mobile nations

4

I love everything about Fall in The Great Smoky Mountains.
Shot on my iPhone 7+

Name: Min Yoongi
Element: Fire
Personality: Appears cold-hearted when you first meet him, actually cares deeply for his close ones, SASS KING
Appearance: Black hair, gold/yellow eyes, bandages on arms and chest, scars on arms and chest
Extra info: Owns a fire ferret named min holly, Writes short stories and poems
Backstory: ???

- Admin Mel

7

Santiago, Chile, 2017-09-15

Flags are out for the 18th of September, which is celebrated as Chile’s national day, although that is actually the date when the first national council met in 1810. The date then actually marks the beginning of the independence process, and it is the day when national celebrations have taken place every year since that time. (Chile finally gained independence from Spain on the 12th of February 1818.)

Copyright © Andrew Graeme Gould

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The most dramatic episode of workplace activism during this era was an illegal strike of more than 200,000 postal workers in March 1970. . . President Johnson suggested to Congress a modest pay increase for postal workers. Congress took no action, but in 1970 it offered them a puny 4 percent raise–and a week later voted itself a 41 percent salary increase… At one point Nixon mobilized the National Guard to sort and deliver the mail, but postal work was hard, skilled work and untrained soldiers could not easily perform it. The breakdown of discipline was palpable. Of the 26,000 soldiers called up to intervene in the strike, only 16,000 bothered to show. Within a matter of two weeks, the disproportionately Black postal workplace won a 14 percent wage increase.
—  From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation, Keeanga Yamhatta Taylor
100,00 RALLY AT U.N. AGAINST VIETNAM WAR

Douglas Robinson, The New York Times, 16 April 1967

Thousands of antiwar demonstrators marched through the Streets of Manhattan yesterday and then massed in front of the United Nations building to hear United States policy In Vietnam denounced.

The Police Department’s office of Community Relations said that police, off leers at the scene estimated the number of demonstrators outside the United Nations at “between 100,000 and 125,000.”

It was difficult to make any precise count because people were continually leaving and entering the rally area. It was also almost Impossible to distinguish the demonstrators from passersby and spectators.

On Friday the police had announced that they were preparing for a crowd of 100,000 to 400,000.

Leaders of Parade
It was the largest peace demonstration staged in New York since the Vietnam war began. It took four hours for all the marchers to leave Central Park for the United Nations Plaza.

The parade was led by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Dr. Benjamin Spock, the pediatrician, and Harry Belafonte, the singer, as well as several other civil rights and religious figures, all of whom linked arms as they moved out of the park at the head of the line.

The marchers—who had poured into New York on chartered buses, trains and cars from cities as far away as Pittsburgh, Cleveland and Chicago—included housewives from Westchester, students and poets from the Lower East Side, priests and nuns, doctors, businessmen and teachers.

Chant From Youths
As they began trooping out of Central Park toward Fifth Avenue, some of the younger demonstrators chanted: “Hell no, we won’t go,“ and “Hey, Hey, L. B. J., How Many Kids Did You Kill Today.”

Most of the demonstrators, however, marched silently as they passed equally silent crowds of onlookers. At several points—notably Central Park South from the—Avenue of the Americas to Fifth Avenue—the sidewalks were swarming with onlookers. Other blocks were almost deserted.

Some of the marchers were , hit with eggs and red paint. At 47th Street and Park Avenue, several demonstrators were struck by steel rods from a building under construction. Some plastic cups filled with sand barely missed another group. There were no serious injuries.

At least five persons were arrested for disorderly conduct. Three youths were taken into custody when they tried to rush a float that depicted the Statue of Liberty.

The demonstration here and a similar One in San Francisco were sponsored by the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, a loose confederation of leftwing, pacifist and moderate antiwar groups;

A few minutes before 11 AM, an hour before the parade started, about 70 young men gathered on an outcropping of rock in the southeast comer of the Sheep Meadow in Central Park to bum their draft cards. They were quickly joined by others, some of whom appeared to have decided to join in on the spot.

Hard to Check
The demonstrators said that nearly 200 cards were burned, although in the chanting, milling throng it was impossible to get an accurate count or to tell whether all the papers burned were draft cards.

