moon

Tonight’s Full Moon will be a SuperMoon. The SuperMoon not only affects nature such as the tides and wildlife it also affects us, our emotions will be heightened, our senses will be sharp, things that were hidden or in the shadows can now be seen. The August Full Moon is known as the Sturgeon Moon because this was the time when wild sturgeon and Salmon would be hunted in the rivers, it is also known as the Corn Moon as this is a time of the corn harvests.

If you have been feeling stuck in a situation or that everything has been standing still lately, get ready because this Full Moon will be bringing with it a wind of change. The whole of earth is going through a massive transition at the minute, Summer is fading and Autumn is coming in, leaves are starting to change colour and falling from trees, plants and flowers are dying and seeding the earth for next Spring. But at the same time crops in fields are flourishing with the harvest, fruit is now at it’s most ripest. We will feel this energy of transformation, we should use it to help transform ourselves into what we want to be.

The Full Moon is in the constellation of Pisces. The time is potent to follow our hearts to create new pathways. There is a simultaneous shedding and emerging as we focus to ground our visions into form. Some deep emotional changes are happening as well so we must move with the changes, allow what wants to come forth, and trust our inner knowing and guidance.

Your enthusiasm, idealism and creativity could be at an all-time high. You could be bursting with new ideas. You could have sudden insights. You can move from breakdown to breakthrough. You are experiencing a transformation in consciousness.

Sometimes your growth can feel weird and strange when you are no longer connecting to your past. But truly, the old way of living no longer works for you. You are experiencing new aspects of yourself and life. You are giving birth to the new you, and giving birth is painful. This is real work. This is real growth. There is so much to celebrate right now. Realize that to live out new, promising visions there’s a need to restructure. A new vision of the future will be illuminated, it is up to you what you do with it.

Most of all tonight’s SuperMoon will be about healing, let the waves of Pisces psychic energy wash over you, cleansing you of negative thoughts and feelings, let go of the past and welcome in the future. This is the harvest and it is time to start reaping what we have sown, your hard work will start paying off. Take the gifts life offers you and make the most of them.

Have a Blessed Full Moon, May the Goddess watch over you.

Seasonal Moon Meanings

January: The Old Moon – Amid the cold and deep snows of midwinter, the wolf packs howled hungrily outside of villages. Thus, the name for January’s full Moon. Most commonly know as Full Wolf Moon, or the Moon After Yule.

February: The Storm Moon –  Since the heaviest snow usually falls during this month, native tribes of the north and east most often called February’s full moon the Full Snow Moon. Some tribes also referred to this moon as the Full Hunger Moon, since harsh weather conditions in their areas made hunting very difficult.

March: The Sugar Moon – As the temperature begins to warm and the ground begins to thaw, earthworm casts appear, heralding the return of the robins. It marks the time of tapping maple trees. To the settlers, it was also known as the Lenten Moon, and was considered to be the last full moon of winter.

April: The Growing Moon – This name came from the herb moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the earliest widespread flowers of the spring. It’s a time when things begin to grow.

May: The Flower Moon – Flowers spring forth in abundance this month. Some Algonquin tribes knew this full moon as the Corn Planting Moon or the Milk Moon.

June: The Honey Moon – The Algonquin tribes knew this moon as a time to gather ripening strawberries.

July: The Mead Moon – July is normally the month when the new antlers of buck deer push out of their foreheads in coatings of velvety fur.

August: The Lighting Moon – The sturgeon of the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain were most readily caught during this full Moon. Others called it the Green Corn Moon or the Grain Moon.

September: The Fruit Moon – This full moon corresponds with the time of harvesting corn. It is also called the Barley Moon, because it is the time to harvest and thresh the ripened barley. The Harvest Moon is the full moon nearest the autumnal equinox, which can occur in September or October and is bright enough to allow finishing all the harvest chores.

October: The Travel Moon – This is the month when the leaves are falling and the game is fattened. Now is the time for hunting and laying in a store of provisions for the long winter ahead.

November: The Frost Moon full moon in November, also know as the Full Beaver Moon, and was known as the time to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm winter furs.

December: The Winter Moon – This is the month when the winter cold fastens its grip and the nights become long and dark. This full moon is also called the Long Nights Moon by some Native American tribes.

SOURCE: