moka house

anonymous asked:

maybe a dumb and uninteresting question, but what is a traditional Italian breakfast consist of? ^^

Here I am, Anon, sorry for the late reply! And your question is not dumb at all so never be afraid of asking! :D

IT WILL BE A LONG REPLY, I AM SORRY!!!

Well, generally speaking, the Italian breakfast is sweet. We don’t eat savory stuff for breakfast, and for an Italian it’s really hard to understand how people from other countries can eat things like eggs, bacon, sausages and mushrooms, in the morning.

We usually drink espresso coffee or its variations (like cappuccino or latte). Some people drink tea or just milk, some others prefer fruit juices, tho.

We make our espresso with our faithful Moka. Every Italian house has at least one of these.

External image

We can have cereals with milk, a slice of bread with Nutella or with butter and jam, croissants, cakes, cookies… Anything we like, as long as it’s sweet. (Sometimes I put Nutella on a slice of focaccia because I really like the contrast between savory and sweet, but not everybody likes it)

Then, if we want to go deeper, every region or even every town has its “traditional” breakfast.

Up in the north, in Trentino-Alto Adige, a region that less than a century ago was still part of Austria, someone may have a more continental-ish breakfast, with cheese, ham, speck, eggs and similar. My grandpa was born there and when he wants to treat himself he buys some pancetta (Italian bacon) and fries it along with eggs, for breakfast. But it doesn’t happen too often.

In Milan we usually have cappuccio e brioche (cappuccino and croissant - the orange juice is optional). There are a lot of variations of the croissant. They can be empty or have jam, cream, chocolate or honey inside. People from Milan don’t really sit at a table but eat while standing next to the counter. Because we are always in a hurry and don’t have time to waste!

During the fifteen summers I spent in Tuscany, in the morning I used to eat frati fritti (literally “fried friars”… beautiful, I know). They are like big doughnuts, deep fried and with a lot of sugar sprinkled over them. A mystical experience.

They should be pretty popular in Sardinia too but I have never been there so I can’t tell.

In Sicily they eat granita e brioche (not sure what the right word is… Slush… maybe. Like a Slurpee but a bazillionth times better and it can be made with coffee or strawberries. It has cream on top and it’s usually eaten with a typical Sicilian croissant.)

In Turin they have the Bicerin (literally “small glass”), made with espresso coffee, dark chocolate and cream. It’s really good!

External image

In Naples the coffee is traditionally made with a particular coffee maker, called Napoletana (because it was invented in Naples, duh!)

We don’t have things like Starbucks, in Italy, and the take-away coffee isn’t something we do. So we usually have breakfast at home, during weekdays, and go to the Bar (Coffee shop) on Saturday or Sunday mornings. But if there’s a bar really close to our workplace then we can go there and have a coffee before going to work (I used to have a lot of second breakfasts, when I was working in Italy, thanks to the amazing croissants the bar next to my workplace had!)

AND THIS IS WHAT I CAN TELL YOU FROM MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE! Sorry it’s such a long post, I just kept thinking of food and things to add! I hope this reply satisfies your curiosity, Anon!

IF ANY OF MY ITALIAN FELLOWS WANT TO ADD SOMETHING or point out some dumb things I wrote, then please do it! THE WORLD MUST KNOW HOW OBSESSED WITH FOOD WE ARE!!!