilize her beautiful soul.

—  Sarah Koppelkam
letter to my daughter
i do not know your name yet
i have not seen your face
i have not felt you move inside me
but i will someday
and when time comes 
i hope whoever makes your limbs 
with me 
appreciates that you are half a storm
that your skin may be as soft 
and sweet as a summer day
but that inside
you will always be pouring rain
—  pardis alia.