morana

Marzanna (in Polish), Morė (in Lithuanian), Morana (in Czech,Slovene and Croatian), or Morena (in Slovak and Russian) or also Mara, Maržena,Moréna, Mora or Marmora is a Baltic and Slavic goddess associated with seasonal rites based on the idea of death and rebirth of nature. She is often described as a demon and is associated with death, winter and nightmares. In Slavic rites the death of Marzanna towards the end of winter is juxtaposed against the birth of Jarilo – a Slavic god representing the coming of spring. (source: wikipedia)

Slavic mythology: Morana, the Goddess of Death and Winter

All things must die and she provides their endings. When the time comes, she crushes the soft petals of blooming flowers and infects them with decay. She breathes frost into their green veins and watches them wither under the weight of her ice. Everything dies and she is the end. She is the winter whiteness and the chill of the December darkness. Her beauty is black, her touch fatal. And she is necessary, for without her to remind us of it, life would not be truly appeciated. She is death, yet she gives life wings. She is Morana, the Goddess of Death and Winter.

2

Mythology Aesthetics → Marzanna

Marzanna (in Polish), Morė (in Lithuanian), Morana (in Czech, Slovene, Serbian, and Croatian), or Morena (in Slovak and Russian), or also Mara, Maržena, Moréna, Mora, or Marmora is a Baltic and Slavic goddess associated with seasonal rites based on the idea of death and rebirth of nature. She is often described as a demon and is associated with death, winter, and nightmares. In Slavic rites the death of Marzanna towards the end of winter is juxtaposed against the birth of Jarilo – a Slavic god representing the coming of spring. 

Jarilo & Morena

Here’s the story of Jarilo and Morena:

In Slovakian folklore, Jarilo is the god of war, vegetation, fertility, spring, and the harvest. Morena is the goddess of the harvest, witchcraft, winter, and death. Jarilo is associated with the moon and Morena is considered a daughter of the sun. Both of them are children of Perun (the god of thunder and lightning).

They are born on the night of the new year, but Jarilo is snatched from the cradle and taken to the underworld, where Veles (god of the underworld) raises him as his own. At the spring festival, Jarilo returns from the world of the dead, bringing springtime from the ever-green underworld into the realm of the living. He meets his sister Morena and courts her. At the beginning of summer, they are married. This sacred union between brother and sister (children of the supreme god) brings fertility and abundance to earth, ensuring a bountiful harvest. And, since Jarilo was raised by Veles and his wife is the daughter of Perun, their marriage brings peace between two great gods and ensures there will be no storms to damage the harvest.

After the harvest, however, Jarilo makes a bad choice. He is unfaithful to his wife, and Morena vengefully slays him. His death returns him to the underworld. Without her husband, Morena — and all of nature with her — withers and freezes in the upcoming winter. She turns into a terrible, old, and dangerous goddess of darkness and frost, and eventually dies by the end of the year.

The whole story repeats itself anew each year. There is always a fresh springtime, followed by summer, autumn, and winter.

2

Slavic mythology marzanna

Marzanna (sometimes Morana or Morenais a Baltic and Slavic goddess associated with seasonal rites based on the idea of death and rebirth of nature. She is often described as a demon and is associated with death, winter and nightmares. In Slavic rites the death of Marzanna towards the end of winter is juxtaposed against the birth of Jarilo – a Slavic god representing the coming of spring. (x)

when you first
laid your eyes
upon his vernal grace
you knew it.
he wasn’t meant for you.

when you first
met him
and returned his warm smile
your knees were shaking
(it was the first time in years you felt something)
and yet
you knew it.
he wasn’t meant for you.

when you first
sat by his side under a tree
and his fingers traveled amongst your locks of hair
he looked at you
and you saw spring blooming in his eyes
but your very own eyes had winter
the cold, killer, merciless winter.
you knew it.
he wasn’t meant for you.

he wasn’t meant for you
because he was too pure
too lively
too alive
to be ruined by you.
you were a savage force of nature
a grim goddess of death
you were too cruel to taint him with your twisted love
(and you still are).

in your wedding day
everyone seemed happy
except for you.
you were delighted to spend the whole time by his side
but you still knew it.
he wasn’t meant for you.
you would be his damnation.

and when he fell by your feet
with a trail of blood falling over his lips
and life fading from his core
you were expecting it
you knew
sooner or later
you would destroy him
but you still wept
you still cursed yourself
for he loved you
and you loved him
but he wasn’t meant for you.
he never was.

