month!

I’ve been toying with the idea for a long time that some of the things Yuuri says, especially in the first couple episodes, are not exactly the truth and should be looked into farther. Honestly, we knew Yuuri was unreliable the moment the show opened–he referred to himself as “dime-a-dozen,” when he is literally the only male skater certified by the JSF within canonverse. 

And he made it to the GPF, you know? He’s one of the top 6 skaters in the world, right off the bat! It took us a few episodes to understand Yuuri’s character to realize the context of these statements, but we figured out pretty early on that Yuuri is the embodiment of Unreliable Narrator™. Especially after ep10, jfc. 

Anyway, why I’m bringing this up is because Kubo seemed to confirm a little theory of mine I’ve had stewing for a while and I wanted to share it with you.

So. Episode 1. The commemorative photo scene. 

I wanna first establish that this scene took place before the banquet. During the series run, sometime just afterwards, and occasionally even now there’s debate over when that scene took place. It wouldn’t make sense to happen after the banquet because they’re not only still wearing the team jackets, but they’re also wearing passes

The outside sign has information about the competition 

and Victor is talking to Yuri about his routines

which he probably wouldn’t do if it was up to a day later. 

We know how the rest of the scene goes. Victor seems to not recognize Yuuri at all, mistakes him for a fan, asks if he wants a photo, and then Yuuri leaves, thoroughly humiliated. Or, at least, that’s Yuuri’s version of what happened. I think generally everything that was said got said, all the movements and series of events were the same, but the implications of the offer were different. 

I have multiple anxiety disorders. When I remember something that I felt was a misstep or caused embarrassment, I always remember it slightly off. A person’s tone is more mocking or condescending, my reaction is worse than it was. There’s a lot of shame when it comes to anxiety and your mind immediately assumes you’re viewed to be–and are–on a lower pedestal than everyone else. Yuuri, clearly, has severe anxiety, so I don’t think it’s much of a stretch to think that, since this is from his perspective, maybe reality is a bit different than what he is able to give us. 

Anyway, my thoughts had no basis, so I’ve kept them to myself, but then Kubo came out and said this:

and then the fanbase lit up in flames because Victor know Yuuri was a fan before the banquet. But this also implies one thing I got super excited about: Victor has seen him skate, before the commemorative photo scene. 

meaning that everyone’s preconception that Victor mistook Yuuri for a fan has been completely blown out of the water. 

So, why would Victor ask him about a photo then? 

I think it’s important to keep in mind that Victor likes to make people feel good about their abilities. He likes teaching others, and he likes motivating them too. He gets pleasure out of seeing people rise to their potential. 

Although he’s flighty and kind of an airhead, and tends to ignore what he doesn’t find interesting, I don’t think Victor would ignore the scorings or the competitors landing below 3rd place. Victor clearly knew that Yuuri fell to last place, hard. This is just speculation, but maybe Yuri mentioned to Victor the incident with Yuuri crying in the bathroom. Or, perhaps Victor had already seen the press about Yuuri: he’s notorious for losing his nerve during competitions and failing to meet his potential. When Yuuri goes down, he tends to crash and burn. 

(also honda’s words imply yuuri usually performs very well)

Victor likes making people happy and better versions of themselves. Now he’s faced with the competitor who fell to last place, staring at him a few feet away. A competitor who is known for his anxiety and tendency to shy away from others. A competitor who just so happens to be a fan. So, what is Victor to do to help Yuuri feel better, or even open up a bit?

Initiate conversation. Try to reel him in to interacting with an open, non-threatening question and a tried-and-true welcoming smile. 

“Commemorative Photo?”

Victor didn’t mistake Yuuri for a non-competing fan, he knew who Yuuri was and was just trying his best to make Yuuri feel better. Victor, as we’ve seen throughout the series, resorts to giving comfort through action rather than words first and foremost. Unfortunately for him, this is not what Yuuri needs. 

It backfired. But I think Victor had good intentions. They were strangers so it’s not like Victor could just walk up and start a motivating speech. He tried to invite Yuuri to talk to him, someone Yuuri looked up to, and maybe they could talk and Victor could brighten his day? 

Victor wasn’t very tactile, and Yuuri didn’t stand his ground and identify himself, so they got nowhere with that. 

