mod social

musingsfromtheclosetofanunknown  asked:

So I want to write a character who is meeting an autistic person for the first time, and I want them to have good intentions and be a fairly kind person but also make mistakes and say things they don't quite realize is wrong. My question is: what kind of mistakes do you see allistic people make that aren't intentional and aren't unforgivably offensive? How are some ways autistic people deal with this? How frustrated might someone get having to explain these things so often?

Ideas of possible things your character might do:

  • Use that special voice they save for children and people who are disabled (we are disabled, but we are still adults)

  • Or, if talking to an autistic child, speak to them as if they are much younger

  • Give well-meaning but vaguely insulting platitudes about autism “oh you are soooo brave”

  • Say other well-meaning but rude comments like “oh, you don’t look autistic! I would never have known, you seem really normal.”

  • Try to make allowances for the autistic person’s disability, without realising that they are coming across as patronising and are in fact presuming that they are unable to do things that they are able to do
  • Be overly positive and smiley and happy all the time
  • Learn a small amount about autism and assume that it applies to all autistic people.

  • For example:
    – assumes that autistic character cannot ever understand sarcasm
    – assumes that autistic character will have a particular sensory profile (not every autistic person hates noise!
    – makes comparisons to another autistic person - this is especially annoying if they are comparing an adult with autism to an autistic child (*wow, I don’t behave like your four-year-old nephew? Amazing!*)

  • Use “positive” stereotypes (e.g. “I love autistic people, they are so honest”) - I understand that they are trying to be nice, but I still want to roll my eyes way back into the back of my head sometimes. See also : this post from realsocialskills

  • For example:
    them
    : *asks character’s opinion about something*
    autistic character
    : *lies to their face*
    them
    : “see, that’s what I love about you, character, I always know that you’ll tell me the truth”


If your character is willing to learn and adjust their behaviour, that’s good, but most people will stay that way forever, and this is probably what the autistic character is expecting to happen.

How frustrated the autistic character becomes depends on their personality!

Some characters will show frustration more readily than others. Some characters would never explain that there was a problem, or might not be able to, or might be worried about how to do it without being rude themselves.

How the autistic character deals with the unintentionally rude person depends on lots of factors - their personality, how often they will be seeing the rude person, who else is around them, etc.

Hope this helps.

-Mod Snail

  • me: money isn't real and scarcity is almost always fabricated. we literally throw away necessities. we produce to excess and a majority of our labor could be automated.
  • them: okay but sweaty who's going to pay for that?
  • me: no one. money isn't real. scarcity is fabricated. we produce and throw away excess necessities.
  • them: but we can't afford to just give away necessities life doesn't work that way.
  • me: the goods literally already exist. you literally just put them in the hands of people who need them instead of the fucking dumpster.
  • them: but what about the money?
  • [Hunk is in the shower]
  • Lance: Can you come out here?
  • Hunk: Just a second.
  • Lance: There's a snake in here, Hunk.
  • Hunk: What?!
  • [runs from shower]
  • Hunk: Where?
  • Lance: Okay, there isn't a snake but I need to ask you something.
  • Hunk: Are you kidding me? I could have been killed!
  • Lance: How?
  • Hunk: By running too fast! And getting twisted in the curtain!

gnomer-denois  asked:

In a high fantasy story, if an autistic person felt they needed to join a quest to save the world, er Queen, with a party of 4 other people, are there any personalities or actions that would impact the more than the other members? If they had to spend the EPIC journey learning/refining fighting techniques would it present unique challenges? Could you give some examples of stims that would be easy to do on horse back?

Sorry to dump so many questions on you all. I’m working on three books and got to thinking about autistic characters in them and the ideas just kept coming in. You are so awesome, I love you. Please keep up the great work.            

Hi there!

