moses-harris

gutenberg-e.org

Moses Harris, Prismatic colors, [1766] Mimicking the spread of light from a source, Harris places the pure colors at the center of his circle and the lightest at the outer edge. In the late 18th century, Moses Harris elaborated on the Newtonian color wheel by charting not only pure colors, but the various shades of those colors as well.

Moses Harris - Prismatic Colors, “The Natural System of Colors”, 1766.

Moses Harris’s chart was the first full-color circle. The 18 colors of his wheel were derived from what he then called the three ‘primitive’ colors: red, yellow and blue. At the center of the wheel, Harris showed that black is formed by the superimposition of these colors. Mimicking the spread of light from a source, Harris places the pure colors at the center of his circle and the lightest at the outer edge.

 Colour Theory | “At the same time, at various points it (London, National Gallery, Making Colour, until 7 September) touches on the question of how pigments have changed over time. Blues have become greener, or have almost entirely faded; greens have become brown or blue, reds have become pink and some yellows have disappeared; and several of the paintings on display have been chosen to illustrate this. Thus Niccolò di Buonaccorso’s 14th-century The Marriage of the Virgin originally included green trees in the background; the green was achieved by a layer of yellow over blue, but the yellow has now disappeared, leaving the trees entirely blue. Much later Gainsborough was able to use the more stable Naples yellow for a dress in the famous picture of his two daughters chasing a butterfly, and it has survived much better.

Color deterioration was not limited to paintings produced before the 19th century, as can be seen in some works by Van Gogh, who was often obliged to use cheap materials. What is displayed on the walls of galleries today inevitably looks different from the way it looked when it left the artist’s studio, even without taking into account the vexed question of the types of varnish that were used in the past and the way they’ve changed over time. How conscious artists were of these irreversible changes is unclear. ….” Charles Hope’s full review at LRB

Moses Harris (c. 1730 - c. 1788)
Etching, hand colored, signed in the plate lower right, 
From: The Natural System of Colours Wherein is displayed the regular and beautiful Order and Arrangement, Arising from the Three Primitives, Red, Blue, and Yellow, The manner in which each Colour is formed, and its Composition, The Dependance they have on each other, and by their Harmonious Connections Are produced the Teints, or Colours, of every Object in the Creation, And those Teints, tho’ so numerous as 660, are all comprised in Thirty Three Terms
London [c.1785 ?], pl.[2]



The first colour wheel

English entomologist and engraver Moses Harris (1730-1788) devised the first full-colour wheel in 1766, creating the foundation of modern colour theory.

“The 18 colours of his wheel were derived from what he then called the three ‘primitive’ colours: red, yellow and blue. At the center of the wheel, Harris showed that black is formed by the superimposition of these colours.”

Aurelian is an archaic word for lepidopterist, person who is interested in butterflies. It is also a title of one of the most famous book ” The Aurelian ” written and illustrated by Moses Harris in 1766.  Harris, in his book presented on the beautiful coloured plates full life cycle of British butterflies, showing with precision how female lay eggs, the developmental stages of the caterpillar and chrysalis from side and down part. Book also contain different type of insects collecting and what is the most important for this period, methods of butterfly breeding.

Personally think This book Is Work of Art, the Masterpiece of lithography. It’s actually my big dream to own one this book.

Something amusing

In 1995, the film “Moses” was shown on television. It featured Christopher Lee as Ramses, the father of Merneptah who is the Pharaoh of the Exodus.

Fast forward three years to “Prince of Egypt” where we have Ralph Fiennes voicing Ramses as the Pharaoh of the Exodus.

And look at who those two actors are famous for playing.

Saruman and Voldemort! One of the greatest leaders in all of Afro-Eurasia has been portrayed by actors who went on to play evil wizards. Amusing? Of course!