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On this day in music history: June 12, 1979 - “Candy-O”, the second album by The Cars is released. Produced by Roy Thomas Baker, it is recorded at Cherokee Studios in Los Angeles, CA in February 1979. Released six days shy of one year after their self-titled debut, The Cars’ sophomore album is recorded shortly after the band come off of the promotional tour for the first one. With their first album still sitting comfortably in the Top 30 on the Billboard Top 200, the bands’ label Elektra Records wants to hold back the release for several more months until the others momentum begins to wane. However, with Ric Ocasek already writing songs for the next album, they are insistent that Elektra not delay the release. Like their debut, “Candy-O” features all newly material written by Ocasek and bassist Benjamin Orr, with the leftover songs from the first being scrapped in favor of the new ones. Working once again with producer Roy Thomas Baker, The Cars take a slightly different approach, wanting to make their sophomore “less slick” sounding than the previous one, and also being more democratic in choosing the final group of songs the album. Initially, the track “Double Life” was going to be dropped, but when the other band member outvote Ocasek, it is reinstated. The albums striking cover artwork is illustrated by artist Alberto Vargas, famous for his paintings appearing in major publications including Playboy and Esquire magazines. Drummer David Robinson suggests to his band mates that they hire the then 83 year old artist, who agrees to come out of retirement to create the cover. The model featured in the painting is actress Candy Moore, best known for playing Lucille Ball’s daughter Chris on the 60’s sitcom “The Lucy Show”. Having previously been married to actor Paul Gleason (“The Breakfast Club”, “Die Hard”), Moore and Robinson date briefly not long after the release of “Candy-O”. The new album is well received by fans and critics alike, spinning off three singles, including “Let’s Go” (#14 Pop) and “It’s All I Can Do” (#41 Pop). First released on CD in the mid 80’s, it is remastered and reissued as a 24K gold CD and 180 gram LP by Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab in 2011. It is also issued on colored vinyl (red) as part of the box set “The Elektra Years - 1978 -1987 in 2016. "Candy-O” peaks at number three on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 4x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: June 6, 1978 - “The Cars”, the debut album by The Cars is released. Produced by Roy Thomas Baker. it is recorded at AIR Studios in London in February 1978. Written over a period of two years, the material that makes up The Cars debut release are largely composed by guitarist and primary lead vocalist Ric Ocasek and bassist and vocalist Benjamin Orr. The bands demo of the track “Just What I Needed” receives airplay on local Boston radio station WCBN, which creates enough buzz to attract the attention of Elektra Records who sign them. Paired with producer Roy Thomas Baker (Queen, Journey, Free). They travel to London to record at George Martin’s AIR Studios. Recorded in just two weeks worth of studio time, the first album by the Boston based new wave/rock band becomes a staple of album oriented rock radio (AOR), soon after its release and beyond. It spins off three singles including “Just What I Needed” (#27 Pop), “Good Times Roll” (#41 Pop), and “My Best Friend’s Girl” (#35 Pop) and spends over two and a half years (139 weeks) on the Billboard pop album chart. The albums iconic cover photo features a shot of Russian born model Natalya Medvedeva. Regarded as a landmark new wave rock album, it is The Cars best selling studio release. The track “Moving In Stereo” is further immortalized when it used to great comic effect in the 80’s teen comedy “Fast Times At Ridgemont High”. The song is featured in a sequence when Brad (Judge Reinhold) is fantasizing about Linda (Phoebe Cates)  while gazing at her out of the bathroom window. The scene ends with Linda accidentally walking in on Brad in the bathroom, catching him red handed. The album is first remastered and reissued on CD in 1999 as two disc deluxe edition with the original nine song album on the first disc. The second CD features thirteen bonus tracks including live performances and demos. It is also released as a hybrid SACD by Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab in 2015. “The Cars” is also reissued on vinyl by Rhino Records in January of 2016, as part of their “Start Your Ear Off Right” series, pressing the LP on blue translucent vinyl, also replicating the original packaging and inner sleeve. Another colored vinyl pressing (yellow) of the album is issued as part of the box set "The Elektra Years - 1978 - 1987” in June of 2016. “The Cars” peaks at number eighteen on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 6x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: June 6, 1989 - “In Step”, the fourth studio album by Stevie Ray Vaughan And Double Trouble