Surrounded by a human chain that kept out hundreds of onlookers, the demonstrators first clustered In small groups around cigarette lighters, then sat down and passed cards up to a youth holding a flaming coffee cam Cheers and chants of “Resist, Resist,” went up as small white cards—many of which were passed hand to hand from outside the circle—caught fire.

Many of the demonstrators carried or wore daffodils and chanted “Flower Power.”

It was the first large draft-card, burning in the protests against the war in Vietnam, although groups of up to a dozen had publicly burned their cards.

Among the group yesterday was a youth in the uniform, jump boots and green beret of the Army Special Forces, whose name tag said “Rader.” He identified himself as Gary Rader of Evanston, Ill., and said he had served a year and a half of active duty as a reservist.

Like the rest of the demonstrators, the card burners were a mixed group. Most were of college age, and Included bearded, button-wearing hippies, earnest students in tweed coats and ties, and youths who fitted in neither category.

There were a number of girls who burned half of their husband’s or boy friend’s draft cards while the men burned the other half. Among the burners were a sprinkling of older men, including several veterans and the Rev. Thomas Hayes of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship.

Last week the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit held unconstitutional a law passed in 1965 banning draft-card burning under pain of a maximum 5-year sentence and a $10,000; fine; Two convictions under the law, however, have been upheld by United States Courts of Appeals in the Second and Eighth Circuits.

Vietcong Flags Raised
In his speech at the United Nations rally, Dr. King repeatedly called on the United States to “honor its word0 and “stop the bombing of North Vietnam.”

“I would like to urge students from colleges all over the nation to use this summer and coming summers educating and organizing communities across the nation against war,” Dr. King told the crowd.

Before making his speech, the minister and a five-man delegation presented a formal note to Dr. Ralph Bunche, Undersecretary for Special Political Affairs at the United Nations.

The note said: “We rally at the United Nations in order to affirm support of the principals of peace, universality, equal rights and self-determination of peoples embodied in the Charter and acclaimed by mankind, but violated by the United States.” The demonstrators began to assemble in Central Park’s Sheep Meadow early in the morning.

On one grassy knoll, a group calling itself the United States Committee to Aid the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam built a 40-foot high tower of black cardboard tubing. They then attached a number of Liberation Front (Vietcong) flags, of blue and red with a gold star in the center.

At 12:20 P.M., the parade stepped off from Central Park South and the Avenue of the Americas, with Dr. King and the other leaders in the vanguard. They were surrounded by a group of parade marshals who linked hands to shield them from possible violence. From the hundreds of people  lining the route of march came expressions of anger or support.

“I think it’s terrible, ” said Carl Hoffman, an engineer from Hartford, who stood at the corner where the march began.

Nearby, 20-year-old Estelle Klein, an office manager from Queens, gazed at the students, nuns, businessmen, veterans and doctors marching by and said: “I’d be out there too, but I don’t know, I just don’t think it’ll do any good.”

As the demonstrators moved east on 59th Street, they encountered bands of youths carrying American flags and hoisting placards with such slogans as “Bomb Hanoi” and “Dr. Spock Smokes Bananas.”

The bands of youths ran along the sidewalks paralleling the line of march, calling insults at the demonstrators.

Along one stretch of high-rise apartment houses on Lexington Avenue, eggs were dumped from a number of windows and many marchers had their clothes stained with red paint tossed by persons behind police barricades.

Guests Peer Out
From the windows of the Barbizon-Plaza Hotel the Plaza and the St. Moritz, guests—a few still in pajamas—peered from their rooms at the throng moving out of the park. Most of these watchers neither applauded nor heckled.

Although the demonstrators were supposed to follow a line of march set up by the police, several thousand members of the Harlem contingent broke away and marched down Seventh Avenue through Times Square.

Several fistfights broke out in Times Square between angry motorists caught in a huge traffic jam and the paraders.

At 42d Street and Second Avenue, a fight broke out between several spectators and 19-year-old Edward Katz of Manhattan. Mr. Katz said later that he was trying to get to his car with his wife and baby when “a group of anti-peace people started knocking over the baby carriage.”

By 4 P.M., the last of the marchers had moved out of Central Park, leaving it looking like at disaster area. The paths and roadways were covered with litter.

There were several floats in the parade, including one on which Pete Seeger, the folk singer, rode with a number :of children. They sang folk songs like “This Land Is Your Land” as they rolled along the line of march.