Some kinds of people an autistic person could have trouble with could be:

  • People who talk very loud or otherwise make a lot of noise *side-eyeing my constantly-beatboxing brother*
  • People who talk very fast or indistinctly and get angry when asked to repeat
  • People who don’t take personal boundaries into account and insist on touching/hugging… the character even though they can’t stand it
  • People with very little patience and a short temper who are not ready to try and learn to accomodate the autistic character’s differences
  • People who struggle with seeing other people’s points of view and take every autistic difference as offences against their person
  • People who tick off sensory problems in other ways (strong perfume, brightly-colored clothing, listening to loud music all the time…)

Here are some epic adventure things your autistic character may struggle with (as always these are just examples, it’s up to you to decide what your character struggles with and what they will encounter on their journey):

  • Anything that might disrupt their routine, such as an attack right as they are setting camp, will probably be difficult to deal with.
  • Going throught the Land Of Technicolor Fire And Vuvuzelas will probably be understandably difficult for your character. Think about what in their environment could trigger their sensory issues. This depends completely on the specific issues they have.
  • They’re probably not the one to put in charge when it’s time to have that diplomatic discussion with the king the whole world depends on.
  • If their special interest is baking, they may miss it very much while on the road, and feel bad because of it. But well, as they say, necessity is the mother of invention. I’m sure there’s a way to bake stuff on an open fire with no flour or eggs or sugar available.
  • Horses, since you mentioned horses, can be loud and unpredictable. This can be a problem.
  • Having a shutdown when you’re in mortal danger is not a very good idea, but usually you don’t really have a choice. Having a meltdown in the middle of a forest filled with will-eat-you-if-you-make-the-slightest-noise creatures is not a very good idea either.

As for the fighting training, possible difficulties could be dyspraxia/difficulty with motor skills, if they have it, as well as the noise that metal blades make when they crash into each other.

As a rider I can definitely answer that last question. First of all, many stims would be impossible or dangerous to do on horseback, depending on the horse (if it’s very chill or rather nervous). Rapid movement in the peripheric vision of the horse is best to avoid, because chances are it’ll go “AAAAH A PREDATOR” and start running away very fast. So things such as hand flapping will probably be out of the question. Since rocking changes your balance and the place where your body weight is, your horse will probably think you’re trying to communicate something and become very confused as a result, so it’s best to avoid that as well. Same things for leg movements, your horse wil probably interpret them as you wanting to go faster. So I’d say it would be best to keep to small hand movements such as finger tapping on the saddle. Humming or singing is possible too, and so is playing with hair. There are also some stims that one can specifically do one horseback, such as texture stimming with the hair or mane of the horse, pressure stimming by putting your hands under the saddle, or, well… Riding ? Riding is stimmy in itself. Going fast on a horse is great for people who like speed, and just the movement of the horse itself is kind of like rocking, except you don’t even have to put in any effort.

And don’t worry about the questions, we’ve spaced them out a bit but they’ve been great! You know where to find us if you have more :)

-Mod Cat

NTs make social awkwardness into such a ~*cute acceptable relatable ~* thing, and while it’s true that there’s a difference between NTs’ version of social awkwardness, there’s a whole different definition of it for ND people that is definitely NOT ADORABLe

When I say I don’t like to be around people, others say stuff like “yeah I hate people too” but they don’t understand I literally get anxious and disoriented around them and likely even overloaded from the noise and the general presence of multiple people

When I talk about having trouble ordering food, they go “yeah relatable I feel awkward too” but I’m already so uncomfortable with the entire system of hierarchy that has its place in a restaurant, (at least in my mind) and I feel guilty asking anyone for anything in the first place, and then I script my order and repeat it internally for seven times and it still comes out jumbled and muttered so I have to repeat myself AGAIN

Like, I get it. Everyone struggles with being social from time to time.
But dear NTs, when a person with an anxiety disorder or social phobia or autism or literally any neurotype that influences their ability to function in social situations tells you that they struggle with something, please don’t assume they struggle exactly the same way as you, because most likely, we don’t.

Dysphoria isn’t only physical

Heyo! You’re local enby here to tell you something many people don’t seem to know or understand!