is released. Produced by Double Trouble and Jim Gaines, it is recorded at Kiva Sudios in Memphis, TN, Sound Castle and Summa Studios in Los Angeles, CA from January 25 - March 13, 1989. The album is recorded shortly after Vaughan completes a successful stint in rehab regaining his sobriety after many years of alcohol and substance abuse. Fully focused and playing better than he had in years, Vaughan’s newly found sobriety, and the struggle to remain free of drugs and alcohol provides the inspiration for several of the albums’ songs including “Tightrope”, Wall Of Denial", and “Crossfire”. An artistic and commercial success upon its release, is his best selling album to date, also winning Vaughan a Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Blues Album in 1990. Sadly, it is the final album released by Stevie Ray Vaughan And Double Trouble before the guitarists death in August of 1990. In 1999, the album is reissued with four live bonus tracks and a short monologue by Vaughan talking about his struggles with substance abuse and becoming sober. It is also remastered and reissued as a hybrid SACD by Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab in 2011. The album is also reissued as a 200 gram vinyl LP by Analogue Productions in 2014. “In Step” peaks at number thirty three on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: May 14, 1976 - “Fly Like An Eagle”, the ninth album by The Steve Miller Band is released. Produced by Steve Miller, it is recorded at CBS Studios in San Francisco, CA from Late 1975 - Early 1976. Recording with varying degrees of success since their debut album “Children Of The Future”, The Steve Miller Band finally have their major breakthrough in late 1973 with “The Joker”. Miller takes a nearly two year hiatus from recording after the departures of drummer John King and keyboardist Dick Thompson. They are replaced by Gary Mallaber who as both a drummer and keyboard player becomes a key member of the new line up. Before the sessions begin in late 1975, Steve Miller writes enough material for not one but two albums. Once in the studio, Miller, Mallaber and bassist Lonnie Turner are supported by John McFee (dobro), Les Dudek, Curley Cooke (guitar), Joachim Young (organ), Kenny Johnson (drums), Charles Calamise (bass), and Chicago blues legend James Cotton (harmonica). The sessions yield more than two dozen songs. Initially, Miller intends for them to be released as a double album, but is convinced by Capitol to choose the best twelve songs for a single LP, and save the rest. The title track “Fly Like A Eagle” (#2 Pop) is actually written years prior to the release of “The Joker” album. The song’s opening guitar riff has its origins in the song “My Dark Hour” from the “Brave New World” album, that also features Paul McCartney (credited as “Paul Ramon”) on bass, guitar and drums. Miller re-tools the song from how it was originally performed, giving it a more funky, syncopated feel, drawing inspiration from War’s “Slippin’ Into Darkness”. Once released, it quickly becomes the best selling studio album of Miller’s career. It spins off three singles including “Take The Money And Run” (#11 Pop) and “Rock'N Me” (#1 Pop). Though not issued as singles, the tracks “Serenade”, “Dance, Dance, Dance” and “Wild Mountain Honey” become rock radio staples and firm fan favorites. “Fly Like An Eagle” is remixed into quadraphonic stereo and is released on 8-Track tape. Also a favorite album of audiophiles, the original stereo mix is released as a half-speed mastered LP by Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab in 1979. Originally released on CD in 1987, it is remastered and reissued in 1999 on CD and limited edition vinyl. In 2001, DTS Entertainment issues a DVD-A disc featuring the original quadraphonic stereo mix. For its 30th anniversary in 2006, Capitol issues a newly remastered edition of “Eagle” with three additional live bonus tracks, and a bonus DVD with the contents of disc one in 5.1 surround sound. And in October of 2016, the album is released on vinyl again as part of an extensive reissue program, to celebrate the 75th anniversary of Capitol Records. “Fly Like An Eagle” peaks at number three on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 4x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: March 22, 1965 - “Bringing It All Back Home”, the fifth album by Bob Dylan is released. Produced by Tom Wilson, it is recorded at Columbia Recording Studios in New York City from January 13-15, 1965. Recorded just four months after the release of his previous album “Another Side Of Bob Dylan”, the prolific musician shifts musical direction yet again. Moving away from the acoustic based protest songs that have established him as a leader of the folk music movement, Dylan cuts half of the new album with a band using electric guitars and bass for the first time. The very act of a folk musician using electric instruments is considered a highly controversial act, with many of his peers having a bias against rock & roll. Dylan’s lyrics also begin to change dramatically, becoming