modrons

The Wheel of the Year

The Wheel of the Year is an annual cycle of seasonal festivals, observed by many modern Pagans. It consists of either four or eight festivals: either the solstices and equinoxes, known as the “quarter days”, or the four midpoints between, known as the “cross quarter days”.

The festivals celebrated by differing sects of modern Paganism can vary considerably in name and date. Observing the cycle of the seasons has been important to many people, both ancient and modern, and many contemporary Pagan festivals are based to varying degrees on folk traditions.

In many traditions of modern Pagan cosmology, all things are considered to be cyclical, with time as a perpetual cycle of growth and retreat tied to the Sun’s annual death and rebirth.

Yule/Winter Solstice: a festival observed by the historical Germanic peoples, later undergoing Christian reformulation resulting in the now better-known Christmastide. A celebration the beginning of longer days, as this is the shortest day of the year in terms of sunlight. 

Imbolc: the first cross-quarter day following Midwinter this day falls on the first of February and traditionally marks the first stirrings of spring. It is time for purification and spring cleaning in anticipation of the year’s new life. 

For Celtic pagans, the festival is dedicated to the goddess Brigid, daughter of The Dagda and one of the Tuatha Dé Danann.

Among witches reclaiming tradition, this is the  time for pledges and dedications for the coming year.

Ostara/Spring Equinox: from this point on, days are longer than the nights. Many mythologies, regard this as the time of rebirth or return for vegetation gods and celebrate the spring equinox as a time of great fertility.

Germanic pagans dedicate the holiday to their fertility goddess, Ostara. She is notably associated with the symbols of the hare and egg. Her Teutonic name may be etymological ancestor of the words east and Easter.

Beltrane: traditionally the first day of summer in Ireland, in Rome the earliest celebrations appeared in pre-Christian times with the festival of Flora, the Roman goddess of flowers, and the Walpurgis Night celebrations of the Germanic countries. 

Since the Christianization of Europe, a more secular version of the festival has continued in Europe and America. In this form, it is well known for maypole dancing and the crowning of the Queen of the May.

Litha/Summer Solstice: one of the four solar holidays, and is considered the turning point at which summer reaches its height and the sun shines longest.

Luchnassad/Lammas: It is marked the holiday by baking a figure of the god in bread and eating it, to symbolize the sanctity and importance of the harvest. Celebrations vary, as not all Pagans are Wiccans.  

The name Lammas (contraction of loaf mass) implies it is an agrarian-based festival and feast of thanksgiving for grain and bread, which symbolizes the first fruits of the harvest. Christian festivals may incorporate elements from the Pagan Ritual.

Mabon/Autumn Equinox: a Pagan ritual of thanksgiving for the fruits of the earth and a recognition of the need to share them to secure the blessings of the Goddess and the God during the coming winter months. The name Mabon was coined by Aidan Kelly around 1970 as a reference to Mabon ap Modron, a character from Welsh mythology. Among the sabbats, it is the second of the three Pagan harvest festivals, preceded by Lammas / Lughnasadh and followed by Samhain.

Samhain: considered by some as a time to celebrate the lives of those who have passed on, and it often involves paying respect to ancestors, family members, elders of the faith, friends, pets, and other loved ones who have died. In some rituals the spirits of the departed are invited to attend the festivities. It is seen as a festival of darkness, which is balanced at the opposite point of the wheel by the festival of Beltane, which is celebrated as a festival of light and fertility.

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Last minute modron miniatures for tomorrow’s game. Unfortunately don’t have time to paint them up, but they’ll do in a pinch. 

I’ve always loved modrons, not so much for their roots in D&D and Planescape, but for their general weirdness. They look like a 3rd grader’s doodle that someone turned into a monster, and their “unrealness” is equally adorable as it is unnerving. 

Mabon - A Small Guide

This week is Mabon! For all Witches, and with any sabbath, it’s a fun time to celebrate. So, I figured I’d put together a little guide for Mabon.

Mabon is also known as the Autumnal Equinox, when Night and Day are equal with each other. With Mabon, we all take a moment to pay our respects to the impending darkness. The Druids call this celebration, Mea'n Fo'mhair, and honor the The Green Man, the God of the Forest, by offering libations to trees. Offerings of ciders, wines, herbs and fertilizer are appropriate at this time. Wiccans celebrate the aging Goddess as she passes from Mother to Crone, and her consort the God as he prepares for death and re-birth.

At this festival it is appropriate to wear all of your finery and dine and celebrate in a lavish setting. It is the drawing to and of family as we prepare for the winding down of the year at Samhain. It is a time to finish old business as we ready for a period of rest, relaxation, and reflection.