DYSPHORIA ISN’T ONLY PHYSICAL. That’s right! Many people think “dysphoria” means that you have some sort of physical discomfort or dislike, that is not the only thing it is!

Let me introduce you to SOCIAL dysphoria.

Social dysphoria: Dysphoria triggered by/based around societal views of you and your gender. This falls under the DSM-5 category of “Gender Dysphoria”.

Now, what exactly does that definition mean? Well…

Social dysphoria can happen when:

-you are misgendered

-people use the incorrect pronouns

-people deadname you

-people say transgender isn’t real

-people tell you that you are going to hell

-saying you won’t find love that way

-saying it is just a phase

-people not supporting your identity

-people push gender roles onto you that aren’t yours

- P = boy, V = girl (usually excluding intersex people)

and much much more!

Basically, social dysphoria is what happens when other people invalidate you and your identity.

And for those of you thinking “yes it is!” / “it’s the physical dysphoria that counts!” or something along those lines, that is incorrect. Ask any therapist that specializes in gender identity and they will tell you that is very far from the truth!

what if aliens are grossed out by human body mods, like, even basic things, like ear piercings and tattoos. like, you stab yourself with needles, put metal in the wounds deliberately preventing normal healing? thats hella gross. and then of course less common body mods are even stranger to them. its even stranger when you remember that tattoos and piercings arose in a lot of different cultures it makes sense, in a way. humans, for all the talk of their survival instinct and force of will, are pretty bad at self-preservation on a day to day basis

on the contrary, what if they have their own body mod culture? beyond what human tech is capable of, and not anything we’d ever come up with. like, transdermal implants exist for us, but what if some aliens have those instead of tattoos because their “vision” doesn’t include visible light. or maybe their skin changes color naturally, and permanent color changes would hinder whatever color change is meant for in their lives. maybe their body mods are something their senses can detect, but ours can’t.

strong enough echolocation can sort of detect internal structures, so body mods invisible to us could theoretically sound really cool. if their biotech is up for it, aliens primarily sensing through smell could have scent gland implants. 

or maybe they’re shapeshifting, or something similar, and its a societal norm that you have body mods, and they’re surprised that humans do so little. like, form changes are so normal, that no one looks like they would’ve normally, everyone is the ideal version of themselves, and now that sort of segues into plastic surgery and what aliens would make of that.

anonymous asked:

"There are many other ways in which you can fill the social criteria for a diagnosis while still understanding social cues." Do you mind elaborating on this? (from a social cues ask)

For example, even if you understand them perfectly, how you respond to them may not be how allistics expect. There can be differences in social and emotional reciprocity. While some of us do not experience some types of empathy, many of us do experience empathy (sometimes in abundance), and may simply express empathy differently.

It is very common that when autistics express empathy, they will relate it back to themselves personally. If someone told you that they were frightened by a dog, you might respond by telling a story that a dog once barked at you and you’ve been afraid ever since - allistics often see this as trying to one-up them, but for many of us this our way of explaining that we understand; it is an expression of empathy.

Even if we know have to respond to social cues, there may be idiosyncrasies in how we do it. While a lot of people talk with their hands for emphasis, a lot of autistics “talk with their body” in ways that are exaggerated, or we might go the other way and express little to no body language outside of stimming.

Eye contact is probably the most well known of these. A lot of us do not make eye contact, or only make eye contact when the other person is not looking, when they are not speaking to us, or when we are not speaking to them (I almost always look away when I speak to someone, for example).

When asked to describe something, we might respond talking about exactly what is going on - “there is a witch riding a broom. It looks like there are papers flying by her, so she is probably moving fast,” or something like that. Notice how I’m not actually describing her emotions? Does she look angry? Does she look excited? Who knows? Whether or not we describe emotion in a given situation, or when we describe emotion, can be very telling in terms of our social and emotional reciprocity.