I’m so glad Kubo said this. This face looks like a combination of surprise and disappointment, perhaps not only in Yuuri rejecting him but also in himself for not being able to help.

and this face 

looks more concerned and surprised that Yuuri showed rather than like “oh shit, he’s a competitor.”

Poor Yuuri. Poor Victor. They really need to communicate better. 

4

Black history month day 21: desegregation poster child Ruby Bridges.

Ruby Nell Bridges Hall was born September 8, 1954 in Tylertown, Mississippi. She is best known for being the first black child to desegregate the all-white William Frantz Elementary School in Louisiana during the New Orleans school desegregation crisis in 1960.

The Bridges family moved to Mississippi when Ruby was four. When she was six, her parents responded to a proposal from the NAACP to participate in the integration of the New Orleans school system, despite hesitation from her father.

Bridges was one of six black children in New Orleans to pass the test that determined whether they could go to the all-white school, William Frantz Elementary. Two of the six decided to stay at their old school, and the other three were transferred to another district to integrate a different school, so Bridges went to William Frantz by herself. She and her mother had to be escorted to school by four federal marshals during her first year. One of the marshals later remarked: “She showed a lot of courage. She never cried. She didn’t whimper. She just marched along like a little soldier, and we’re all very very proud of her.”

Though Bridges showed remarkable bravery for a six-year-old, situation was certainly not without its challenges. The marshals would only allow her to eat food brought from her home due to one woman’s repeated threats to poison her. Another woman stuck a black baby doll in a wooden coffin and held outside the school in protest. Bridges said later that that frightened her more than any of the things they shouted. She began the practice of praying while she walked, which helped her block out the nasty comments, and she also saw a child psychiatrist named Robert Coles who helped her cope. Only one teacher, Barbara Henry, agreed to teach Ruby and did so for over a year, teaching as though she was teaching the whole class.

Bridges still lives in New Orleans with her husband, Malcolm Hall, and their four sons. She is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation, formed in 1999 to promote “the values of tolerance, respect, and appreciation of all differences”. In describing the mission of her foundation, Bridges stated: “racism is a grown-up disease and we must stop using our children to spread it.”

“Memphis Minnie”  by Kay Robinson

Lizzie Douglas (June 3, 1897 – August 6, 1973), known as Memphis Minnie, was a blues guitarist, vocalist, and songwriter whose recording career lasted from the 1920s to the 1950s. She recorded around 200 songs, some of the best-known being “Bumble Bee”, “Nothing in Rambling”, and “Me and My Chauffeur Blues”.

huffingtonpost.com
35 Queens Of Black History Who Deserve Much More Glory
Let's not forget about these trailblazing women this Black History Month.

“Black history lessons in classrooms shouldn’t be limited to the names of men and only a few women, especially when there are countless women who’ve made enormous strides for the black community. 

 The revolutionary words Angela Davis spoke, the record-breaking feats of Wilma Rudolph and the glass ceiling-shattering efforts of Shirley Chisholm paved the way for black women and girls across the country to dream big and act courageously. 

Here are 35 phenomenal women everyone should acquaint themselves with this Black History Month. 

Read the list here

So I’m sitting here (crying) after that episode and a thought occurred to me.

Why would Aida want to keep Fitz and Simmons apart in the framework? She’s seen how happy they make each other yeah?

But then it occurred to me

Every bad thing that has happened to Fitz is because Jemma convinced him to go into the field with her back all those years ago. 

So I’m calling it now. The Framework world is a place where Fitz wasn’t with Jemma on the BUS and so she died because he wasn’t there to help her cure the alien virus in FZZT

She jumped off of the plane and there is no body in that grave. The virus ended with her, but not in the way it was meant to. 

And as for Fitz, I’m thinking that his father never walked out on him. He entered the private sector, probably works for him, and that’s why that scene of him was like that. 

They probably have never met in this timeline and I’m dying

We’re celebrating another LGBTQ influencer for #BlackHistoryMonth!

Laverne Cox became the first openly transgender person to be nominated for a Primetime Emmy for her iconic role as our favorite hairdresser with a troubled past on Orange is the New Black. Since her big break on Netflix, she has been regarded as one of the most influential people in the trans community, and continues to fight for gender equality. We love you, Laverne!

tell the boy on the left thanks for not killing the boy on the right  ✌