mosquito-trap

Mosquito trap

With mosquito weather upon us and our wonderful little friends being carriers of several nasty things it would be good to have a method of trapping those little suckers. This works great, is inexpensive, and has no caustic chemicals that harm humans, pets, or plants.

Directions:

Cut a liter plastic bottle in two pieces at approximately 1/3 of the distance from the end of the threaded cap portion (remove cap if still on bottle).  The 1/3 portion will be used as a funnel.  Add about two cups of water to the 2/3 portion of the bottle. Add a tablespoon of yeast to the water as well as two teaspoons of brown sugar (white sugar can also be used but brown is better).  Stir the contents.  Place the funnel portion of the bottle as shown in the above photo on the left.  Make sure it seats tight in the larger portion.  If it doesn’t you can use packaging or duct tape to seal it tightly.  Make sure there is at least 1" between the top of the water and the bottom of the end of the treaded part of the 1/3 bottle portion.

Mosquitoes are drawn to the sweet ingredients within the mixture.  They fly down to get a drink and can’t find their way out and are trapped.  Eventually they tire of flying and drop into the water and die.  Empty and replenish as required. 

Make several to keep around your property and inside your dwelling.

Now all we need to do is get some people size and set them outside the White House and the Congress.  They definitely are too dumb to find their way out.

Love hertz

James Cook University researchers have found sex sells when it comes to luring male mosquitoes.

Senior Research Officer Brian Johnson and Professor Scott Ritchie set out to make a cheap and effective audio lure for scientists collecting male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes – the species that carries dengue and yellow fever.

They found a tone of precisely 484 Hertz, the frequency of a female Aedes aegypti’s wings, brought 95 percent of male mosquitoes to the trap.

Mr Johnson said the device cost around $20 and could be run by itself for weeks. “We started with a cheap mobile phone and moved to an even cheaper MP3 player. There are no harmonics, it’s a pure tone and very simple to produce.”

Brian J. Johnson, Scott A. Ritchie. The Siren’s Song: Exploitation of Female Flight Tones to Passively Capture MaleAedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). Journal of Medical Entomology, 2015; tjv165 DOI: 10.1093/jme/tjv165

Mosquito trap with sound-lure attached.Credit: Image courtesy of James Cook University

THEORY: Jurassic Park Was A Sham That Never Had Any Real Dinosaurs

The entire premise of Jurassic Park centers around the idea that geneticists were able to extract dinosaur DNA from prehistoric mosquitoes trapped in fossilized chunks of tree sap, which is impossible, because DNA has a half-life and would have decayed beyond any possible use after 65 million years. Plus, there’s no way you would find a mosquito who limited its blood intake to one particular species of dinosaur. There would be hundreds, if not thousands, of different DNA strands in each mosquito. Every DNA extraction would be like taking a cotton swab of a college freshman’s bedsheets.

So, the only way for Jurassic Park to get its hands on any dinosaurs would be to have their geneticists build them from scratch, which would explain why all the dinosaurs in the movie look like how we, the ignorant public, imagine dinosaurs look, as opposed to how they actually appeared in nature. For instance, in real life, a velociraptor was the size of a chimpanzee, whereas in Jurassic Park, velociraptors are large enough to play professional basketball. Also, they had feathers. Most dinosaurs probably had feathers. And the dilophosaurus, the tiny, spitting monster with a technicolor neck frill, was 10 feet tall, and the fossil record provides zero evidence of poison loogies or flashy throat accessories.

5 Horrifying Fan Theories That Make Way Too Much Sense

Homemade Mosquito Trap

Works on Gnats too!

Items needed:

1 cup of water

¼ cup of brown sugar

1 gram of yeast 

2-liter plastic bottle

DIRECTIONS:

1. Cut the plastic bottle in half.

2. Mix brown sugar with hot water. Let cool. When cold, pour in the bottom half of the bottle.

3. Add the yeast. No need to mix. It creates carbon dioxide, which attracts mosquitoes.

4. Place the funnel part, upside down, into the other half of the bottle, taping them together if desired.

5. Wrap the bottle with something black, leaving the top uncovered, and place it outside in an area away from your normal gathering area. (Mosquitoes are drawn to the color black or white.)

Change the solution every 2 weeks for continuous control.

2

Jurassic World director confirms how they obtained mosasaur DNA

Since it was first announced that the marine reptile mosasaurus will be appearing in Jurassic World, some have wondered if it would be explained how the film’s scientists obtained genetic material from such creatures. In the previous movies, it was established that dinosaur DNA was retrieved from mosquitoes trapped in amber that had once fed on dinosaur blood… but there aren’t mosquitoes underwater.

Today, Jurassic World director Colin Trevorrow provided an explanation, answering the question posed by a follower by posting a link to a news article about soft tissue and genetic material being discovered inside fossilized dinosaur bones themselves – no mosquito required.

This technique is briefly referenced in the original movie as well, and Crichton touched on it in the novel (Grant provided Hammond with fractured bone pieces for genetic testing in exchange for his funding), although at the time it was unknown if genetic material could reliably be obtained this way.

In the movie series, as in real life, it appears that the technology has advanced in the past 20-plus years, and InGen/Masrani are now able to retrieve paleo-DNA directly from fossil bones as well as the mosquito-in-amber method.

Modern technology has brought us many benefits, including mosquito traps that cost hundreds of dollars, but sometimes we overlook simple solutions to difficult challenges such as mosquito control. When it comes to controlling pests, research tends to focus on chemicals or concepts that can be patented. Unless someone can make a profit from an idea, the public may never become aware of it.

HOMEMADE MOSQUITO TRAP.

Items needed:

200 ml water
50 grams of brown sugar
1 gram of yeast
2-liter plastic bottle

Or US conversion:
1 cup of water
¼ cup of brown sugar

HOW:
1. Cut the plastic bottle in half.
2. Mix brown sugar with hot water. Let cool. When cold, pour in the bottom half of the bottle.
3. Add the yeast. No need to mix. It creates carbon dioxide, which attracts mosquitoes.
4. Place the funnel part, upside down, into the other half of the bottle, taping them together if desired.
5. Wrap the bottle with something black, leaving the top uncovered, and place it outside in an area away from your normal gathering area. (Mosquitoes are also drawn to the color black.)

Change the solution every 2 weeks for continuous control.

Homemade Mosquito Trap

Materials:
2 liter bottle
glue
1 tsp yeast
½ cup sugar
lukewarm water

Instructions:
Cut the top off a 2 liter bottle. Invert the cone and place it inside the straight part of the bottle. Glue the two pieces together. Add 1 tsp yeast and ½ cup sugar to some luke warm water, and pour the mixture into the bottle. Mosquitoes are attracted to the carbon dioxide that you exhale. The yeast feeds off the sugar and emits the same gas, so the mosquito enters the bottle, thinking it will find food there and is trapped.