—  love, too, can be destructive; l.t.

So uh.

From now on il be posting more paper sketches then colored digital stuff. The main reason im doing this is because id like to improve my general drawing and sketching skills and its hard to focus on that when alot of my drawing time is taken up by working on digital pieces. I think il post more digital stuff once i get myself a cintiq, since it’ll be easier to practice traditional with that, since its practically drawing traditionally.

ON A MORE POSITIVE NOTE. Im working on a character for my upcoming webcomic! So heres a sneak peak ;)

slavic mythology asks
  • Perun: the sky tears open with thunder - are you scared or are you one with the storm?
  • Veles: someone breaks a promise that meant everything to you - what do you do?
  • Jarilo: the spring came and with it the memories - which spring do you remember best and why?
  • Morana: the time of your death has come but you are given a choice - how do you want to go?
  • Mokosh: a plant grows on your grave after you die, carrying a piece of your soul - what plant would it be?
  • Svarog: summer's sun burns your skin and breaks your heart - which summer do you regret the most?
  • Zorja Utrennjaja: you open your eyes to the delicate light of dawn - what is the first thing you think about?
  • Zorja Vechernjaja: the sky is dark and the air sweet - what pleasure do you long for?
  • Leshy: you walk through a forest filled with whispers and hungry eyes - do you stray from the path?
  • Baba Yaga: the night is heavy and bitter - what is the worst nightmare you ever had?
  • Topielec: you wade in water on a quiet evening - is it a lake, a river, or maybe sea?
  • Żmij: you see before you a creature of hundred eyes and sly smiles - do you banish it or befriend it?
youtube

na volačej streše holubienka nese
{at someone’s roof a dove is sitting}
tak ona hrkuta morenu nam pyta
{and it is cooing and asking for our morena}

my si ju nedame až o velkej noci
{we won’t give her until the easter day}
bude sa vydavat fialkovem venci…
{she will wed in violet wreath…}

“Slovak folk song Morena sung by children in Western Slovak dialect (which is less soft than official language based on Central Slovak dialect). Morena is Slavic pagan Goddess of Death and Winter and feast Burning of Morena is one of the most celebrated feast days in Slovakia nowadays.”

3

EASTERN EUROPEAN/BALTIC MYTHOLOGY MEME > relationships [1/5]: jarilo and morana

Jarilo and Morana are the gods of spring and winter in Slavic Mythology, respectively. Every year, by the end of February, Jarilo was kidnapped by his father’s enemy, Veles, and taken to the Underworld. With the advent of spring, Jarilo returned from the underworld, that is, bringing spring and fertility to the land. The first of the gods to notice Jarilo’s return to the living world was Morana. The two of them would fall in love and court each other through a series of traditional, established rituals, imitated in various Slavic courting or wedding customs. This sacred union of Jarilo and Morana, deities of vegetation and of nature, assured abundance, fertility and blessing to the earth, and also brought temporary peace between two major Slavic gods, Perun and Veles, signifying heaven and underworld. Thus, all mythical prerequisites were met for a bountiful and blessed harvest that would come in late summer. However, since Jarilo’s life was ultimately tied to the vegetative cycle of the cereals, after the harvest (which was ritually seen as a murder of crops), Jarilo also met his death. The myth explained this by the fact that he was unfaithful to his wife, and so she kills him in retribution. Without her husband, however, Morana turns into a frustrated old hag, a terrible and dangerous goddess of death, frost and upcoming winter, and eventually dies by the end of the year. At the beginning of the next year, both she and Jarilo are born again, and the entire myth starts anew.

EASTERN EUROPEAN/BALTIC MYTHOLOGY MEME > slavic gods and goddesses [4/9]: morana

Morana is a Baltic and Slavic goddess associated with seasonal rites based on the idea of death and rebirth of nature. She is associated with death, winter and nightmares. Morana was the first goddess to witness the god of spring’s return, Jarilo, from the underworld to the realm of the living. They later got married, assuring a time of peace, prosperity and fertility to the crops. However, after the harvest, Jarilo also met his death: the myth explains that he was unfaithful to Morana and then she killed him. Without her husband, she turned into an old, frustrated hag, and also died at the end of the year. At the beginning of the next year, both Morana and Jarilo are born again and the whole myth starts anew.