Most of the marchers carried signs that had been authorized and printed by the Spring Mobilization Committee. Among the slogans were “Stop the Bombing,0 “No Vietnamese Ever Called Me Nigger’! and, “Children Are Not Born to Burn.”

There were many unauthorized banners and placards, however. One, a bed sheet carried by three young men, bore in large black letters the words, “Ho Chi Minh is a Virgin.”

A minor scuffle between the police and the peace marchers broke out at 3 P.M. on the south side of 42d Street just west of First Avenue when some marchers tried to turn north.

Patrolmen, on foot moved into the crowd, trying to push them into line. Other policemen on horseback charged into the throng and helped turn the marchers back. Nearby, counter-demonstrators screamed: “Kill them, kill them.”

The speeches at the United Nations did not, start until after 2 P.M. While the demonstrators waited, filling the plaza from 47th to 42d Streets, they were entertained by folk singers.

An overflow crowd filled the side-streets west of First Avenue. More than 2,000 policemen were on hand at the United Nations to keep order, and to separate demonstrators from counter-demonstrators.

‘Be-in’ at the Park
A “be-in” of several thousand young men and women preceded the start of the parade. They gathered on a rock but-cropping in the southeast corner of the Sheep Meadow, dancing and singing to the music of guitars, flutes and drums.

Many of the young people had painted their faces and legs with poster paint. The sweet smell of cooking bananas hung over the group.

Unidentified demonstrators set fire to an American flag held up on a flagstaff in the park before the march began, the police said. No arrests were made in connection with the incident.

After leaving Dr. Bundle’s office at the United Nations, Dr. King told newsmen that the “demonstration was “just a beginning of a massive outpouring of concern and protest activity against this illegal and unjust war.”

The speeches ended soon after 5 P.M. when a downpour drenched the plaza, converting it into a field of soggy clothing, peeling placards and deep puddles.

The rally area was almost completely deserted by 6:30, except for crews from the Sanitation Department who were cleaning up a mountain; of debris.

Speakers at the rally, in addition to Dr. King, included Floyd McKissick, national secretary of the Congress of Racial Equality, and Stokely Carmichael, leader of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee.

Mr. Carmichael, who spoke against background shouts of “black power,” described the United States’ presence in Vietnam as “brutal and racist,” and declared that he was against “drafting young men, particularly young black Americans.”

Mr. McKissick called for the immediate withdrawal of American troops from Vietnam and predicted that the turnout of marchers would bring “some positive, action” from Washington.

The Rev. James Bevel, who was national director of Spring Mobilization, said he would give President Johnson “one month to stop murdering those folks in Vietnam.”

“That’s all we’ll give him, one month to pull those guns^out,” Mr. Bevel said with his fists upraised. “If he doesn’t, we’ll close down New York City.” He did not elaborate.

Before leaving Central Park, Mr. Belafonte told newsmen that he was participating in the demonstration because “the war in Vietnam—like all wars—is immoral.”

OKAY SINCE APPARENTLY WE PLAYED TWO COMPLETELY DIFFERENT EXPANSIONS: HERE’S A BREAKDOWN OF ACCOMPLISHMENTS FOR LYSE VIS A VIS ESTINIEN

Lyse: acted as the Scions ambassador to the Resistance with flawless execution, rekindled the fires of hope in Ala Gannha, kicked Fordola’s ass SO HARD Fordola felt the need to WARN ZENOS about how badass and strong Lyse was

Crossed an ocean to help liberate another country suffering under a tyrannical regime, successfully held off dozens of Kojin to buy the WoL time to slay Susano, took an active and direct role in both Bardam’s Mettle and the Naadam, directly participated in the liberation of Doma, came back to Ala Mhigo and joined the assault on Specula Imperatoris, and when Conrad named her the Resistance leader in his stead, she accepted the role with the duty and responsibility it called for rather than wallowing in feelings of inadequacy, and after Gyr Abania is freed she recognizes that its people need her more than the Scions and doesn’t abandon them

Oh yeah, and she’s there in the assault on Ala Mhigo itself, she’s with Thancred near the spawn point

Estinien: broke a cannon (helpful!), and destroyed the eyes (also helpful!), but was in all of three (3) cutscenes and was definitely not the star here