more personal and adopting an abstract “stream of consciousness” prose in many of them. This is most evident on the albums classic single “Subterranean Homesick Blues” (#39 Pop), drawing inspiration from disparate sources including beat poet Jack Kerouac, folk musicians Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger, and rock & roll pioneer Chuck Berry. The song becomes Bob Dylan’s first chart single in the US, and one of his best known compositions. The album contains a number of other classics including “Maggie’s Farm”, which Dylan performs to a hostile crowd at the Newport Folk Festival, jeering him for feeling that he has betrayed his core folk music audience by going electric. “Gates Of Eden”, “It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue” and “It’s Alright Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” also become among Dylan’s best known, widely covered songs. Also on the second side of the album is his recording of “Mr. Tambourine Man”, originally cut during the “Another Side” sessions, but the first version is left unreleased. Bob re-records it again on the final day of recording for “Bringing It All Back Home on January 15, 1965. Only five days later, The Byrds record their electric version of "Mr. Tambourine Man” in Los Angeles with producer Terry Melcher. Their version hits number one on the pop singles chart late June of 1965. Once released, “Bringing It All Back Home” becomes Bob Dylan’s most successful release to date, topping the UK album chart and his first top ten album in the US. First released on CD in the late 80’s, it is remastered and reissued in 2003, as a hybrid SACD, featuring the original stereo mix, and a newly remixed 5.1 surround mix. Reissue label Sundazed Records reissues the original mono mix as a 180 gram vinyl LP in 2001, making it available for the first time since going out of print in the late 60’s. Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab also reissues the title as a double vinyl set, mastered at 45 RPM in 2012, followed by a hybrid SACD featuring only the stereo mix in 2013. “Bringing It All Back Home” peaks at number six on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: May 13, 1985 - “Brothers In Arms”, the fifth studio album by Dire Straits is released. Produced by Mark Knopfler and Neil Dorfsman, it is recorded at AIR Studios in Montserrat and London and The Power Station in New York City from November 1984 - March 1985. Coming almost three years after their previous release “Love Over Gold”, Dire Straits guitarist and leader Mark Knopfler take the band in another musical direction from the quieter and laid back vibe of the previous album. Cutting the basic tracks at AIR Studios on the Caribbean island of Montserrat, Knopfler and engineer/co-founder Neil Dorfsman are unhappy with the original drum tracks played by Terry Williams. Deciding that they need to be recorded, after suggesting a few different players which include Andy Newmark and Peter Erskine, they decide on former Weather Report drummer Omar Hakim. Hakim arrives in Montserrat a short time later, re-recording the drum tracks on all ten songs in just two and a half days. Combining bluesy and folk influenced songs with modern, high tech production, the end result is the most successful album of Dire Straits career. “Brothers” is one of the first major albums to be recorded on digital recording equipment (on a Sony DASH 3324 tape machine), with it being more geared toward the then increasingly more popular compact disc format. With the CD version clocking in at over fifty five minutes, the vinyl LP version (edited down to forty seven minutes and forty four seconds) includes edited down versions of several songs in order to maintain high sound quality in that format. It spins off five singles including “Money For Nothing” (#1 Pop), “Walk Of Life” (#7 Pop), and “So Far Away” (#19 Pop). It also makes history as the first album to sell over one million copies on CD in the US. The album wins two Grammy Awards including Best Rock Performance By A Duo Or Group With Vocal in 1986. It wins a third Grammy in 2006 for the 5.1 surround SACD reissue for Best Surround Sound Album. Long revered for its excellent sound quality and engineering, “Brothers” is a favorite of audiophile music fans. It has most recently been remastered and reissued by Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab, in 2013 as a limited edition hybrid SACD, and in 2015 as a 180 gram double vinyl LP set mastered at 45 RPM. “Brothers In Arms” spends nine weeks at number one on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 9x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: May 10, 1994 - “Weezer” (aka “The Blue Album”), the debut album by Weezer is released. Produced by Ric Ocasek, it is recorded at Electric Lady Studios in New York City from August - September 1993. Formed in 1992 by lead guitarist and vocalist Rivers Cuomo, drummer Patrick Wilson, bassist Matt Sharp and rhythm guitarist Jason Cropper, Weezer are playing live gigs only months afterward. Continuing to rehearse and write