money challenges

2

Witchsona commission for roseminer.

boardgames/roses/money witch + flying squirrel familiar

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Violet Chachki’s dollar store outfit - made entirely out of jump rope, plastic bags, and duct tape - for her Season 7 RuPaul’s Drag Race audition tape! (x)

SATURN: TOUGH LOVE

Saturn is that one planet that can make people cringe, or beam with adoring eyes. But anybody who’s studied astrology can tell you that Saturn is one of the most important planets in astrology. Saturn represents many things in a natal chart:

  • Your father - Saturn can tell you various qualities about your father through your sign, and especially house placement and aspects!
  • Challenges in life - Where Saturn is located shows where you will have challenges in your life. The sign can also give insight, but it is often generational. The challenges you face due to Saturn are also karmic. Saturn wants to teach you something in this life because you probably didn’t do so well in a past life.
  • Radical change - Every 30 years, Saturn returns to ruin your life teach you a very important life lesson and to rebuild your life to have a fresh start. This lesson is called your Saturn Return. It is said to mostly affect the house your Saturn is in. Saturn Returns are known to be painful, but also life-changing in a good way.
  • Seriousness - The house, in other words, the area of life your Saturn is in is the house where you will take very seriously. This seriousness can also manifest quite literally! Saturn can also show the responsible side of even the most immature individual!

So how does Saturn exactly affect your natal chart? Saturn can affect you in the following ways according to the house it’s in:

1st House: Your father will be significant in establishing your identity. You could have issues figuring out who you are, and this is a serious issue for you. You could look serious literally and take on qualities of a Capricorn Rising - quiet, reserved, and responsible. Those with Saturn in the 1st House can be seen as intimidating and put-together.

2nd House: Your father will greatly affect your finances which can manifest in many ways. He could also be very significant in your self-worth. Money and values is something you take very seriously. You could also have challenges with money. Those with Saturn in the 2nd can be seen as stingy, but you’re thrifty and responsible with your money.

3rd House: Your father will greatly significant in how you think and communicate with others. People could find you intimidating when you talk. Your siblings could have Saturn/Capricorn influences. You may face struggles with your inner thoughts, and you take them seriously. Those with Saturn in the 3rd like to have serious discussions.

4th House: Your father will be very important in your family life. Your family and upbringing will be very important to you. You may face struggles within your family. You may have had to take on responsibilities in your family. Those with Saturn in the 4th House may have grown up in a cold, harsh environment that very much represents the outside world.

5th House: Your father will be very significant in your hobbies, children, and perhaps your casual dating life. You tend to have a serious outlook on your interests and you can even push those interests away to finish your work rather than have fun and play. Those with Saturn in the 5th could have fathers who’ve had multiple affairs.

6th House: Your father will be important in your everyday life, health, and work. You tend to take your health and work seriously, but you also tend to overwork. Perhaps you put too many things on your plate. You could struggle with your health. Those with Saturn in the 6th House tend to be very disciplined with their habits.

7th House: Your father will be significant in the relationships you have. Those with Saturn in the 7th tend to go for a person who has qualities of their father. You will also take your relationships seriously, but you will also struggle to find a relationship that will work for you. People with Saturn in the 7th House usually marry later in life.

8th House: Your father will be significant in the major life changes you will go through in life. You tend to be serious about topics that are shoved under the rug such as sex, life/death, and more. Those with Saturn in the 8th can struggle going through major changes in life. You tend to be serious handling any joint finances with others.

9th House: Your father could be significant in your beliefs and education perhaps, but he could also be busy, constantly traveling. With Saturn in the 9th House, you tend to struggle finding a belief system that works right for you. You are very serious about your beliefs, and you’re quite responsible when you’re traveling far from home.

10th House: Your father could strongly affect how you see the world, your image, and your career. Those with Saturn in the 10th House tend to be successful later in life. You want to be seen as a very serious, responsible person, and you could try to find positions of power in your job. You want to be independent and practical in the world.

11th House: Your father could be strongly involved in a community or is very involved in the betterment of humanity. In your circle of friends, you may be seen as the responsible, intimidating one, the person to go to for the “serious” things. You could struggle with finding your true friends and the right community, or you could struggle learning to be a good friend.

12th House: Your father could’ve been absent, which can manifest literally, or maybe in parenting. It also implies an abusive use of substances. With Saturn in the 12th, people in public could struggle taking you seriously. You are only truly serious when you’re by yourself or when you’re vulnerable. You tend to like working behind the scenes.

some notes i’ve been taking on DMing, culled from various sources

Plot & Campaign:

  • Don’t think of yourself as being “against” the players. They aren’t playing “against” you. They are playing against the world and situations you pose to them, but you should be on their side.
  • Similarly, don’t think of the campaign as “your” story that you are telling to the players. It is a story that you are telling together. They affect the outcome of it as much (or more) than you do. If the players find a way to ruin your carefully crafted plot, let it go. You have to accept not getting your own way all the time the same way that the players do.
  • That said, have contingency plans in case the PCs kill or ignore your plot hook, find a way to bypass your carefully created puzzle, or successfully charm your final boss into not attacking them.
  • Use up your most fantastic ideas - don’t hoard them for later. You never know how long a campaign will last, and you might never get to those cool scenes and setpieces you were saving.
  • Utilize recurring NPCs. It’s less work for you and gives the players someone familiar to look forward to seeing (or resent intensely.)
  • Give the players a nemesis - someone or something working against their efforts, even if that is not a “villain” per se.
  • Have descriptions ready for locations and NPCs, but don’t over-describe. Give them enough details to build a sense of atmosphere without requiring them to draw the scene.
  • Have a set of possible random events ready to go, and periodically roll to see if any of them happen, to keep your players (and you!) on your toes.

Rules & Rolls:

  • Like in improv theatre, go for the “yes and” (or “yes but”) response to a player’s idea rather than a “no.” If the rules don’t specifically ban a player from doing something, let them do it. If it’s especially game-breaking and stupid, this is a great time to say “yes, but” and come up with a fun consequence.
  • Don’t stop everything to look up a rule. If you can’t find or figure out the answer within a minute, tell the players how you’ll do it this time based on your best guess and look it up for the future. Alternatively, if you aren’t sure what the rule would be for what a player proposes, just let them roll a d20 and add a relevant modifier to it versus your best estimate of difficulty level.
  • Don’t assume that a failed check means “nothing happens.” Failures can be as eventful, interesting, and story-driving as successes.
  • Calculating small currency amounts, weight encumbrances, and rations is incredibly boring for everyone. Decide ahead of time whether you want to just ditch those elements (within reason - if you are being kind to the players by not making them weigh out every item in their inventory, they should be kind to you by not claiming they are carrying a whole refrigerator.)

Rewards:

  • Pay attention to what motivates your players most (treasure, money, challenging fights, puzzles, stories) and use that to guide your campaign ideas. Let them tell you what carrot will lead them through the plot.
  • Make a note of what your players mention wanting out of the game experience (a certain kind of adventure or scene, an item) and find an opportunity to reward them with it.
  • Come up with a set of treasure/advanced weapons/other loot-ish rewards specific to each player. Whenever they are dungeoncrawling or getting rewards, roll to see which items they receive at that time.

Players:

  • Provide opportunities every session, if possible, for each character to use their skillset and playstyle, so that they don’t feel like the sidekick in someone else’s adventure.
  • Encourage the players to make themselves a “battle sheet” in addition to their standard character sheet that lists all their skills and spells (in their own words) and how it works, so that they understand their own potential and remember to use them! You are there to help them out if they aren’t sure of a mechanic, but encourage them to take ownership of their own character’s abilities.
  • Cliffhangers aren’t actually great ways to end a session (in case the campaign stalls out there, or a player drops out), but you can end with a new situation arising or a hard question to ponder, giving the players something to think about and look forward to returning to for the next session. 
  • Pay attention to the players’ welfare and condition as much (or more) than to their characters. If they are stressed, unhappy, or angry about something in the adventure (or something another player is doing), you should be ready to moderate that as much as you would moderate an in-game rule.
8

30 days movie challenge ↠ [17/30] the best movie i saw during the last year
            ⤷ now you see me 2 (2016) dir. john m. chu

A magician’s greatest power lies forever shrouded in his empty fist. And the very idea that he can convince the world that he is, in fact, carrying with him a secret.

Challenging your Husband's decisions.

All couples disagree and have arguments. I usually defer to my Husband’s final word, but in the rare times when I find myself becoming frustrated and wanting to challenge him, I take a look around at all the things I have because of him. Children, happiness, laughter, a home, money, food, my car, my clothes, the freedom to do whatever I want during the day, pretty much my whole life as I know it.

This reminds me that he is the reason why I live the life that I do and taking care of our family is my whole world. Challenging his authority does nothing positive for our marriage. After I quietly think about it in that way, I usually feel silly for even being upset in the first place. ❣️

anonymous asked:

ANDREW ACCIDENTALLY CALLING NEIL CUTE IN FRONT OF THE FOXES P L E A S E

IT IS OFFICIALLY MY SEMESTER BREAK!!!!!! ajfhdajkhfdajh this is the best prompt EVER let me have this self-indulgent headcanon