And to the point that Lyse didn’t do enough “on her own” I would like to see YOU liberate two nations and mobilize an army alone. Go on, I’m waiting

(Not to mention not even the WoL does anything by themselves. You can ignore the journal entries and throwaway lines of dialogue all you want, but every duty mentions your party of adventures, so the WoL almost never does anything alone)

I suggest you do some serious self reflecting on why you think Estinien is more important to the Stormblood story than Lyse is

bloomberg.com
BREAKING: Trump Weighs Mobilizing National Guard for Immigration Roundups: AP
A draft memo obtained by The Associated Press outlines a Trump administration proposal under consideration to mobilize as many as 100,000 National Guard troops to round up unauthorized immigrants. Millions of those who would be affected in 11 states live nowhere near the Mexico border.

(AP) – The Trump administration is considering a proposal to mobilize as many as 100,000 National Guard troops to round up unauthorized immigrants, including millions living nowhere near the Mexico border, according to a draft memo obtained by The Associated Press.

The 11-page document calls for the unprecedented militarization of immigration enforcement as far north as Portland, Oregon, and as far east as New Orleans, Louisiana.

Four states that border on Mexico are included in the proposal — California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas — but it also encompasses seven states contiguous to those four — Oregon, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana.

Governors in the 11 states would have a choice whether to have their guard troops participate, according to the memo, written by U.S. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly, a retired four-star Marine general.

While National Guard personnel have been used to assist with immigration-related missions on the U.S.-Mexico border before, they have never been used as broadly or as far north.

The memo is addressed to the then-acting heads of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection. It would serve as guidance to implement the wide-ranging executive order on immigration and border security that President Donald Trump signed Jan. 25. Such memos are routinely issued to supplement executive orders.

Also dated Jan. 25, the draft memo says participating troops would be authorized “to perform the functions of an immigration officer in relation to the investigation, apprehension and detention of aliens in the United States.” It describes how the troops would be activated under a revived state-federal partnership program, and states that personnel would be authorized to conduct searches and identify and arrest any unauthorized immigrants.

Requests to the White House and the Department of Homeland Security for comment and a status report on the proposal were not answered.

The draft document has circulated among DHS staff over the last two weeks. As recently as Friday, staffers in several different offices reported discussions were underway.

If implemented, the impact could be significant. Nearly one-half of the 11.1 million people residing in the U.S. without authorization live in the 11 states, according to Pew Research Center estimates based on 2014 Census data.

Use of National Guard troops would greatly increase the number of immigrants targeted in one of Trump’s executive orders last month, which expanded the definition of who could be considered a criminal and therefore a potential target for deportation. That order also allows immigration agents to prioritize removing anyone who has “committed acts that constitute a chargeable criminal offense.”

Under current rules, even if the proposal is implemented, there would not be immediate mass deportations. Those with existing deportation orders could be sent back to their countries of origin without additional court proceedings. But deportation orders generally would be needed for most other unauthorized immigrants.

The troops would not be nationalized, remaining under state control.

Spokespeople for the governors of Arizona, Utah, Nevada, California, Colorado, Oklahoma, Oregon and New Mexico said they were unaware of the proposal, and either declined to comment or said it was premature to discuss whether they would participate. The other three states did not immediately respond to the AP.

The proposal would extend the federal-local partnership program that President Barack Obama’s administration began scaling back in 2012 to address complaints that it promoted racial profiling.

The 287(g) program, which Trump included in his immigration executive order, gives local police, sheriff’s deputies and state troopers the authority to assist in the detection of immigrants who are in the U.S. illegally as a regular part of their law enforcement duties on the streets and in jails.

The draft memo also mentions other items included in Trump’s executive order, including the hiring of an additional 5,000 border agents, which needs financing from Congress, and his campaign promise to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico.

The signed order contained no mention of the possible use of state National Guard troops.

According to the draft memo, the militarization effort would be proactive, specifically empowering Guard troops to solely carry out immigration enforcement, not as an add-on the way local law enforcement is used in the program.

Allowing Guard troops to operate inside non-border states also would go far beyond past deployments.

In addition to responding to natural or man-made disasters or for military protection of the population or critical infrastructure, state Guard forces have been used to assist with immigration-related tasks on the U.S.-Mexico border, including the construction of fences.

