modification inspiration

INSTAGRAM: loganmartintran 

Reaching for the light // I’ve learned early on in my life that no matter how hard we try, we will always have times in our lives where we find ourselves in dark places. I’m currently in the darkest place I’ve ever been in, and it’s a constant battle for me to remind myself that it doesn’t end here. It’s in these darkest places and in these darkest moments that we are challenged the most; Causing us to learn the most, grow the most, and change the most…and by God’s grace, these dark places can transform into beautiful things. This is currently my deepest prayer and heart’s desire. Let the ruins come to life, in the beauty of Your name.

Sisters + botanicals. Available for tattoo in North London.

Hit me up >> lam@lamhamilton.com

Instagram: loganmartintran // celebrationorl

We all have to start from somewhere. You have to want it bad enough in order to achieve it. Work hard, stay motivated. Moderation and dedication you will soon be there beautiful.

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Nissan Sileighty/Sil80. A custom car with the body of the 180SX and the nose of a Silvia which originated through street racers in Japan who owned Nissan 180SXs with damaged front ends. Because the Silvia’s front panels and lights were lighter and cheaper than the 180SX replacement parts, many drifters used these parts instead. The modifications inspired a Japanese auto shop, Kids Heart, to produce a small number of so-called “official” Nissan Sileighties, some 400 cars were made in 1998

While I refuse to reduce either economy or ecology to the other, there is one connection between economy and environment that seems important to introduce up front: the history of the human concentration of wealth through making both humans and nonhumans into resources for investment. This history has inspired investors to imbue both people and things with alienation, that is, the ability to stand alone, as if the entanglements of living did not matter. Through alienation, people and things become mobile assets; they can be removed from their life worlds in distance-defying transport to be exchanged with other assets from other life worlds, elsewhere. This is quite different from merely using others as part of a life world – for example, in eating and being eaten. In that case, multispecies living spaces remain in place. Alienation obviates living-space entanglement. The dream of alienation inspires landscape modification in which one stand-alone asset matters; everything else becomes weeds or waste. Here, attending to living-space entanglements seems inefficient, and perhaps archaic. When its singular asset can no longer be produced, a place can be abandoned. The timber has been cut; the oil has run out; the plantation soil no longer supports crops. The search for assets resumes elsewhere. Thus, simplification for alienation produces ruins, spaces of abandonment for asset production.

Global landscapes today are strewn with this kind of ruin. Still, these places can be lively despite announcements of their death: abandoned asset fields sometimes yield new multispecies and multicultural life. In a global state of precarity, we don’t have choices other than looking for life in this ruin.

—  Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing, The Mushroom at the End of the World