  • the foxes, because they like a.) challenges and b.) making money out of these challenges, get the idea to play Andreil Trope Bingo
  • nicky starts it, purely out of boredom, as well as out of the desire to spite kevin for being too exy-focused even if the season’s over
  • he creates a card with things like “andrew buying food for neil” “neil smiling behind andrew’s back” “one talking about the other when the other is not there” “andrew hurting someone for neil” “rooftop date” “andreil going late to practice together”
  • after the whole team making edits to the bingo card, a copy is given to everyone
  • word gets around, but as andrew and neil are two of the most oblivious people in the world, they don’t catch wind of it
  • eventually, everybody (including wymack and bee) gets in on it, because the pot rises to be two grand (can you guys believe? two fucking grand for a couple’s trope bingo)
  • they make it a race of sorts - as andrew and neil aren’t normally affectionate in public (neil being the more touchy of the two, but still severely lacking in comparison to the stereotype of Normal Couples), they all have to be there at certain times of the day
  • dan clearly established the “no fishing rule” at the start but some of them can’t help themselves - they’re just really lucky sometimes
  • renee is the first to check “andrew wearing one of neil’s shirts” after she notices at their weekly sparring session
  • aaron (unluckily enough) gets the first shot at “andreil making out by the lockers” after his shift to tidy up the court
  • nicky is first witness at “one being lowkey possessive over the other” when he catches a glimpse of andrew frowning down someone at the bar for checking out neil
  • at the end of it all, they’re all left with one box blank
  • “andrew calling neil cute”
  • and everybody is just ??????
  • because andrew would never do that. not in a million years
  • only neil seems like the type to do so - but even neil hasn’t said anything of the sort
  • everybody’s panicking because they’re all so close yet so far away
  • fast forward; it’s been a little over a month since everyone’s only got that last box blank, and they’ve all been fishing
  • matt has asked, on multiple occasions, what andrew thought of neil when he smiled
  • allison has pointed out how good neil looked when she gave him her last haircut
  • bee even got ahold of neil’s baby pictures and showed them to andrew on a visit of his
  • wymack, at some point, tried asking if “cute” was really the specific word they all needed to hear (”What if he says ‘adorable’? You know Minyard gets all wordy at some point.”)
  • they all flail around for another week until the foxes’ weekly movie night
  • it happens on a thursday at neil and andrew’s room, because it was their turn
  • everyone is seated around the television, either on armchairs, the sofa, or on beanbags
  • neil coughs and pounds his chest
  • andrew gets up from the sofa so fast and gets neil a glass of water
  • upon getting the glass, neil goes “Ah.That was just a test. Thanks for putting in the effort.”
  • neil is smirking and all, thinking he’s so clever, the cheeky bastard
  • and no one is prepared for andrew’s “Mmm. That’s cute. Move over.”
  • everybody is suddenly scrambling for their cards in their pockets
  • IT’S LIFE OR DEATH AT THIS POINT, PEOPLE
  • THAT LAST BOX IS ALL THAT M A T T E R S
  • nicky is like “Shit shit shit shit shit shit–”
  • kevin frustratingly goes “Where the fuck is my pen–”
  • bee is like “That’s unfair, I didn’t bring my card!”
  • it’s dan-the-legend-wilds that gets to cross out the box first and she yells (half-drunkenly) “BingobingobingobingoBINGO MOTHERFUCKERS!!”
  • matt’s like “Babe we’re going halfsies on that right–” while allison yells “THAT”S GOING INTO OUR NAIL POLISH FUND!”
  • wymack is in the moment and is like “Dan, you’re sharing with me, or you’re out of the fucking team.”
  • renee is groaning and shaking her head while aaron is just shrugging and texting katelyn he lost
  • in the midst of the chaos and debating-who-got-it-first is andrew and neil, clueless as fuck, staring at them all and at one another
  • neil is blinking in confusion while andrew is stony-faced
  • they go out of the room and leave the madness that is the foxes coming up with another bet and searching for money in their wallets

hydrosolhoe  asked:

What are some of your strict budget tips?

  •  The 50/30/20 rule is a good place to start if you don’t know much about budgeting; that is, 50% of your earnings is necessities, 30% is your wants and 20% is debt reduction and savings. 
  • Use money-managing apps such as Pocketbook
  • Sell things you don’t use or need.
  • Go through your closet and pick out what you don’t wear and possibly sell it or donate it.
  • Buying things secondhand is a good option; things lose their price value as soon as it has left the store.
  • Less is more.
  • Make a wish list of things you want. But leave it there for a while and come back to it within a few weeks. When you come back to it, decide if you still really want/need that item when you first wrote it. 
  • Meal prep. It saves you a lot of money.
  • Go to fresh food markets to buy groceries.
  • When you cook food, always cook a bit more so you have left overs for the next few days.
  • Cut up and freeze your vegetables to prevent them going off and wasting money.
  • Follow and listen to podcasts. Many of the minimalist ones will often discuss money-related issues. 
  • Trouble saving money? Try the 52-week money challenge; start from putting away $1 and each week it goes up one dollar until you reach $52. By the end of the year, you will have saved $1,378.
  • Read blogs, too! One of my favourite and helpful articles on money saving tips is this one called Pearls of money wisdom for twenty-something year olds.
  • Make debt repayments a priority but it’s always good to have savings in case of any accidents and as a back up, e.g. your car breaks down, you need to fly across country for an emergency etc. 
  • Remember what you’re saving for.
  • Avoid credit cards.
  • Carry and pay things with cash. You’re less likely to spend money if it’s bigger notes and you’re physically seeing how much money you’re spending.