songs, within a year, the band begin drawing major label attention and are signed to Geffen subsidiary DGC Records in 1993. The band are paired with Cars co-founder and lead singer Ric Ocasek who signs on to produce their debut album. During the recording, Jason Cropper quits the band and he is replaced by Brian Bell. Weezer’s unique musical sensibility which combines punk and metal attitude with strong power pop guitar riffs and hooks, are counterbalanced by the band’s own shy and nerdy demeanor. The first single “Undone - The Sweater Song”, is supported with a quirky and innovative low budget video directed by Spike Jonze (“Being John Malkovich”, “Adaptation”), that becomes an immediate hit on MTV. Jonze also directs the video for the follow up single “Buddy Holly” (#2 Modern Rock, #18 Hot 100 Airplay), in which the band are digitally morphed into clips from the classic sitcom “Happy Days”, playing on stage at Arnold’s Drive-In. Using the same green screen techniques employed by Industrial Light & Magic on the film “Forrest Gump”, Weezer’s performance footage is seamlessly blended in with the film clips from the series. Also featuring a cameo appearance by actor Al Molinaro, the video is another huge MTV favorite, winning four MTV VMA awards in 1995 including Best Alternative Video and Breakthrough Video. The album spins off a third and final single with “Say It Ain’t So” (#7 Modern Rock, #51 Hot 100 Airplay). In time, Weezer’s debut album will come to be regarded as one of the best albums of the 90’s. In 2004, it is remastered and reissued as a two disc Deluxe Edition. The first disc features the original ten track album, with disc two containing fourteen tracks, including B-sides, unreleased track, live acoustic recordings and alternate mixes. Originally released on vinyl in very limited quantities in 1994, it is reissued briefly in 2002 by Geffen Records. In 2012, it is released as a 180 gram vinyl LP by Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab, pressed on blue marbled vinyl, and by Back To Black (UK & Europe on standard black vinyl). A hybrid SACD is also issued by the label in 2014. Another vinyl reissue released by Geffen/UMe with Direct Metal Mastering and includes a poster is released in 2016. “Weezer” peaks at number sixteen on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 3x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: March 9, 1975 - “Katy Lied”, the fourth studio album by Steely Dan is released. Produced by Gary Katz, it is recorded at ABC Recording Studios in Los Angeles, CA from November 1974 - January 1975. The album’s title is a play on the word “katydid”, the species of grasshopper that appears on the LP’s cover (taken by Fagen’s then girlfriend Dorothy White). Several of the songs are piano based, with the duo utilizing keyboardist Michael Omartian to play on many of the tracks. For the sessions, Becker and Fagen use a seven foot long Bosendorfer grand piano (at the time costing over $13,000), which they talk their label ABC Records into paying for. The album features numerous top flight musicians including Crusaders member Wilton Felder (bass), Chuck Rainey (bass), Victor Feldman (percussion), Rick Derringer, Hugh McCracken, Larry Carlton, Dean Parks, Elliott Randall (guitar), Hal Blaine (drums), Michael McDonald (background vocals) and future Toto members David Paich (keyboards) and Jeff Porcaro (drums). Only twenty one years old at the time, Porcaro plays drums on nine of the albums’ ten tracks. Becker and Fagen experience major technical difficulties when the dbx noise reduction system malfunctions, rather than using the industry standard Dolby A noise reduction while mixing the album. In spite of efforts to correct the problem, they are unable to fix it entirely. Nearly deciding to scrap the album altogether, Becker and Fagen release it as is but have refused to listen to it since. It spins off two singles including “Black Friday” (#37 Pop) and “Bad Sneakers” (#103 Pop). In 1978, the audiophile label Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab issues a half speed mastered pressing of the album. It sells poorly upon its release, and is deleted not long after. Though it ends up becoming a sought after collector’s item after it goes out of print, commanding as much as $300 - 400 for a sealed copy. The album is remastered and reissued on CD in 1999. “Katy Lied” peaks at number thirteen on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: May 17, 1975 - “That’s The Way Of The World”, the sixth studio album by Earth, Wind & Fire hits #1 on the Billboard Top 200 for 3 weeks, also topping the R&B album chart for 5 weeks (non-consecutive) on April 19, 1975. Produced by Maurice White and Charles Stepney, it is recorded at The Caribou Ranch in Nederland, CO from September 16, 1974 - October 2, 1974. The bands’ sixth release also serves as the soundtrack to the Sig Shore (“Superfly”) produced and directed film, the movie flops at the box office, but the album takes on a life of its own, becoming EWF’s mainstream breakthrough. It spins off two singles including “Shining Star” (#1 Pop & R&B) and the title track (#5 R&B, #12 Pop), as well as fan and airplay favorites such as “Reasons”, “Yearnin’ Learnin’” and “Africano”. It also wins the band their first Grammy Award for Best R&B Vocal Performance By A Duo Or Group (for “Shining Star”) in 1976. At the time of the album’s original release, it is also issued as a quadraphonic stereo LP and 8-track tape. Well regarded by audiophiles for its excellent sonics, the album is also issued as a half-speed mastered LP in the mid 80’s by Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab, and as a hybrid SACD disc by the label in 2005. Both are long out of print and command premium prices on the collectors market. “That’s The Way Of The World” is certified 3x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: June 13, 1983 - “Texas Flood”, the debut album by Stevie Ray Vaughan And Double Trouble is released. Produced by Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble, and Richard Mullen, it is recorded at the Down Town Studio in Los Angeles, CA from November 22 - 24, 1982. Recorded in just three days at musician Jackson Browne’s recording studio, he offers the band free use of his studio after seeing them play at the Montreux Jazz Festival in July of 1982. “Flood” is cut almost entirely live, with the band setting up in one corner of the cavernous warehouse space. Vaughan’s unique guitar tone is captured using three amplifiers chained together including a two vintage Fender Vibroverbs and a Dumble Dumbleland Special borrowed from Browne. Initially intended as a demo only, the tapes are heard by legendary A&R man John Hammond who passes a copy on to Greg Geller, the head of A&R for Epic Records who immediately signs the band. The band are given an advance for Vaughan to return to the studio to re-record some of his vocals which are cut at Riverside Sound in Austin, TX in early 1983. The album spins off two singles including “Pride And Joy” (#20 Mainstream Rock) and “Lovestruck Baby”. The album is remastered and reissued on CD in 1999 with five additional bonus tracks. Is is also reissued in 2006 as a double 180 gram vinyl LP by Pure Pleasure Records, including the added bonus tracks. Sundazed Music, Music On Vinyl and Analogue Productions also issue vinyl reissues. Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab reissues the title as a limited hybrid SACD in 2010. Sony Legacy also remasters the album on CD again in 2013 for its thirtieth anniversary, as a two disc deluxe edition, with the second CD containing nine extra tracks. “Texas Flood” peaks at number thirty eight on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: January 19, 1980 - “The Pretenders”, the debut album by The Pretenders is released (UK release is on December 27, 1979). Produced by Chris Thomas and Nick Lowe, it is recorded at Wessex Studios and AIR Studios in London from Mid - Late 1979. Initially, recording is begun with Nick Lowe (Elvis Costello & The Attractions) who produces the bands’ UK debut single, a cover of The Kinks “Stop Your Sobbing”, but bows out of working on their first full length release, feeling that the band “wasn’t going anywhere”. Producer Chris Thomas (The Sex Pistols, The Beatles) steps in and takes over the production duties. The albums’ bold mixture of new wave, pop, and punk attitude topped by lead singer and guitarist Chrissie Hynde’s vocals immediately finds favor with rock fans, becoming a critical and commercial success upon its release. The album spins off four singles including “Brass In Pocket” (#1 UK, #14 US Pop). First remastered and reissued by Rhino Records in 2006, it is released as a two disc deluxe edition with the second CD featuring demo versions of several songs, single only B-sides, and five additional live recordings. The album is also issued as a hybrid SACD by Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab in 2014. “The Pretenders” hits number one on the UK album chart, peaking at number nine on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: January 26, 1970 - “Chicago (aka “Chicago II”)”, the second album by Chicago is released. Produced by James William Guercio, it is recorded at Columbia Recording Studios in New York City and Hollywood, CA in August 1969. Following the groundswell of underground FM radio play for their debut release and the relentless touring they do in support of it, Chicago returns to the studio during breaks in their whirlwind schedule to record the follow up. In the interim period, the band shorten their name from the Chicago Transit Authority to Chicago. Like their debut, the album is another double LP set, with much of it being dominated by side long music suites, one of which titled “Ballet For A Girl In Buchannon” is its centerpiece. The album is Chicago’s commercial breakthrough spinning off three top ten singles including “Make Me Smile” (#9 Pop), “25 Or 6 To 4” (#4 Pop) and “Colour My World” (#7 Pop). Original pressings of the LP come packaged with a poster of the album cover artwork featuring the bands now famous logo, designed by CBS art