morning-after-pill

anonymous asked:

Me & my bf had sex the other day & the condom split. So he came inside me. I went to the toilet & peed most of it out. Im not on the pill so we went staright to get the emergency pill. I took it & ive been scared since that what if it didnt work :/x

You did the right thing getting the morning after pill! I had to do the same thing when I was with my ex, it’s the most frustrating situation ever because you were actually using protection and doing the right thing! I understand your concern. Don’t forget that the morning after prevents 95% of pregnancies if taken within 24 hours of having sex, so the odds are in your favour! As a comparison, condoms are only 98% effective… Unless you are experiencing any kind of symptoms that you might be pregnant, I wouldn’t worry about it,  although it might be a good idea to take a pregnancy test just to put your mind to rest! Also, I’d recommend looking into other forms of contraception. After it happened to me, I got the implant (more than 99% effective), but I still use condoms so my chances of getting pregnant are super low, and I’m still being protected from STIs. 

Previously, the pill required a prescription for girls aged 16 or under. In 2011, Health and Human Services secretary Kathleen Sebelius made a controversial move, blocking an FDA recommendation that the pill be available over-the-counter to anyone.

All of the new Oklahoma laws aimed at limiting abortion and contraception are great for the Republican family that lives in a gingerbread house with a two-car garage, two planned kids and a dog. In the real world, they are less than perfect…yet I cannot convince my Republican colleagues that one of the best ways to eliminate abortions is to ensure access to contraception.
—  Doug Cox, a Republican state legislator and practicing physician, in an op-ed today. “Denying access to [the morning-after pill] is a sure way to increase legal and back-alley abortions,” Cox wrote. “Moreover, such a law would discriminate against low-income women who depend on Medicaid for their health care.” Oklahoma Republicans have proposed several draconian restrictions on abortion and contraception; while Cox opposes abortion, he’s been honored by Planned Parenthood for defending a woman’s right to contraception and “effectively argu[ing] against more than 160 anti-women’s health measures.” source
How soon after sex will I know if I'm pregnant?

Someone asked:

How soon after sex will I know if I’m pregnant?

Good question! A lot of people don’t know this: you don’t actually get pregnant during sex or even right after. It can take up to six days for the sperm and egg to join and form a fertilized egg. Then, it takes 6-10 days for the fertilized egg to completely implant itself in the lining of the uterus. Pregnancy begins during implantation when the hormone needed to support pregnancy is released. That hormone is called the human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (HCG). Pregnancy tests work by detecting it.

This is why emergency contraception is possible  – and why it’s so great that it exists! Emergency contraception (a.k.a. Plan B or the so-called “morning-after” pill) can be taken up to five days after unprotected sex to prevent pregnancy.In a way, it should really be called the “up to a few mornings after” pill. 

As for when you’ll know you’re pregnant, most people start to figure it out when they miss their period. Most over-the-counter pregnancy tests start being accurate around then – the first day of your missed period.

-Mary at Planned Parenthood

 

AfterPill is the first emergency contraception to be sold exclusively online. The company offers one dose of EC for $20, plus a $5 flat-rate shipping fee, making it roughly half the price of Plan B One-Step.

WOO! This is great news. Hopefully other brands will take note, especially brands effective for bigger patients.

Myth or Fact

Emergency contraception causes abortions. 

MYTH- 

Emergency contraception prevents pregnancy from occurring in the first place by blocking fertilization of the egg and subsequent implantation in the uterus; it does not, and cannot, induce abortions. 

Bre, Masakhane Program Development Intern