Symbolism of Mabon:
Second Harvest, the Mysteries, Equality and Balance.

Symbols of Mabon:
wine, gourds, pine cones, acorns, grains, corn, apples, pomegranates, vines such as ivy, dried seeds, and horns of plenty.

Herbs of Maybon:
Acorn, benzoin, ferns, grains, honeysuckle, marigold, milkweed, myrrh, passionflower, rose, sage, solomon’s seal, tobacco, thistle, and vegetables.

Foods of Mabon:
Breads, nuts, apples, pomegranates, and vegetables such as potatoes, carrots, and onions.

Incense of Mabon:
Autumn Blend-benzoin, myrrh, and sage.

Colors of Mabon:
Red, orange, russet, maroon, brown, and gold.

Stones of Mabon:
Sapphire, lapis lazuli, and yellow agates.

Activities of Mabon:
Making wine, gathering dried herbs, plants, seeds and seed pods, walking in the woods, scattering offerings in harvested fields, offering libations to trees, adorning burial sites with leaves, acorns, and pine cones to honor those who have passed over.

Spellworkings of Mabon:
Protection, prosperity, security, and self-confidence. Also those of harmony and balance.

Deities of Mabon:
Goddesses-Modron, Morgan, Epona, Persephone, Pamona and the Muses. Gods-Mabon, Thoth, Thor, Hermes, and The Green Man.

Mabon is considered a time of the Mysteries. It is a time to honor Aging Deities and the Spirit World. Considered a time of balance, it is when we stop and relax and enjoy the fruits of our personal harvests, whether they be from toiling in our gardens, working at our jobs, raising our families, or just coping with the hussle-bussle of everyday life. May your Mabon be memorable, and your hearts and spirits be filled to overflowing!

“The Welsh say, “She is casting rain,” not “It is raining,” and in Pwyll’s day men still knew why.  Rain and sun, crops and wombs of beasts and women, all were ruled by that old, mysterious Goddess from whose own womb all things had come in the beginning. The wild places were Hers, and the wild things were Her children.  Men of the New Tribes, Pwyll’s proud golden warrior-kind, left her worship to women, made offerings only to their Man-Gods, who brought them battle and loot.  But now Pwyll began to wonder if those hunters were right who said that all who went in to the woods to slay her horned and furry children should first make offerings to Her, and promise not to kill to many.  So folk of the Old Tribes had always done.”

–excerpted from Prince of Annwn by Evangeline Walton

I’m working on a new piece of Goddess embroidery inspired by Evangeline Walton’s novelizations of The Mabinogian.  I just finished Prince of Annwyn in which the goddess Modron (Mother) is a primary character.

In the design I’m working on right now her head is a sun symbol, her torso is rain fall, and her skirt the sown field motif, symbolizing the fertility of both the fields and women.  From her head sprouts the Tree of Life.

Mabon Information!

Mabon is the second harvest festival in the Wheel of the Year, and it is celebrated on the Autumnal Equinox. Like you might expect from a harvest festival, it’s a time to gather with loved ones and be grateful for the good things that came your way this year. Also, since the equinox is when day and night are in equal duration, for some it’s a time to reflect on that balance.

“Mabon is a time to reflect on the previous year, when we can celebrate our successes (likened to bringing in the harvest) and assess which crops, projects, or dreams didn’t come to fruition.” 

•Who can celebrate Mabon?

Celebrating solstices, equinoxes, and cross-quarter days goes back centuries, although the concept of the Wheel of the Year is fairly new. That being said, we really have no right to say who can and can’t celebrate them, as long as they do so in a respectful and well-researched manner.

•How do I celebrate Mabon?

You can celebrate however feels right, but more common ways would be to decorate your altar (or your whole house!) with harvest-themed colors and objects, go apple picking/make applesauce, make a thanksgiving-esque meal with lots of fall foods, or simply take a few moments to reflect on your successes and failures this year.

•Symbolism of Mabon: 
Second Harvest, the Mysteries, Equality and Balance.

•Symbols of Mabon: 
wine, gourds, pine cones, acorns, grains, corn, apples, pomegranates, vines such as ivy, dried seeds, and horns of plenty.

•Herbs of Maybon: 
Acorn, benzoin, ferns, grains, honeysuckle, marigold, milkweed, myrrh, passionflower, rose, sage, solomon’s seal, tobacco, thistle, and vegetables.

•Foods of Mabon: 
Breads, nuts, apples, pomegranates, and vegetables such as potatoes, carrots, and onions.

•Incense of Mabon: 
Autumn Blend-benzoin, myrrh, and sage.

