morocco & spain

6

Behind them lay the makeshift campgrounds where they had spent months living rough, waiting for the right moment to climb the six-metre, razorwire fence lying between them and their dream of making it to Europe. In front of them lay an immaculately groomed golf course complete with white-clad golfers teeing off.

The two radically different realities, just metres apart, was what greeted a dozen or so migrants caught on the triple fence that marks the border between Spain’s north African enclave of Melilla and Morocco on Wednesday. After 200 had tried to scale the fence, Spain’s interior ministry said 20 people had made it to the enclave and another 70 remained perched on top of the fence for several hours.

instagram

Space Station flight from a clear North Africa over a story Mediterranean

8

FIFA World Cup 2018 — Groups

Group A - Russia (host) / Uruguay / Egypt / Saudi Arabia 
Group B - Portugal / Spain / Iran / Morocco
Group C - France / Peru / Denmark / Australia
Group D - Argentina / Croatia / Iceland / Nigeria
Group E - Brazil / Switzerland / Costa Rica / Serbia
Group F - Germany / Mexico / Sweden / South Korea
Group G - Belgium / England / Tunisia / Panama
Group H - Poland / Colombia / Senegal / Japan

10

Iftar: Breaking of the fast 2014

(photos from left to right)

1. Syrian refugee family waiting to break their fast, top, and their meal, bottom, during the holy month of Ramadan, next to the Temporary Centre for Immigrants in the Spanish enclave of Melilla, Spain. (Santi Palacios/AP Photo)

2. An Iraqi family waiting to break their fast, top, and their meal, bottom, during the holy month of Ramadan in Baghdad, Iraq. (Karim Kadim/AP Photo)

3. A Sudanese family waiting to break their fast, top, and their meal, bottom, during the holy month of Ramadan on the outskirts of Khartoum, Sudan. (Abd Raouf/AP Photo)

4.  Malaysian Muslim family waiting to break their fast, top, and their meal, bottom, during the holy month of Ramadan in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. (Vincent Thian/AP Photo)

5. The Hammami family waiting to break their fast, top, and their meal, bottom, during the holy month of Ramadan in the Bardo neighborhood near the Tunisian capital, Tunis.(Aimen Zine/AP Photo)

6. The Aazzab family waiting to break their fast, top, and their meal, bottom, during the holy month of Ramadan in Casablanca, Morocco.(Abdeljalil Bounhar/AP Photo)

7.  A family waiting to break their fast, top, and their meal, bottom, during the holy month of Ramadan in Sydney, Australia. (Rob Griffith/AP Photo)

8.  An Iranian Muslim family waiting to break their fast, top, and their meal, bottom, during the holy month of Ramadan in Tehran, Iran. (Vahid Salemi/AP Photo)

9. A family waiting to break their fast, top, and their meal, bottom, during the holy month of Ramadan in Istanbul, Turkey.(Emrah Gurel/AP Photo)

10.A family waiting to break their fast, top, and their meal, bottom, during the holy month of Ramadan in Nairobi, Kenya. (Sayyid Azim/AP Photo)

Barefoot in Spain

Migrants drink water as they sit on Spanish soil after jumping a metallic fence that divides Morocco and the Spanish enclave of Melilla. Spain says around 700 African migrants have rushed the barbed wire border fences and although police repelled most, 140 managed to enter Spanish territory. (Fernando Garcia/AP)

Soar beyond the ocean veil
Explore lands, I shall prevail.

Cruise beside nature’s complexion
Listen to earth’s rhythm section

Stand in awe of towering waterfalls
Peacefully let go of life’s pitfalls

Feel the crunch of glacial till
Under my boots that won’t stand still

Hike atop a Hawaiian volcano
Adrenaline fears to see gray snow

Sway along with a charming breeze
Ireland’s cliffs must be the bees knees

Allow ocean waves to scoop me up
In the salty sea as the moon wakes up

Canyons and craters, forests and more
The world beckons me to explore

theguardian.com
Cities should be studied as evolutionary hotspots, says biologist
Animals and birds evolve more quickly in urban environments than in remote habitats, Cheltenham science festival is told
By Hannah Devlin

Foxes loitering around rubbish bins and pigeons roosting in train stations: urban animals are widely regarded as the dregs of the natural world.

However, according to biologist Simon Watt, cities represent some of the world’s hotspots for evolution and behavioural adaptation. Speaking at the Cheltenham science festival, Watt, who is founder of the Ugly Animal Preservation Society, said: “The ice caps are melting, the rainforest is shrinking, the one environment that is growing is cities. If we’re going to look for evolutionary shifts right now in our world, the place to look is cities.”

In his talk, Watt cited a host of examples of how the urban environment is prompting new genetic shifts and unexpected behaviours. A proportion of black cap warblers, which used to migrate to Morocco or southern Spain, have shifted their route to Britain where urban heat islands and garden bird feeders allow them to survive at more northerly latitudes than was previously possible.

“The ones that come to Britain are starting to get shorter wings – better for manoeuvrability, worse for long flights – and longer beaks, which are better to get through the wee bars of garden bird feeders, although worse for things like fruits and berries.”

Birds in cities often sing at a higher pitch, perhaps to be better heard against higher levels of background noise. Photograph: Sue Tranter RSPB Images/PA Wire