molinella(bo)

Magick for Spring Time

❁ Do a ‘spring cleaning’ by cleaning and cleansing your whole house.  

❁ Do a ritual to welcome spring. 

❁ Begin devoting your time to learning, reading, and writing about your craft.  

❁ Use divination to determine your goals and outcomes for the year. 

❁ Start your seeds inside.

❁ Spoil your houseplants by watering them, fertilizing them, and talking to             them. Add crystals to their pots. 

❁ Spend time outside noticing signs of springs return. 

❁ Change your altar to correspond with spring. 

❁ Collect rain water from spring showers.

❁ Collect flower blossoms to dry and press for your spells and grimoire.

❁ Collect spring stream water.

❁ Meditate in the greening grass.

❁ De-clutter your home to bring forth fresh, new energies.

❁ Plant wild flowers for the bees.

I meant to post this sooner but life seems to have gotten in the way. 

May the moon light your path!
Moonlight Academy

2

Don’t screw with this gang (૭ ఠ -ఠ)૭

I have so much love for all of the crows ♥
and I spend way too much time thinking up new SoC merchandise ;;; I really want a “Straight Outta Ketterdam” shirt for myself

Spring Time Legends & Lore

Hare

The Easter Bunny is of German origin. He shows up in 16th century literature as a deliverer of eggs, in his own way a springtime St. Nicholas bent on rewarding the good.

In Celtic mythology and folklore the hare has links to the mysterious Otherworld of the supernatural.

The Celts believed that the goddess Eostre’s favourite animal and attendant spirit was the hare.

Many Buddhist and Hindu texts describe the hare as a creature of fire, but not just any fire, the same consuming sacrificial fire of the phoenix, then to rise again out of the ashes.

To the Romans, the hare is an emblem of fertility, abundance, sexuality, lust, rampant growth and excess.

Eggs

Eggs have forever been associated with spring time. Ancient Egyptians, Persians, Romans, Gauls, and Chinese all embraced the egg as a symbol of the universe. 

Druids buried eggs dyed red, the color of menstrual blood, in freshly plowed fields to draw the goddess of spring from her slumber and to ensure abundance and fertility for the year.  

In Egypt and Persia eggs were decorated at the beginning of the year. The decorated eggs were exchanged at the equinox, the eggs symbolizing creation and fertility. 

Early humans thought the return of the sun from winter darkness was an annual miracle, and saw the egg as a natural wonder and proof of the renewal of life.

As Christianity spread, the egg was adopted as a symbol of Christ’s resurrection from the tomb. Hardboiled eggs were dyed red in memory of Christ’s blood, then given to children as a talisman to preserve their health over the ensuing twelve months.  

Pace eggs are kept year-round in British households for luck.

The protective qualities of the scarlet-dyed egg are still invoked in parts of Europe to guard fields and vineyards from lightning and hail, one is usually buried on the property for that purpose

According to European superstition, once an egg is consumed, its shell must be broken up lest a witch use it to gain power over the person who ate from it. A witch might also make a boat from an intact shell, then set sail in it and wreck ships at sea. Discarded eggshells should never be burned because doing so will cause the hens to cease to lay. 

Spring Deities

Anglo-Saxons worshiped Eostre, the moon Goddess of spring and fertility. 

The Druids worshiped Blodeuwedd, the Goddess of fertility, magick, and dawn.

In Roman mythology, Flora is the goddess of flowers and of the season of spring.

The Ancient Greek goddess Persephone is associated with spring.  

The celtic Goddess Brigit is honored at the festival of Imbolc which celebrates the first stirrings of Spring.

Freya is the Nordic fertility Goddess associated with spring growth and flowers. 

Spring Flora

Clover and other three-leaved plants were once considered spring gifts from the fairies to protect us and bring us luck.

Easter Lilies symbolize purity and spring time.

Other Wives tales

An old wives tale says  a wind that blows on Easter Day will continue to blow throughout the year, and that a shower of rain promises a good crop of grass but little hay. 

Children born on Easter Day are deemed especially fortunate. Those born on Good Friday, however, are doomed to be unlucky. 

References: motherearthliving.com, snopes.com, irishabroad.com, druidicdawn.org


May the moon light your path!

Moonlight Academy

10

“But, CEO, I’m curious about something. I mean, for someone like you who’s always so concious about his health and feels like the world resolves around him, why did you get stabbed instead? It was a mistake and you slipped, right?”

No.

“Then did you really get stabbed on purpose?”

Yes.

“Why?”

Grimoire/BoS ideas for the beginning witch

None of these are set in stone. It’s your grimoire, and you can do what you want with it. This is just to get you started.

1. Make a blessing page for your book.

2. Write a simple spell. It can be something really simple, such as a spell to get a good night’s sleep. 

3. If you have deities or other entities you work with regularly, dedicate a page to each.

4. Write a page about what sort of witch you are and want to be and what you want to accomplish with your craft.

5. Write down any rules of your craft, whether they’re personal or widely accepted by your path.

6. Have a page defining what magick means to you.

7. Write a little bit about some paths you don’t personally follow, but are interested in.

8. Sketch some tarot spreads.

9. Make a list of some of your main beliefs.

10. Make a color correspondents page.

11. Draw some altar ideas.

12. Write “yes” and “no” on two different sides of a page as a pendulum board.

Add more, please! :)