In the mid-2000s, President George W. Bush twice deployed Guard troops on the border to focus on non-law enforcement duties to help augment the Border Patrol as it bolstered its ranks. And in 2010, then-Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer announced a border security plan that included Guard reconnaissance, aerial patrolling and military exercises.

In July 2014, then-Texas Gov. Rick Perry ordered 1,000 National Guard troops to the border when the surge of migrant children fleeing violence in Central America overwhelmed U.S. officials responsible for their care. The Guard troops’ stated role on the border at the time was to provide extra sets of eyes but not make arrests.

Bush initiated the federal 287(g) program — named for a section of a 1996 immigration law — to allow specially trained local law enforcement officials to participate in immigration enforcement on the streets and check whether people held in local jails were in the country illegally. ICE trained and certified roughly 1,600 officers to carry out those checks from 2006 to 2015.

The memo describes the program as a “highly successful force multiplier” that identified more than 402,000 “removable aliens.”

But federal watchdogs were critical of how DHS ran the program, saying it was poorly supervised and provided insufficient training to officers, including on civil rights law. Obama phased out all the arrest power agreements in 2013 to instead focus on deporting recent border crossers and immigrants in the country illegally who posed a safety or national security threat.

Trump’s immigration strategy emerges as detentions at the nation’s southern border are down significantly from levels seen in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Last year, the arrest tally was the fifth-lowest since 1972. Deportations of people living in the U.S. illegally also increased under the Obama administration, though Republicans criticized Obama for setting prosecution guidelines that spared some groups from the threat of deportation, including those brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

Last week, ICE officers arrested more than 680 people around the country in what Kelly said were routine, targeted operations; advocates called the actions stepped-up enforcement under Trump.

I think we can all agree that Yuuri’s speech was a central scene this episode, and although I’ve seen a lot of people giving great explanations about Yuuri’s use of 「愛」 in his speech and the difference between 「愛」(ai) and 「恋」(koi) there aren’t many people who go further into his speech than that.


Firstly I’ll just briefly gloss over 「愛」 and 「恋」because what they each connotate in the Japanese language is important to the Yuri!!! on Ice plot

「恋」is kind of like a physical love. It describes one’s longing for someone, but lacks a deeper emotional bond. Used for boyfriend/girlfriend/partner.

「愛」 is a deep love, it encompasses 恋 but also describes emotional love. While it does mean you long for someone, it kind of implies that you’re willing to do, give, or change something to be with them. Used for family/spouse.

***note: on the contrary, while「恋」does imply a physical romance/love, 「恋人」refers to you’re true love, you’d call your fiancé or spouse that, and「愛人」implies someone you’ve had an affair with. So when Victor uses the word 「恋人」…. ;)))


So when Yuuri says
「僕の愛、それは分かり易い愛や恋ではなくて、ヴィクトルとの絆や、家族や、地元に対する微妙な気持ち」
He’s saying his「愛」is not just the physical and emotional love he has for others, his love is literally his relationship with Victor, it is literally his family, and that it is the complicated/abstract feelings he has for others around him (aka Yuuko, Minako, Nishigori). It is a tangible THING such as actions and words as implied by Yuuri’s use of 「物」 instead of 「事」which would describe an idea or a concept.

Another interesting thing to note is when Yuuri says he has “no name for this emotion”
「その感情に名前はない」
At first I thought Yuuri might have been downplaying his emotions but then I realised it wasn’t that, it was that Yuuri really just doesn’t know exactly what 「愛」is just yet despite describing it briefly before because he’s still exploring what it truly means for him.
Before Victor, we all know Yuuri had a big crush on Yuuko, hell, he was going to confess in the first episode. But that’s all it was, a crush, which would take neither 「愛」nor「恋」, but 「好き」(suki).

Now I’m sure you know the difference between 「愛する」and「好きです」but just in case
「好きです」refers to a wide range of types of “like”. You use it for objects, hobbies, and topics, or people-wise, friends and crushes.