- Sam

Neurotypical Social Skill #121

Neurotypicals enjoy making movies, books, shows, comics, etc., that portray neurodivergents as scary, and when you call them on it, they often will say that “it’s just fiction!!!” Show them the flaw in this logic by writing slews upon slews of stories featuring M’Night Shyamalan as a serial kidnapper, Koogi as both a killer and a stalker, and all neurotypicals as piles of excrement in trenchcoats. When they complain about you being rude, remind them that it’s only fiction.

anonymous asked:

I've seen a few terms on this site (ableist, terf, and swerf) almost everywhere, and I was hoping if you could explain what it means. Thanks!

Hi anon! I’m technically taking a break from this blog, but I actually really wanted to answer this question in particular because it’s really important. I hope you don’t mind!

Content note: violence, transphobia, whorephobia, sex shaming, use of slurs, rape mention, death mention, murder mention, genitalia mention, pedophilia mention

1. Ableist

Ableism is hate, oppression, harassment, disdain, disrespect, erasure, etc related to disabled people. It can go from openly hating and mocking disabled people, to normalized ableism in the language (the use of ableist slurs like “dm*b”, “l*me”, “st*pid”, etc). It can also be not taking disabled people into account when stating things (for example “just go and walk every day to be healthier!” when a lot of people CAN’T walk). 

To quote Urban Dictionary:

Ableism is the discrimination or prejudice against people who have disabilities. Ableism can take the form of ideas and assumptions, stereotypes, attitudes and practices, physical barriers in the environment, or larger scale oppression. It is oftentimes unintentional and most people are completely unaware of the impact of their words or actions.

The thought that people with disabilities are dependent and require the care and support of someone else is an example of ableism. Sometimes this comes out in the form of people helping people with disabilities without asking them if they need assistance (and of course waiting the affirmative response).

Another example would be in designing spaces, places, events, information, communication, and technology without considering the variety of needs of people with disabilities. For example, a building that is built to code can still be technically inaccessible if the ramp is around the back of the building or if there is no automatic door opener installed.


Another quote from Urban Dictionary explains it this way:

Ableism is a form of discrimination toward people with disabilities either physical or mental. Generally, ableism prevents disabled persons from having the same access to rights and services that average people have no problems obtaining.


Wikipedia explains it this way:

In ableist societies, able-bodiedness is viewed as the norm; people with disabilities are understood as those that deviate from that norm. Disability is seen as something to overcome or to fix, for example, through medical intervention. The ableist worldview holds that disability is an error or a failing rather than a consequence of human diversity, akin to race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or gender. One common type of ableist behavior denies others’ autonomy by speaking for or about them rather than allowing them to speak for themselves. An example of this behavior occurs when a waiter speaks to an aid or a companion instead of directly to the person with a disability.

Other definitions of ableism include those of Chouinard, who defines it as “ideas, practices, institutions, and social relations that presume able-bodiedness, and by so doing, construct persons with disabilities as marginalized […] and largely invisible ‘others,’” and of Amundson and Taira, who define ableism as “a doctrine that falsely treats impairments as inherently and naturally horrible and blames the impairments themselves for the problems experienced by the people who have them.”


Ableism is also related to mental disabilities and mental illnesses as well. Discrimination against someone for things like having a low IQ, being “cr*zy,” not processing information or emotions in a way deemed “normal,” and other similar acts are all ableism. Other words for this specific form of ableism include “mentalism” and “sanism,” although I personally dislike those terms.


Wikipedia explains:

Mentalism or sanism is a form of discrimination and oppression because of a mental trait or condition a person has, or is judged to have. This may or may not be described in terms of mental disorder or disability. The discrimination is based on numerous factors such as: stereotypes about neurodivergence (e.g. autism, ADHD, bipolar, schizophrenia, personality disorder diagnoses), specific behavioral phenomena (e.g. stuttering, tics), or supposed intelligence.

Like other “isms” such as sexism and racism, mentalism involves multiple intersecting oppressions and complex social inequalities and imbalances of power. It can result in covert discrimination by multiple, small insults and indignities. It is characterized by judgments of another person’s perceived mental health status. These judgments are followed by actions such as blatant, overt discrimination (refusal of service, denying of human rights). Mentalism impacts how individuals are treated by the general public, by mental health professionals, and by institutions, including the legal system. The negative attitudes may also be internalized.

The terms mentalism (from mental) and sanism (from sane) have some widespread use, though concepts such as social stigma, and in some cases ableism, may be used in similar but not identical ways.

While mentalism and sanism are used interchangeably, sanism is becoming predominant in certain circles, such as academics, those who identify as mad and mad advocates and in a socio-political context where sanism is gaining ground as a movement. The movement of sanism is an act of resistance among those who identify as mad, consumer survivors, and mental health advocates. In academia evidence of this movement can be found in the number of recent publications about sanism and social work practice.


When someone says something is “ableist,” they are saying it contributes to ableism (or mentalism/sanism, if you choose to use such terms). In other words, they are saying it is discriminatory to people with mental illness, mental disability, or physical disability. 


2. TERF or TWERF

I’m sure you already know to some extent what feminism is, but just in case, let me share with you a quote:

Feminism comprises a number of egalitarian social, cultural and political movements, theories and moral philosophies concerned with gender inequalities and equal rights for women. It is the doctrine advocating social, political and all other rights for women which are equal to those of men.

Feminist political activists have been concerned with issues such as a woman’s right of contract and property; a woman’s right to bodily integrity and autonomy (e.g. on matters such as reproductive rights, abortion rights, access to contraception and quality prenatal care); women’s rights to protection from domestic violence, sexual harassment and rape; women’s workplace rights (e.g. maternity leave, equal pay, glass ceiling practices, etc); and opposition to all other forms of discrimination.

Feminist Theory is an extension of Feminism into theoretical or philosophical fields, such as anthropology, sociology, economics, women’s studies, literary criticism, art history, psychoanalysis and philosophy. It aims to understand gender inequality and focuses on gender politics, power relations and sexuality, as well as the promotion of women’s rights and interests.


Wikipedia explains feminism this way:

Feminism is a range of political movements, ideologies, and social movements that share a common goal: to define, establish, and achieve political, economic, personal, and social rights for women. This includes seeking to establish equal opportunities for women in education and employment.

Feminist movements have campaigned and continue to campaign for women’s rights, including the right to vote, to hold public office, to work, to earn fair wages or equal pay, to own property, to receive education, to enter contracts, to have equal rights within marriage, and to have maternity leave. Feminists have also worked to promote bodily autonomy and integrity, and to protect women and girls from rape, sexual harassment, and domestic violence.

Feminist campaigns are generally considered to be a main force behind major historical societal changes for women’s rights, particularly in the West, where they are near-universally credited with achieving women’s suffrage, gender neutrality in English, reproductive rights for women (including access to contraceptives and abortion), and the right to enter into contracts and own property. Although feminist advocacy is, and has been, mainly focused on women’s rights, some feminists, including bell hooks, argue for the inclusion of men’s liberation within its aims because men are also harmed by traditional gender rolesFeminist theory, which emerged from feminist movements, aims to understand the nature of gender inequality by examining women’s social roles and lived experience; it has developed theories in a variety of disciplines in order to respond to issues concerning gender.

Numerous feminist movements and ideologies have developed over the years and represent different viewpoints and aims. Some forms of feminism have been criticized for taking into account only white, middle class, and educated perspectives. This criticism led to the creation of ethnically specific or multicultural forms of feminism, including black feminism and intersectional feminism.


When you see someone being called a TERF, it is a warning to others that this is a feminist who is dangerous, bigoted, and hateful towards transgender individuals. Calling someone a TERF means you are calling them a feminist who is transphobic and promoting hateful, antitrans ideologies.


To quote Geek Feminism:

TERF is an acronym for Trans-Exclusionary Radical Feminist. Sometimes, “exclusionary” is expanded as “eliminationist” or “exterminationist” instead to more accurately convey the degree to which TERFs advocate for harm towards trans people, specifically trans people who were coercively assigned male at birth.

Some TERFs call themselves “gender-critical feminists”, a term which is synonymous with “TERF”.

Their position (which is not shared by this wiki) denies that trans people’s self-affirmed genders and sexes are equally valid as cis people’s self-affirmed genders and sexes. It has a decades-long history of allying with anti-feminist causes in denying trans people access to health care, and other human rights.

Unsurprisingly, many TERFs complain that “TERF” should be regarded as a slur.

According to Tracey at The TERFs (an anti-TERF site) and Cristan Williams at The Transadvocate, the term TERF was first used in writing by Viv Smythe/tigtog of Hoyden About Town in August 2008. tigtog said in the interview with Cristan Williams that she believes that she and Lauredhel coined it some time prior as a chat shorthand.


In some contexts, you might also hear “TWERF” used instead to convey that the person isn’t against all trans people, but rather just transgender women (women who were assigned male at birth). 


In case you didn’t know what radical feminism is, this is how Wikipedia explains it:

Radical feminism is a perspective within feminism that calls for a radical reordering of society in which male supremacy is eliminated in all social and economic contexts.

Radical feminists seek to abolish patriarchy by challenging existing social norms and institutions, rather than through a purely political process. This includes challenging the notion of traditional gender roles, opposing the sexual objectification of women, and raising public awareness about such issues as rape and violence against women.

Early radical feminism, arising within second-wave feminism in the 1960s, typically viewed patriarchy as a “transhistorical phenomenon" prior to or deeper than other sources of oppression, “not only the oldest and most universal form of domination but the primary form" and the model for all others. Later politics derived from radical feminism ranged from cultural feminism to more syncretic politics that placed issues of class, economics, etc. on a par with patriarchy as sources of oppression.

Radical feminists locate the root cause of women’s oppression in patriarchal gender relations, as opposed to legal systems (as in liberal feminism) or class conflict (as in anarchist feminism, socialist feminism, and Marxist feminism).


In other words, radical feminism doesn’t relate to being “extremist,” as the word radical implies, but rather to eliminating the root of misogyny and the oppression of women.


Many radical feminists are TERFS, but not all are. I was always told that radical feminists coined the word TERF to separate them from the movement, because transgender exclusion was, in their minds, not part of their movement. I can’t verify this for sure.


Many people do not seem to know this, but there are many branches of feminism. Radical feminism is one of hundreds of schools of thought within feminism. 

Philosophy Basics explains:

Radical Feminism considers the capitalist hierarchy of society, which it describes as sexist and male-based, as the defining feature of women’s oppression. Most Radical Feminists see no alternatives other than the total uprooting and reconstruction of society in order to overthrow patriarchy and achieve their goals.

Separatist Feminism is a form of Radical Feminism, which argues that the sexual disparities between men and women are unresolvable, that men cannot make positive contributions to the feminist movement, and that even well-intentioned men replicate patriarchal dynamics.

Sex-Positive Feminism is a response to anti-pornography feminists who argue that heterosexual pornography is a central cause of women’s oppression, and that sexual freedom (which may or may not involve a woman’s ight to participate in heterosexual pornography) is an essential component of women’s freedom.

Anarcha-Feminism (or Anarchist Feminism) is another offshoot of Radical Feminism and combines Feminist and Anarchist beliefs in which patriarchy is viewed as a manifestation of hierarchy so that the fight against patriarchy is an essential part of the class struggle and the Anarchist struggle against the state.

Black Feminism (or Womanism) argues that sexism, class oppression and racism are inextricably bound together. Alice Walker and other Womanists claim that black women experience a different and more intense kind of oppression from that of white women.

Socialist Feminism (or Marxist Feminism) connects the oppression of women to Marxist ideas about exploitation, oppression and labour. Socialist Feminists see the need to work alongside men and all other groups, and to focus their energies on broad change that affects society as a whole, and not just on an individual basis.

Liberal Feminism (or Individualist Feminism) seeks the equality of men and women through political and legal reform. Liberal Feminists see the personal individual interactions between men and women as the place from which to transform society and argue that no major change to the structure of society is needed.

French Feminism (or Post-Structural Feminism) tends to be more philosophical and more literary, than the more pragmatic Anglophone Feminism. It is less concerned with immediate political doctrine and generally focuses on theories of “the body”. The 1949 treatise “The Second Sex” by the French author and philosopher Simone de Beauvoir (1908 - 1986) is a foundational tract of contemporary Feminism, in which she sets out a feminist Existentialism which prescribes a moral revolution and focuses on the concept of Woman as the quintessential Other, which de Beauvoir identifies as fundamental to women’s oppression.

Eco-Feminism links Feminism with ecology, arguing that the domination of women stems from the same patriarchal ideologies that bring about the domination and destruction of the environment.

Christian Feminism is a branch of feminist theology which seeks to interpret and understand Christianity in light of the equality of women and men, which has been largely ignored historically.

Pro-Feminism refers to support of Feminism without implying that the supporter is a member of the feminist movement. It is usually used in reference to men who are actively supportive of Feminism and of efforts to bring about gender equality.


And this is not, by any means, a complete list. There are many other branches of feminist theory and feminist thought, and many different ways that people can engage in feminist activism.


But TERFS often only acknowledge radical feminism (which they consider the only real feminism) and liberal feminism.


Transgender Advocate explains the warning signs that you as an individual might be a TERF:

I’ve noticed that there seems to be some confusion about what a TERF* is so, here’s a quick guide to help you figure out if you’re a TERF. Chances are that you’re a TERF if you believe that you’re a feminist when you…

1.) Claim that trans women are cis men, that trans men are cis women and purposefully misgender trans people.

2.) Out trans people to employers.

3.) Tell trans women their surgery is about supporting rape culture.

4.) Assert that lesbian-identified trans women can’t be lesbian.

5.) Claim that a world without trans people is preferable.

6.) Find that your anti-trans arguments and the anti-trans arguments of far right-wing groups match.

7.) Assert cis privilege isn’t real; that non-trans people aren’t privileged in a society that’s hostile to trans people.

8.) Claim that gender isn’t real, but the MAAB/FAAB binary is.

9.) Claim that trans surgeries were pioneered by men in service of the patriarchy.

10.) Lie about rape and death threats you’ve received from trans people.

11.) Fearmonger about the rape/violence threat trans women pose to cis women in the women’s restroom.

12.) Assert that trans people transition to satisfy their sexual urges.

13.) Degrade and dehumanize the genitals of trans people.

14.) Work to overturn trans equality protections.

15.) Work to halt access to trans medical care.

16.) Appeal to the Klan Fallacy.

17.) Compare transition to a disgusting Frankenstein-like process.

18.) Claim that trans people transition due to political or social pressures.

19.) Claim that when you work to halt the propagation of anti-feminist stereotypes it’s empowerment, but when trans people work to halt the propagation of anti-trans stereotypes it’s censorship .

20.) Assert that trans women transition because they’re actually gay men and that trans men transition because they’re lesbians wanting to escape the patriarchy.

21.) Threaten actual radical feminist organizations with killing its trans members, and then show up at the radfem event armed with guns.

22.) Beat actual radical feminists for protecting trans women from a TERF bashing.

23.) Mob Lesbian Avengers who have a trans kid with them and then threaten the kid with a knife.

24.) Menace a butch Lesbian radical feminist so much that the radfem decides to start their own inclusive Women’s Music Festival.

25.) Threaten a group of trans women with bodily violence so that they have to start something called Camp Trans in protest.

26.) Promote so-called “bathroom bills” because you think it’s “pro-Lesbian.”