director John Berg. The album is remastered and reissued on vinyl by Rhino Records in 2009, with audiophile label Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab also issuing a hybrid SACD in 2015. The album is also reissued on January 27, 2017, with a new remix by Steven Wilson. The new mixes are made from the original 16-track multi-track masters, bringing more clarity and definition to the recordings which had sounded flat and muddy in previous releases going back to the first LP pressings in 1970. “Chicago II” peaks at number four on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: November 6, 1981 - “Shake It Up”, the fourth album by The Cars is released. Produced by Roy Thomas Baker, it is recorded at Syncro Sound Studios in Boston, MA from Spring - Fall 1981. The Boston based band’s fourth release is in a more commercial and pop oriented vein than their previous release, the hard edged and experimental “Panorama”. Recording in their newly purchased Syncro Sound Studios (formerly Intermedia Studios), it also is The Cars last album to be produced by long time producer Roy Thomas Baker. It will spin off two hit singles including “Since You’re Gone” (#41 Pop) and the title track (#4 Pop), which is their first Top 10 hit and their highest charting single to date. The song “I’m Not The One” is belatedly released as a single in early 1986 (in remixed form) as part of their “Greatest Hits” album. In 2009, audiophile label Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab remasters and reissues the album on CD and vinyl, packaging the CD edition in a mini-LP sleeve. The album is also reissued on CD and vinyl by Rhino Records in June of 2016, as part of “The Elektra Years 1978-1987” box set, compiling all six of their studio albums. Shake It Up" peaks at number nine on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 2x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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On this day in music history: October 19, 1987 - “Kick”, the sixth album by INXS is released. Produced by Chris Thomas, it is recorded at Rhinoceros Studios in Sydney, Australia and Studio De La Grande Armée in Paris, France from Late 1986 - Mid 1987. Following the Platinum selling success of their previous album “Listen Like Thieves”, INXS return to the studio with producer Chris Thomas to work on the follow up. From the outset, the band write and record the album with the goal of every track being a potential single. When the band hands the finished album in to Atlantic Records, the label tell them bluntly that they hate the record, and saying that “it was only suited for "black radio”. Atlantic offers the band a million dollars to scrap it and record another one. INXS stands their ground and steadfastly refuses to conform to their record labels wishes. The band are vindicated when it receives universal praise by fans and critics alike upon its release, becoming the biggest selling album of their career. It spins off four top 10 singles in the US including “New Sensation” (#3 Pop), “Devil Inside” (#2 Pop), “Never Tear Us Apart” (#7 Pop) and “Need You Tonight” (#1 Pop). The album is remastered and reissued on CD in 2002 with four additional bonus tracks. Audiophile label Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab reissues the album on vinyl in 2011 (re-pressed again in 2015 when the original pressing sells out), making it available in that format in the US for the first time in more than twenty years. And in 2012, a twenty fifth anniversary edition is released in Europe, including a three CD/DVD Super Deluxe Edition with sixty four page booklet, a poster and sticker sheet. The three CD’s include a remastered version of the original album, live performances, demos, 7" and 12" single mixes. The DVD features three original music videos, live performance footage from the “Kick Tour” and a documentary on the making of the album. “Kick” peaks at number three on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified 6x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

Weezer - The Blue Album (Black 180gram #1620/3000)

Ive featured this before, but not this pressing. Mofi did an amazing job on this pressing. Mastering at half speed from original master tapes made this sound absolutely brilliant. this classic album has been in my rotation FOREVER. I can also remember as a kid our first Gateway computer came with the music video for “Buddy Holly..” No clue why, but I loved the song and considered myself a fan from then on. 

This album is only properly experienced through this pressing, I promise you its worth the high price tag!

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Got my limited edition/numbered MFSL pressing of Weezer’s debut album. It sounds wonderful. The packaging is fantastic (though the 180g vinyl still managed to cause a small seam split in the heavy duty cardboard used on the jacket of my copy while in transit). 

This is the first MFSL album I’ve ever bought new. It was worth the $30. 

Pick up yer copy now before this shit gets hella expensive.