Through Yuuri’s speech, we are witnessing his growth and exploration of what 「愛」is, what it means to him, and who the word applies to. Most prominent are his developing feelings of 「愛」towards Victor. The phrase
「繋ぎ止める」
Does mean “to hold on to”, but it also means “to fasten” or “to tie”, and this implies that while Yuuri does not want to let go of Victor, neither does he want Victor to let go of him. Yuuri wants to create a mutual bond with Victor, and he has decided to call this bond 「愛」.


As a side note, here’s further meta on Yuuri and Victor’s developing relationship, shown through the episode preview. It’s very short but 
I do think it’s a cute example of them becoming closer to each other.

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ON SEPTEMBER 30, WE WILL MOBILIZE ORGANIZATIONS, GROUPS, AND INDIVIDUALS, TO STAND TOGETHER FOR RACIAL JUSTICE IN WASHINGTON, DC.

Our mission is to harness the national unrest and dissatisfaction with institutionalized violence into a national mobilization that strengthens local and nationwide efforts for racial equity and justice.

Take a stand with us. None of us are free until all of us are free.

Please contribute what you can to help.Your contributions will cover some of the costs affiliated with the march including security, permits, and other required costs as well as costs for a Stage, Sound, Security to ensure an effective event. Link to donate is in my bio.

To read more about our vision and mission visit www.m4rj.com

#m4rj #indigenousresistence
#racialjustice #not1more #crimesofgenocide #nojusticenopeace

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5

Climate change, tornadoes and mobile homes: A dangerous mix

Tornadoes and mobile homes don’t mix to begin with, but throw in the volatility of climate change and the potential for massive property damage and deaths is even higher in coming decades, indicates a new study by Michigan State University researchers.

The number of mobile homes in the United States has risen dramatically in the past 60 years, to about 9 million currently. Meanwhile, the U.S. is the most tornado-prone country in the world, with an average of 1,200 twisters per year, and scientists predict climate change will continue fueling more unstable weather events including tornadoes.

The annual impact of tornadoes is expected to increase threefold over the next few decades due to the “twin forces of increased climate variability and growth in the human-built environment,” according to the study, which is published online in the journal Regional Science and Urban Economics.

“If the climatologists are right about the continuing effects of climate change,” said Mark Skidmore, MSU economics professor and co-author of the study, “then people living in mobile homes could be particularly vulnerable to tornadoes in the years to come.”

The researchers investigated underlying factors of tornado fatalities in the U.S. from 1980 to 2014. There were 2,447 tornado-related deaths during that period; the bulk occurred in the “tornado alley” region of the Midwest and Southeast.

On average, Texas has the most tornadoes annually (150) followed by Kansas (80), Oklahoma (64) and Florida (61). Florida also has the most mobile homes in the nation (849,304), followed by Texas (731,652), according to U.S. Census data.

The two biggest factors related to tornado fatalities were housing quality (measured by mobile homes as a proportion of housing units) and income level. When a tornado strikes, a county with double the number of mobile homes as a proportion of all homes will experience 62 percent more fatalities than a county with fewer mobile homes, according to the study data.

The number of mobile homes in the U.S. increased from just 315,218 in 1950 to 8.7 million in 2010 - a trend that has been driven largely by persistent income inequality, Skidmore said.

“Though mobile homes offer a relatively inexpensive but comfortable housing alternative, it appears that this trend has made the United States more vulnerable to tornadoes over time,” the study says. “Given this trend and our findings, it is critical that federal, state and local policymakers consider alternatives to reduce vulnerability for those living in this type of housing arrangement.”

Recommendations include requiring communal shelters in mobile home parks and eliminating the often sizable tax breaks that mobile home owners receive and directing that extra revenue toward emergency management and public safety efforts.

While tax advantages make mobile home living more attractive, they also encourage people to live in housing that is more vulnerable to tornadoes, the study notes. “The external cost of being exposed to greater tornado risks may be ignored when households choose to live in mobile homes due to affordability.”

The Second Coming.

As was prophesized, The Son returned to Earth. He showed up without warning or fanfare, in a small suburban neighborhood.

The Reckoning and Revelation had arrived. The Son would judge the wicked, and bring about the End of Days.

He was only one man, but He had all the time in the world.

The Son walked through the streets, sensing the souls of the wicked. He ascended the front steps of a nearby home, His linen robes dragging across the concrete.

With a swift motion, He tore the house’s door from its hinges. Two men inside the living room jumped from the couch, alarmed at the intruder.