27.) Find that Tea Party Republicans start promoting your TERF rhetoric.

28.) Promote right-wing propaganda mill nonsense to substantiate your hate because they’re the only ones who, in your estimation, are your ideological allies.

29.) Find that right-wing pundits and even hate groups like the Westboro Baptist Church defend TERF hate.

30.) Appeal to vaginal odors as being a sexed essence which demarcates an authentic sexed status, so that trans women aren’t actual women because the vaginas of trans women are so smelly that it causes “serious smell issues” while, simultaneously being so non-smelly that a trans woman can never know (as actual women apparently do) what it’s like to have a “big, hairy, smelly vagina.”

Bonus: Pretend that the term “TERF” –popularized, in 2008 by a radical feminist-inclusive feminist community as a way of distinguishing between radical feminists from anti-trans bigots who label themselves “radical feminists”– was actually created by the trans  community in order to slur feminism.


I highly recommend these sources if you would like to know more:

Trans-Exclusionary Radical Feminism: What Exactly Is It, And Why Does It Hurt?

The Terfs

Trans Exclusionary Radical Feminism on Rational Wiki


Of these sources, The Terfs will be the most helpful, but it contains a lot of violence and disturbing language. Please stay safe!


3. SWERF

SWERFS are another subgroup of radical feminists, very similar to TERFS. Often, someone who is a TERF will also be a SWERF, but this is not always the case.


Urban Dictionary defines SWERF this way:

Acronym for “Sex Worker Exclusionary Radical Feminist”. A person who espouses to be a feminist but who does not believe that women engaged in ANY form of voluntary sex work should be included in the fight for equality, especially in employment or salary parity. This rabid exclusion of an entire class of women is usually a belief based on misplaced uptight morality.


Rational Wiki explains further:

Sex worker exclusionary radical feminism (also known as SWERF) is yet another offshoot of feminism, one that opposes women’s participation in pornography and prostitution. The term was coined to match that of TERF, as their memberships overlap. Their ideology also overlaps as both subgroups follow a prescriptive, normative approach to feminism; i.e., telling women what to do — TERFs with their gender, and SWERFs with their sexuality.

SWERFs criticize the objectification and exploitation of women within pornography and the sex industry, as well as the violence and abuse that sex workers frequently suffer.

SWERFs typically go completely overboard and dump on sex-workers who chose their profession freely, even in places where it is completely legal and safe, claiming that the sex workers are nothing more than deluded victims (and co-perpetrators) of human trafficking. Much like white supremacists might insist that adoption agencies helping children from the third world find parents in the west are nothing more than deluded extinctionists. This dogmatic hostility to voluntary sex work is known as whorephobia.


Many SWERFS argue that they do not like when men control women’s sexuality. But these same people do exactly the same thing. They attack women for being involved in sex work and/or BDSM/kink, or liking porn. Sometimes they will also police women for what they wear or for having makeup, and will also criticize people for playing dressup with their daughters because the believe this is “sexualizing children” and contributing to “pedophilia culture.”


SJW Wiki uses this quote from Tumblr to explain:

“The mere fact that SWERFs are not actively antagonizing workers in the garment industry, or the domestic labor industry, or the farming and food production industry, or even going after MALE sex workers to the degree that they speak over and attack female sex workers shows that their their actions aren’t about ending incidents of abuse, discrimination and sexual misconduct in the workforce, but about controlling women’s bodies, specifically women’s sexual agency .”

Musings of a Naked Lady, on Tumblr


Interestingly, when I Google “TERF,” many articles about how awful and hateful TERFS are show up. But when I Google “SWERF,” most of the articles that appear are defending TERFS and SWERFS and arguing that these terms are an attack on women and radical feminism.


I think the moral of the story there is that more people are uncomfortable with transphobia than they are whorephobia, which is sad because many many people see nothing wrong with transphobia.


I hope you found this helpful, anon! Let us know if you have more questions!


💖 Mod Bella 💖