mo'ai

Sanmesse is an area in southern Japan that has exact scale replica Mo’ai head from Easter island. Some of the Mo’ai face the ocean, towards Easter island which is facing Samesse from the other side of the world.

Moai

Moai, or mo‘ai, are monolithic human figures carved from rock on the Polynesian island of Easter Island, Chile between the years 1250 and 1500. Nearly half are still at Rano Raraku, the main moai quarry, but hundreds were transported from there and set on stone platforms called ahu around the island’s perimeter. Almost all moai have overly large heads three-fifths the size of their bodies. The moai are chiefly the living faces of deified ancestors. The statues still gazed inland across their clan lands when Europeans first visited the island, but most would be cast down during later conflicts between clans.

The 887 statues, production and transportation is considered a remarkable creative and physical feat. The tallest moai erected, called Paro, was almost 10 metres (33 ft) high and weighed 75 tons, the heaviest erected was a shorter but squatter moai at Ahu Tongariki, weighing 86 tons, and one unfinished sculpture, if completed, would have been approximately 21 metres (69 ft) tall with a weight of about 270 tons.

Eleven or more moai have been removed from the island and transported to locations around the world, including six out of the thirteen moai that were carved from basalt. ( wikipedia ). This one on the picture is in the Musee du Louvre in Paris.

The early 2nd millennium

ENT S4 E2 - Storm Front, Part 2 - 37:58-38:00
Flashback to the early 2nd millennium

According to Wikipedia, “Moai, or mo‘ai, are monolithic human figures carved by the Rapa Nui people from rock on the Chilean Polynesian island of Easter Island between the years 1250 and 1500.” Moai are visible in this episode, when, as Daniels describes, “the timeline’s resetting itself.” “It’s quite a sight.”