They were sinners and they would be judged.

Ignoring their cries and questions, The Son walked slowly up to the first man. With a crushing strength, He reached out and grabbed the man’s throat, squeezed, and let the lifeless body tumble to the floor.

The other man wailed and threw himself at The Son. But his protests were in vain, as The Son’s divine strength forced him through the wall.

Calmly, The Son walked out of the house and continued His work.

In another home, a Righteous woman screamed and cried as The Son crushed the skull of her sinful daughter.

As He was leaving the next house, the sound of sirens filled the air. Police cruisers with flashing lights pulled up, blocking The Son’s forward path.

Officers drew guns and took cover behind their cars.

The Son ignored their warnings and walked toward them slowly, inexorably.

When the police opened fire, the bullets bounced harmlessly off His divine skin and immaculate robes.

The Son stepped toward the nearest officer, ignoring the projectiles which struck His face. With irresistible strength, He wrenched the gun out of the stunned officer’s hands.

Methodically, The Son turned and fired the police-pistol, hitting each officer with a single divinely-guided round. Their bodies littered the streets. The policeman who had been disarmed stared up at The Son, but was left unharmed.

The Son continued His journey. It was slow and brutal, and utterly unstoppable by the forces of man.

News spread, and the nations mobilized against Him. However, He easily resisted their efforts. The Son would melt through steel doorways, rip apart tanks, and ignore even the most high-powered gunfire.

Some began to worship Him.

When He found Himself surrounded by throngs of Innocents and Righteous souls, The Son would simply disappear—reappearing somewhere else on the globe to continue His work.

He became a fact of life, an irresistible force on the planet. Entire societies changed. Some ended their lives before The Son could reach them, but millions more repented.

Religions became totalitarian. Governments became theocracies. Unbelievers were forcibly converted or killed. Holy-Wars raged across the globe.

Before long, the world enveloped itself in nuclear hellfire.


Year later, as survivors huddle together in burned-out wrecks, scavenging for sustenance, they will sometimes see a lone figure on the horizon—swaddled in clean linen robes, walking slowly toward them.

Black Owned Banks

Black Owned Banks:

1. Omega Psi Phi Credit Union – Lawrenceville, Georgia
2. Phi Beta Sigma Federal Credit Union – Washington, DC
3. One United Bank – Los Angeles,California
4. FAMU Federal Credit Union – Tallahassee, Florida
5. Credit Union of Atlanta – Atlanta, Georgia
6. North Milwaukee State Bank – Milwaukee, Wisconsin
7. Seaway Bank – Chicago, Illinois
8. The Harbor Bank- Baltimore, Maryland
9. Liberty Bank – New Orleans, Louisiana
10. United Bank of Philidelphia – Philidelphia, Penn
11. Alamerica Bank – Birmingham, Alabama
12. Broadway Federal Bank – Los Angeles, California
13. Carver State Bank – Savannah, Georgia
14. Capital City Bank – Atlanta, Georgia
15. Citizens Trust Bank – Atlanta, Georgia
16. City National Bank – Newark, New Jersey
17. Commonwealth National Bank – Mobile, Alabama
18. Industrial Bank – Washington D.C.
19. First Tuskegee Bank – Tuskegee, Alabama
20. Mechanics & Farmers Bank – Durham, North Carolina
21. First Independence Bank – Detroit, Michigan
22. First State Bank – Danville, Virginia
23. Illinois Service Federal – Chicago, Illinois
24. Unity National Bank – Houston, Texas
25. Carver Federal Savings Bank – New York, New York
26. OneUnited Bank – Miami, Florida
27. OneUnited Bank – Boston, Massachusetts
28. Tri-State Bank – Memphis, Tennesse
29. Citizens Bank – Nashville, Tennessee
30. South Carolina Community Bank – Columbia, South Carolina
31. Columbia Savings and Loan – Milwaukee, Wisconsin
32. Liberty Bank – Baton Rouge, Louisiana
33. Liberty Bank – Kansas City, Missouri
34. Citizen Trust Bank – Birmingham, Alabama
35. Liberty Bank – Chicago, Illinois
36. Liberty Bank – Jackson, Mississippi
37. Toledo Urban Credit Union – Toledo, Ohio
38. Hill District Credit Union – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

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