•Colors of Mabon: 
Red, orange, russet, maroon, brown, and gold.

•Stones of Mabon: 
Sapphire, lapis lazuli, and yellow agates.

•Activities of Mabon: 
Making wine, gathering dried herbs, plants, seeds and seed pods, walking in the woods, scattering offerings in harvested fields, offering libations to trees, adorning burial sites with leaves, acorns, and pine cones to honor those who have passed over.

•Spellworkings of Mabon: 
Protection, prosperity, security, and self-confidence. Also those of harmony and balance.

•Deities of Mabon: 
Goddesses-Modron, Morgan, Epona, Persephone, Pamona and the Muses. Gods-Mabon, Thoth, Thor, Hermes, and The Green Man.

•Things to do on Mabon:

http://baronesshydrangea.tumblr.com/post/150718481789/solitary-autumn-equinox

http://ofcloudsandstars.tumblr.com/post/149844308046/autumn-witchy-things-to-do

•How to get ready for Mabon:

http://flamekeeperwitch.tumblr.com/post/150701226649/setting-up-your-altar-there-are-many-ways-for-one

krazybomb  asked:

You know I'm surprised you didn't apply the normal construct rule of "does not need to eat, sleep, or breathe."

I was going to, but I noticed that it appears to be sort of an unspoken rule of thumb. For example, none of the golems in the Monster Manual have any notation about it, nor do the animated objects, homunculus, helmed horror, shield guardian, scarecrow, modrons, or other constructs. Thank you, though!

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And she’s finished … .

Previously Posted:

“The Welsh say, “She is casting rain,” not “It is raining,” and in Pwyll’s day men still knew why.  Rain and sun, crops and wombs of beasts and women, all were ruled by that old, mysterious Goddess from whose own womb all things had come in the beginning. The wild places were Hers, and the wild things were Her children.  Men of the New Tribes, Pwyll’s proud golden warrior-kind, left her worship to women, made offerings only to their Man-Gods, who brought them battle and loot.  But now Pwyll began to wonder if those hunters were right who said that all who went in to the woods to slay her horned and furry children should first make offerings to Her, and promise not to kill to many.  So folk of the Old Tribes had always done.”

–excerpted from Prince of Annwn by Evangeline Walton

I’m working on a new piece of Goddess embroidery inspired by Evangeline Walton’s novelizations of The Mabinogian.  I just finished Prince of Annwyn in which the goddess Modron (Mother) is a primary character.

In the design I’m working on right now her head is a sun symbol, her torso is rain fall, and her skirt the sown field motif, symbolizing the fertility of both the fields and women.  From her head sprouts the Tree of Life.

The Story of Mabon (Autumn Equinox)

At this point on the Wheel of the Year, we choose to celebrate the universal story of Mabon, which has been passed down to us from the ancient proto-Celtic oral tradition. Mabon ap Modron, meaning “son,” or “son of the mother,” is the Young Son, Divine Youth, or, Son of Light. Just as the September Equinox marks a significant time of change, so, too, does the birth of Mabon. Modron is his mother, the Great Goddess, Guardian of the Otherworld, Protector and Healer. She is Earth itself.

From the moment of the September Equinox, The Sun’s strength diminishes, until the moment of the Winter Solstice in December, when the Sun grows stronger and the days once again become become longer than the nights. Mabon also disappears, taken at birth when only three nights old. His mother is in sweet lament. And though his whereabouts are veiled in mystery, Mabon is eventually freed with the help of the wisdom and memory of the most ancient of living animals- the Blackbird, the Stag, the Owl, the Eagle and the Salmon. His seeker asks the ritual question of each totem animal: “Tell me if thou knowest aught of Mabon, the son of Modron, who was taken when three nights old from between his mother and the wall?”

All along, however, Mabon has been dwelling, a happy captive, in Modron’s magical Otherworld- Modron’s womb. It is a nurturing and enchanted place, but also one filled with challenges. Only in so powerful a place of renewable strength can Mabon be reborn as his mother’s champion, the source of Joy and Son of Light. Mabon’s light has been drawn into the Earth, gathering strength and wisdom enough to become a new seed.

To understand the themes of Mabon’s story is to accept the reality and significance of an archetypal world. The archetypes of Mabon and Modron are first forms or first models that allow us to consider information not strictly measurable by machines or the physical senses. They transcend the boundaries of convention and can travel, as the entire pantheon of Goddesses and Gods travels, between the worlds. Witches, like the Celts, who also practiced Witchcraft, have a deeply held sense of coexistent, multiple time dimensions. There are many cycles of time, and many of the cycles overlap. We believe in our history, but we also believe in the presence of truth outside of time. 

