modern russia

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I’m still slacking off on all my responsibilities and am not feeling well, so I decided to start a small project that I’ve been meaning to do for a while; namely, illustrating the relations between Prussia and Russia, starting with the 18th century!
…obviously my style is not going to be very consistent. Anyway, on to explain this piece! My knowledge may not be 100% accurate and corrections are appreciated.

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The Rise of the Russian Avant-Garde

A Revolutionary Impulse: The Rise of the Russian Avant-Garde opens this Saturday, December 3. The exhibition brings together 260 major works from MoMA’s collection, tracing the period of artistic innovation between 1912 and 1935. Planned in anticipation of the centennial year of the 1917 Russian Revolution, the exhibition highlights breakthrough developments in the conception of Suprematism and Constructivism, as well as in avant-garde poetry, theater, photography, and film, by such figures as Alexandra Exter, Natalia Goncharova, El Lissitzky, Kazimir Malevich, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Lyubov Popova, Alexandr Rodchenko, Olga Rozanova, Vladimir and Georgii Stenberg, and Dziga Vertov, among others.

[Gustav Klutsis. Memorial to Fallen Leaders. 1927. Cover with lithographed photomontage illustrations on front and back. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of The Judith Rothschild Foundation. © 2016 / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

A Revolutionary Impulse: The Rise of the Russian Avant-Garde opens today!

Planned in anticipation of the centennial year of the 1917 Russian Revolution, this exhibition brings together 260 major works from our collection, tracing the period of artistic innovation between 1912 and 1935, and highlights breakthrough developments in the conception of Suprematism and Constructivism, as well as in avant-garde poetry, theater, photography, and film.

For more info, visit http://mo.ma/RevolutionaryImpulse

[El Lissitzky. Proun 19D.1920 or 1921. Gesso, oil, varnish, crayon, colored papers, sandpaper, graph paper, cardboard, metallic paint, and metal foil on plywood. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Katherine S. Dreier Bequest]