moth versions

In this version, Hamlet pulls Ophelia out.
She’s awake, in bloom, ripe with death.
Salt in her hair and rue in her eyes.
Her limbs aglow, rose-pink and healthy
but she goes anyway.
Ç’est la morte. Eaten up by moths.

In this version he loses her and knows it, too.
Hamlet curses the sky.
A sonnet dances at his lips.
A shy prayer to a soft-shell god.
(Good night, sweet lady. Good night.)
In time the mouth unlearns the name,
but never the face.
How lovely she always looked, but
they say she was lovelier in the water.

In this version, Ophelia’s ghost never visits.
They both perish and meet again
in New Denmark.
She is unrecognisable.
A new face in a dead city.
The streets are still graced with poison;
drenched in dementia,
but Hamlet and Ophelia
stroll down the same strand of madness.

In this version, Hamlet calls to Ophelia.
She greets him as you would
an estranged child:
holds his skull-cap in the lap
of her billowing dress,
and they watch Elsinore burn to the ground.
There’s no one left for them to haunt.

—  Suraya Kamal, Hamlet
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Have you got yourself a super cute Spooky Girl backpack yet?😘 We also have Spooky Boy and a super cute Goth Moth version~ 🦇👻🕷 bbtv.com/toxictears

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nytimes.com
Many of Florida’s Sea Turtle Nests Were Destroyed by Hurricane Irma
The storm obliterated nests during what scientists had hoped would be a record year for leatherback and green turtles.
By Karen Weintraub

A loggerhead turtle hatchling headed for the sea. Hurricane Irma wiped out large numbers of leatherback and loggerhead turtle nests in Florida last month, significantly denting this year’s projections for a healthy population. CreditGustavo Stahelin/University of Central Florida

A damaged and partially exposed nest, lower right, in the Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge after major erosion from Hurricane Irma. CreditGustavo Stahelin/University of Central Florida

Excerpt:

In addition to wiping out homes and businesses, Hurricane Irma swept away a large number of sea turtle nests as it tore across Florida last month.

The state is a center of sea turtle nesting, and this year was developing into a very encouraging year for the endangered leatherback turtles, the threatened loggerheads and green turtles, said Kate Mansfield, a marine scientist and sea turtle biologist at the University of Central Florida. The hurricane suddenly dashed those hopes.

An official statewide picture of the damage to sea turtles won’t be available until Nov. 30, because the nesting season runs through at least the end of this month, said Simona Ceriani, a research scientist with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. But it’s clear that nests in many areas of the state were destroyed by Irma, she said.

The northwest Atlantic region is one of the world’s two largest loggerhead nesting areas, and 89 percent of those animals are hatched in Florida, Dr. Ceriani said, citing a 2015 assessment.

At the Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge, just south of Cape Canaveral, more than half of the green turtle nests laid this season and a quarter of the loggerheads were lost as the storm tore up beaches, said Dr. Mansfield, whose program monitors turtles in the refuge.

Endangered leatherbacks lay their eggs earlier in the season, so none of their nests were lost in the refuge. Sea turtles, which take 25 to 30 years to reach reproductive age, lay their eggs in the open beach, under vegetation or at the base of a dune. The hurricane eroded key nesting beaches, washing away nests or flooding them with rainwater or seawater, Dr. Mansfield said. Along two stretches of beach south of Cape Canaveral, more than 90 percent of incubating loggerhead nests were destroyed by the storm, representing about 25 percent of the season’s total.

nytimes.com
Opinion | We Aren’t Built to Live in the Moment
What best distinguishes human beings from other animals is our foresight, as scientists are just beginning to recognize.
By Martin E. P. Seligman and John Tierney

By Martin E. P. Seligman and John Tierney

We are misnamed. We call ourselves Homo sapiens, the “wise man,” but that’s more of a boast than a description. What makes us wise? What sets us apart from other animals? Various answers have been proposed — language, tools, cooperation, culture, tasting bad to predators — but none is unique to humans.

What best distinguishes our species is an ability that scientists are just beginning to appreciate: We contemplate the future. Our singular foresight created civilization and sustains society. It usually lifts our spirits, but it’s also the source of most depression and anxiety, whether we’re evaluating our own lives or worrying about the nation. Other animals have springtime rituals for educating the young, but only we subject them to “commencement” speeches grandly informing them that today is the first day of the rest of their lives.

A more apt name for our species would be Homo prospectus, because we thrive by considering our prospects. The power of prospection is what makes us wise. Looking into the future, consciously and unconsciously, is a central function of our large brain, as psychologists and neuroscientists have discovered — rather belatedly, because for the past century most researchers have assumed that we’re prisoners of the past and the present.

Behaviorists thought of animal learning as the ingraining of habit by repetition. Psychoanalysts believed that treating patients was a matter of unearthing and confronting the past. Even when cognitive psychology emerged, it focused on the past and present — on memory and perception.

(Excerpt please click link for the full article)

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[Images: Black-and-white lineart of a large moth; each of its wings are divided into four stripes, with hearts, diamonds, and spades on the top/upper wings and clubs on the lower/bottom wings. Each of the ace symbols has concentric lines radiating inwards. The pictures are identical except for the moths’ antennae; the first moth has thick, fluffy antennae, and the second moth has thin, sleek antennae.]

Ace Pride Moth coloring pages! …I did not mean to take so long to get to the next ones after posting the Bi Pride Moth version. The need for more ace positivity today inspired/reminded me, though, so up they’re going!

Aro Pride Moth is inked but not scanned, or I’d post it as well. Aro folks, I hope you will accept a virtual fistbump of solidarity in the meantime; I promise you’re not forgotten.

anonymous asked:

Hello may I ask something? Do you know how to recognise their voices? I have no one to ask so hopefully it's alright to ask.

I’ll do my best to explain, but it may be inaccurate and I apologise beforehand

Kihyun: he is the main vocal. he has a honey-like voice. It is really silky and smooth, but powerful (eg: Tiger Moth (Acoustic Version) - Shopaholic Louis OST) (Daeng Daeng Daeng- Supreme Team)

Shownu: he a mature rich voice, it sounds homely? but it’s really comforting (Now We know - Protect the Boss OST)

Wonho: Honestly I don’t know how to describe his voice, he can sing in different ways given the situation, a bit rock? (Big Bang- Sober)(Rain- Instead of Saying Goodbye)(Monsta X-Fighter)

Minhyuk: Deep and husky. his vocals are so good (Lyn- Only Yours + 10cm - I Really like you)

Hyungwon: He has a low voice, and sometimes sings as if he’s talking. He can sing higher notes but starship rarely lets him (Big Bang- Sober) (Monsta X- Be Quiet)

Jooheon: High-tone rapper, he raps aggressively in their title tracks. He has a really smooth singing voice too (Monsta X- Stuck)(Big Bang- If You)

I.M: Low-tone rapper. His voice is really deep and sexy (0 (Young) - Random Artists ft No Mercy)

I hope it helped!