The story of Mabon and Modron, because it is archetypal, echoes through all ages and is for all beings of all religions in all worlds. There are many Mabons and many Modrons. The Greek God Apollo shares many of Mabon’s characteristics. Mabon’s Gaulish title is Maponus. Mabon was celebrated along Hadrian’s Wall, and there is new evidence that he was honored long before the arrival of the Vikings in North America! Although much was changed, aspects of Mabon and Modron are found in the later Jewish and Christian Religions.

Each of our cultural identities comes from how we interpret and position ourselves in the narratives of the past. During the September Equinox, this dramatic moment of cosmic balance as well as change, we honor Mabon and the Great Goddess, his mother, Modron, in ritual.

(Source: Celebrate the Earth: A Year of Holidays in the Pagan Tradition by Laurie Cabot and Jean Mills)

Celtic Goddesses and Gods Part 6

Mabon (Also Mapon, Maponus)- A Celtic sun God of prophesy, he is associated with light and the wild chase or ritual hunt. As the son of Modron, he is the great son (sun) of the Great Mother. He is taken from her when he is three days old. Called “The Son of Light” or “The Divine Son”, he represents youthfulness, sex, love, and magick, and enjoys playing tricks. Associated with Myrddin and later Christ, his symbols are the boar, mineral springs, and the lyre. 

Macha- A powerful Irish threefold sun Goddess of war, fertility, and ritual games, she was wife of Nemed and consort of Nuada; called the “Sun Woman.” Ancestress of the Red Branch, Macha is a Queen of Ireland, daughter of Ernmas, and granddaughter of Net. Her body is that of an athlete, and her symbols are the horse, raven, and crow. 

Mebd (Also Maeve, Mab)- A Goddess of sovereignty, she is the good queen call The Warrior Queen. She is the Faery Queen and Queen of Connaught. She runs faster than a horse, while carrying animals and birds on her arms and shoulders. She also carries a spear and shield.

Mei (Also Mai, Meia)- An Earth and sun Goddess, similar to Rosemerta, she is the mother of Gwalchmei.

Modrona (Also Modron, Madrona, Matrona)- A Goddess associated with Coventina, Morgana, Vivian, and Dechtire, she is an aspect of the All Mother. The Great Goddess and Mother of Mabon or “Light”. 

Morgana- A Goddess of war, fertility, and magick, she is the Death Mother and Queen of Death. Born of the sea, she is the daughter of Llyr and Anuand, a powerful shapeshifter. She is beautiful and sensuous. Her symbols are trees along shorelines, especially cypress trees, seashells, ravens and crows.

Morrigan (Also Morrigana)- She is called the Great Queen, Sea Queen, and the Great Sea Mother. As a powerful Goddess of wisdom and the sea, she is associated with the queen’s rod of command, sand dollars, ocean vegetation, manta rays and whales.   

Morrigu- A Goddess of death, life, music, and magick, she is called the Dark Gray Lady. She protects sailors and the shores of Erin and plays a harp made of silver, shell and pearl.

Myrddin- A sun and Earth God, Fire of Earth, he is a God of the woodlands, nature, and mirth. A Sky-God associated with stones, caves, crystals, and magick, as well as herbs, natural mineral deposits, and pure water springs, his symbols are the wild rose and sweet water springs. He plays a flute whose sound makes you want to dance. 

Nantosuelta- A Goddess of abundance associated with Sucellos; she is a river Goddess. She holds a dove house on a pole in one hand, and carried a bakers paddle. 

Nemetona- A warrior Goddess of the oak grove, she is the great protectress of the sacred nematon. Also a patron of thermal springs, her symbols are oak groves, a ram, and a spear made of ash with a tip of silver. 

Nimue (Also Niniane, Niviene, Nymenche)- An Earth and Water Goddess and a young aspect of the Bright All Mother, she is a Goddess of lakes also known as the Lady of the Lake, maker and keeper of Excalibur, King Arthur’s sword. She is consort, student, and teacher to Myrddin. She created the river, Ninian, that originates in the Cotes-d’ Armor in Brittany. Her symbols are a white-silver sword, underwater caves, swans, swallows, and quartz and crystalline formations. 

Nodens- A God of sleep, dreams, and dream magick, he is a God of the Otherworld. 

Nwyvre- A God of the ether, stars, and space, he is also a God of celestial sciences, astronomy, and astrology. Consort to Arianrhod, his symbol is the nine-pointed star. 

(Source: Exploring Celtic Druidism by Sirona Knight)